Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  1227 / 1254 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 1227 / 1254 Next Page
Page Background

~

·

J

Funerall Sermon.

rounicated,

ori1Pp111edto

us ;for CH

11.

r s

T

is made to us

wi(domdr6tn

Go

o,

and

Cor.•.,

Jtiflice,

or

righteotl{neffi

and

fanBiftwion

and

rtdemptiM,

and Hee doth not fay,

fecit

1

m,

He made us tighteous in the

··oncrete;

but

fa8t« eft nobis

~He

was:maderighteouf-

nelfe tQ us in the

abjlrafJ,

becaufe He commumcates Hts ng.hteoufodfe to us, and

thereby covers our nakednelfe, as

Iacub

clothed in his dder Brothers garmems recei-

ved the blefiina. And

therefor~

the Name of

th~

Sonne

of Go

o

is.

I

E H

ovA H

Jt~flitia

noflra,

.}fu

L

o

R D

Ollrrighteoufnej[e.

;'·

.

.

Befides, no man rs

accept~d

or well pleafing to G.o

r>

for Ius

workes

fake, but

Iemn.~J.6j

rather the worke is accepted for the

wurkemans

fake: as Go o firfi

Refpexit Abelem,

He

refpect~d

or

accepted

of

Abets per[on;

and then followes

&

fa.:rifi~ium

ejtU,

and

th~n

his facrifice : For, Go o cares not for

Abets lambe,

but becaufe

Abelthelambe

offered it; his.heart and willing readinelfe to offera Jambe; was plea

fin~,

and He ac-

cept~d

thefacrifice. As in the

Father of tbe FaithfuU,

Go o couJd..uot accept the

facrifice

of

Ifaac,

becaufe

he~

wasnorfacrificed

fac1o, fed voto

ora/olt~nt.te :

not in

deed, but only in

vow,

and

wiU andpurpofe:

in him,

Yolrmtlf4 replltatur pro faBo,

hi&

wilt

was accepted for.the

faeri~ce.

.

And in

Cain's

facrifice, G o

o

made no difference betweene

t~

lamhe

and the

jbeafe ofcorne,

both wh(ch were after commanded equally in the Law,and the

Panes

propo{itionis

were ever joyned with a

lamhe.

Thedifference was, he c:ffered hiscares

ofcome, but not htmfelfe: and

therefore~he

words be,

Ad Camvero,

&

adp1t<ntril

ejtUnonre[pexit,

But to

Cain,

and to his offering Go

o

hadnotrefped: He·accep.–

ted not his

per(on,

and therefore He regarded nor his

fa&rijice.

And therefore the An-

cient fay : That either of

th~m

offered

paremculttl

&

religione hoHiam,

an equa\1 fa,

Rupm.ir. G<it·

crifice inrefpect ofReligion, and theworlhipof G

0 D:

Sed

non

rem

tlterq; dwifit:

lib.f·"P·!:

.

Cain

madean ill divtfion, he offered.the fruits ofthe earth to G

o

o;

Cor rctinuitfibi,

f eipfum non 6btulit;

hee referved his.

heArt

to him!elfe, and he offered not

himftlfe

to

<J,o": but Abelfirft offered himfelfeto Go

o,

and then his

t,,mke.

A,ndfoSaim

PAul'swordsaretrue;Abtlojfered a greaterfacrifice to

Got>

than

CAin.

Greater fitft,

~a

hoftia copiofior;

becaufe he offered

a

double [acrifice,himfelfe

and his

lam6e :

but

Cam

on!y offered his

corne.

Second!y,

.f2.!!ja exctflentior :

he of· ·

fered a more

~xcellent facrific~,

better chofen, becaufc

de adipibf46.,

of the fatteft, and

bell ofthe flocke: Caincarelefiy tooke thatcamcfirfl to hand;

de ft"lltbtu,

of the

fiuit,

and no more. Thirdly,

.f2.!!jaexjidt:

by

faith

he offered•it; and that

faith

jufli.

iied him and his facrifice, bccaufe ?e bclccved in

th!\.seed

~f

the Woman,

that fhoukt

hmi(e

the ferpents head•.

And fo

tt

Is

true,

dzgmt.,u optrantu,

the

fatth

and

pzetr

ofthe

facrijicer,

and worker,

dignitatem confert operi,

conferres all the worth to the worke.

For ifan

Heatben

or

Tur~e

doe the fame

worke

of

Almes

or

mercy

that the

faithf,./l

Chriftian

doth, it fhall palfe without

all

regard<; whereas the

faithful! heart

and

per•

{M

makes the

worke

of the hand

•cceptable

to the L o

R D.

-

So then,[mijim ofgoodnelfe and

Almes

or

diftribtltioll

rhere mull:.be, they

are

necelfary to Salvation in them that have time and opporrunitie, and meanes : and

therefore

[ujficit adpemi:m meritu carm,

It is fufficienr

to

punijh

!#,

if wee

want good

wor!w.

But there can be no rru!l: or confidence placed in them ; for, they are un–

perfett and defective, and therefore

merit

nothing at Go o's hands out of

Iuffice,

bur onelyareaccepredoutof Goo's

mertie,

andtheinfinite.MeritofCH

a r s

T>

which is equal!

to

His Perfon tllat is infinite, as Hee is the eternall

Sonne

of G o o :

and

therefore,

Srtjficit adpr,emium, de meritis nonpr,eft<mere;

the greare!l: part of the

dignitie

of the befi

workes,

of the befi men, is to renounce all trull and confidence

in our felves, and our befl workes, and to repofe all our hope in the

mercy

and

merits

ofCH!lisT.

;

No~

to returneto the'ufe ofthe word

[Promeretnr:]

in

Antiquity,

I

remem.:

. bcr Saint

Cyprian

ufcrh it not for the

dignitie

and

merit

of

rhe

beft worke, but one–

, ly for the

way

or

meanes

ofobtaining. For, reading that pbce of Samt

Paul,

I

Ti!n.

I. X I II. [

B11t I obtainedmercie, becaufe I didit ig11ora11tly IIJunbelufe:

]

he reades

it

thus

.=

Sed 0fi{ericordiam mcrui :_ But 1merited uv.ercie :

what was

0/erui,.

ia

·

R

nrr

4

Saint

•'

. ~

t•

I

..

•I

·-~···

....

~~·-•,