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SUBJECT OF

THE

TREATISE.

XVII

the

gospel

in his

name.

But

such

a

claim

to

universal power

was

equivalent to

an

assertion of

his

deity.

It

was

a

power which

none

but

God could

possess

or

exercise,a

power which

he

could

not

possibly

transmit

to any creature, for no creature

was

capable of

sharing

it

with him,

the

gift of his

Father's

love,

and the

pecu-

liar purchase of his

own

blood

:

"

HIM

hath

God

highly

exalted,

and given him

a name

which

is above every

name,

that at the

name

of

Jesus

every

knee might

bow,

and

every

tongue

confess,

of

things

in

heaven,

and things in earth, and things

under the earth."

Such

was

the authority

of

Christ;

and had

it

been delegated to

the

apostles,

unto them

every

knee must

have

bowed,

and

every

tongue

con-

fessed,

not

only

in earth

and

under the

earth,

but

also

in

heaven!

Nay,

they must

have been " heads

over

all things to the church,"

which would be "

their

body,

the

fulness of

him

that

filleth all

in

all!"

Nay, farther,

the

saints and angels

of

heaven

must

have

in-

cluded

them in

their

doxologies, saying,

" Worthy

are

the

apostles

of

the

Lamb to

receive power,

and

riches,

and

wisdom,

and strength,

and

honour,

and

glory,

and blessing!"

Can

we

imagine

that

the

lowly

apostles ever aspired

to

such honours?

No! glorying

only

in

the

cross

of

their

Master,

they

never dreamt of

wielding his sceptre

or wearing his

crown.

" The

crown

of

glory"

which

they anticipated

was

that

due to

the

good

and

faithful servant after his work

and

warfare upon

earth; but the

idea

of governing

in

conjunction

with

Christ

in the

church below

they

would have

repudiated with

as

much

horror

as

they treated with

contempt

the

idea

of "

reigning

as

kings"

with

some conceited

members of

the

church

:

" Ye have

reigned

as

kings without us: and

I

would to God ye

did reign,

that

we also

might reign

with

you."

(1

Cor.

iv. 8.)

The

promise given

to

them

of

"

sitting upon twelve

thrones,

judging

the

twelve tribes of

Israel," in

whatever

sense

it

may have been understood by them,

they

certainly never expected to

see

realized

in any earthly enthro-

nization.

Of

this,

at

least, we

are certain,

that

the

idea

of

their

par-

ticipating in

the

mediatorial honours

of

their

Master

was

no

sooner

mooted,

in

the

rash petition

of

Zebedee's children,

than

it

was

put

down,

amidst

the

indignation

of

the

rest, by

the

calm

and

decided

sentence of

Christ:

"Ye

know

that

the

princes

of the

Gentiles

exercise dominion over

them, and they

that

are great

exercise

autho-

rity

upon

them

;

BUT

IT

SHALL

NOT

BE

SO AMONG

YOU."

(Matt.

xx. 25, 26.)

Here,

however,

it

may be necessary to

advert to another

source

of

the

fallacy,

in a

strange

confusion of

thought,

not

peculiar to

the

Romanist party, arising

from confounding

the

government of

the

VOL

L

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