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SUBJECT OF

THE TREATISE

XXV

that

he

has

been "made

a

judge

or

a

divider

over

them."

He

will

neither

sit

in judgment

over

the

conflicting claims of

the

kings

of

the

earth, nor

put

his

hand

to

the

partition

of

their

inheritances.

He

will

neither

crown

nor

discrown

them;

neither anoint nor

exor-

cise

them;

he

will

lay no interdicts

on

their

kingdoms,

nor

absolve

their

subjects from allegiance.

"Before him," indeed, "shall be

gathered all nations," and

to

him,

in

honour

of his

mediatorial

work, shall "

all

judgment"

be committed by the

Father; but

this

shall

not

be

till he

shall have "

put

down

all

rule,

and all autho-

rity, and all

power,"

and

men shall appear

before

him

stripped of all

earthly

jurisdiction.

Thus

it

appears

that

the

pope

claims, as

the

vicar and representative of

the Head

of

the

church, powers and

pre-

rogatives

with

which

the

Mediator himself has

not

been invested,

and

that

the

powers

and

prerogatives which

do

belong

to the

Mediator

are

such

as no

created being

could

possess

or

exercise.

Having

made these remarks,

which we consider essential

to the

right understanding

of

the

question,

we

may be prepared to judge

of

the

real

quarter

from which,

among

the

multiform pretensions

of

the

Papacy, danger

is

to be apprehended.

It

is

not

from

what has

been generally, and,

we

think,

mistakingly,

called

the temporal

power

of

the

pope,

meaning by

this

term his

prerogatives

as

a

sove-

reign, occupying

a

certain territory,

and "armed

with

a

little brief

authority" in

Rome.

Of this

adventitious distinction

there

are

not

a

few proofs

in

"the

signs

of

the times"

that

he

may

soon

be de-

nuded.

To suppose

that

Italy,

having

once

tasted the

cup of

liberty,

will

tamely

allow

it

to be dashed

from

her

lips,

that

she

will

much

longer submit to

see

the

best

of

her

children dragged

off before

her

eyes

to

the

dungeon

or

to

exile,

at

the

bidding of superannuated

superstition,

upheld by

foreign

bayonets,would

be contrary to all

the

experience of history

and

the

ordinary laws of

human nature. The

temporal sovereignty

of

the

pope, as

that

phrase has generally been

understood, is

now,

in

fact,

a nonentity. The

world

has

become

too

old

to be

dazzled

and

cajoled

by

the

spectacle of

a

crowned

priest

in

the

Vatican. Mere

earthly pomp and

local dignity,

so

omnipotent

during

the

dark

ages,

have

lost

their

virtue.

In

an earnest

and

spiri-

tual

age like

the

present, nothing can be expected to stand

that

is

not

based

on some

assumed moral or religious principle. Already

the

more knowing of

the

modern

advocates of

Rome are beginning

to

talk

of

the

papal supremacy

as

purely spiritual.

Their

language

is

almost

evangelical.

The pope

is

Christ;

his seat

is

no

longer on

the

seven

-

hilled

city,

but

on

the

rock of

St Peter;

his

Vatican

is

the

conscience of man.

The grade, and,

it

may

be,

the

final struggle,