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AUTHOR OF

THE

TREATISE.

XXIX

in

which

its

doctrines are

taught, and treatises

such as

that

of

Barrow, where

nothing

is

stated without

the

authority

being

given,

and

where

the

whole scheme is exposed

to

the

honest light of

day.

Before

speaking

of

the

Treatise

itself,

it

may be expected

that

we

should give some

account of

THE

AUTHOR OF

THE

TREATISE.

DR

ISAAC BARROW,

the author

of

the

following Treatise, was

born

in

London, October 1630.

He

was

the

son

of Mr Thomas

Barrow,

and grandson

of

Isaac

Barrow, Esq. of

Spiney

Abbey,

a

considerable

estate

in

Cambridgeshire.

His father,

who was

linen-draper to

Charles

I.

(an

office

which,

humble

as

it

was,

contributed, no doubt,

with other

considerations,

to attach him

to the

royal

family

and

to

the

Church of England),

followed

that

unfortunate

monarch to

Oxford,

and after

witnessing

the

tragic

scene of

his execution,

joined

Charles

II.

on

the

Continent, where he remained

till the

Restora-

tion. The

son

of

the

loyal linen

draper

was

early

sent to

the Charter-

house School,

and

destined for a scholar;

but

Isaac,

like

many

others

who

have distinguished themselves

in

that

capacity,

mani-

fested,

in his

boyish

days,

a

decided preference of

the

play

-

ground to

the

school-room.

His main talent lay in

pugilistic achievements,

and his

delight

was

to set

the

other

boys a-sparring.

He

was

re-

markable,

too, for

the

negligence of his

dress.

"

For

his

book,"

says

Mr

Abraham Hill,

"

he minded

it not;

nay,

there

was

then

so

little

appearance of

that

comfort which

his

father

afterwards received

from

him,

that

he

often solemnly wished

that

if it

pleased God

to

take

away

any

of his children,

it

might

be his

son Isaac.

"*

Seldom have

parental anticipations been

more

thoroughly

or

more agreeably disappointed.

Hardly had

Isaac

escaped from his

school

-

companions,

and entered

as

a student

at

Trinity

College

in

the

University

of Cambridge, which

he did in

1645,

than the

whole

man.,underwent

a

change.

The

reckless, careless

youth

became

an

ardent, indefatigable

scholar,

an

acute mathematician,

and a

pro-

found divine.

And

yet, even

under

this

metamorphosis,

it

is

not

difficult

to

discern,

in

the

subsequent history of

the

man,

some of

the

leading characteristics

of

the

boy.

His

negligence of

dress con-

tinued

with him to the last;

but

it

was

the

slovenliness no

longer

of

the

idle

truant, but

of

the

hard student. The

obstreperous sports

* Some

Accounts

of the

Life

of Dr Isaac Barrow, by Abraham Hill, Esq.,

prefixed

to Dr Tillotson's edition of

Barrow.