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XXX

INTRODUCTORY

ESSAS.

of youth

gave place

to

the

more

serious

encounters

of

mind with

mind; the

vivaciousness of

the lad

became courage

in the man;

and

early

combativeness found

a higher

sphere in

the

field

of religious

controversy. Two

instances of his personal

courage

are generally

recorded of him.

The

first occurred

during

his travels, when

the

ship

in

which he sailed for Constantinople

was

attacked by pirates;

and

Barrow, disdaining

the

shelter

of the

hold,

manfully fought

at

the

guns

on deck.

The other

was

an encounter with

a

furious

mastiff, which, having

rushed upon him in

the

dark, he

seized

by

the

throat,

and,

rather than

kill

the

animal,

held

it

fast to

the

ground

till

he

was

released.

True to

the paternal

creed, Barrow, on

entering the

university,

refused

to take the

covenant;

but this

refusal,

though

at that

time

regarded

as

the mark

of

a

" Malignant,"

or one who

had

espoused

the

principles of

Laudean

prelacy in

the

church

and arbitrary

power

in

the

state,

was

kindly

connived

at

by

the

heads

of

the

university. One

day,

Dr

Hill, Master

of

Trinity

College,

laying his

hand

on his

head,

said, " Thou

art

a

good

lad; 'tis pity

thou

art

a

Cavalier." On an-

other

occasion,

when Barrow

had

displeased

the

rest by giving too

free

scope

to

his predilections,

their

objections were overruled by

the

same good man, who observed,

"Barrow

is

a better

man

than

any

of

us."

The

occasion

of

this

offence,

it

is said, was

his

Latin

Oration

on

the

Gunpowder Plot,

which

is

now

inserted in his

works.

There

is

nothing in this

performance

(which

is

written in

a youthful,

decla-

matory

style)

that

could

justly

have

given umbrage, unless

we

sup-

pose

that

his description of

the

state

of

the

church

during the reign

of

James VI.

was too

highly

coloured

for

the taste

of

the

Presby-

terians, and

that,

in adverting to

the

design of

the

conspirators

to cut

off

the

royal family,

he

expressed

himself in terms

too

applicable to

Cromwell to

be

relished

by

the

Independents. Speaking

of

the

episcopal

church

in

those

times,

he

says,

"There

was

hardly

any

thing in her

that

pride

could

despise,

that

calumny

could accuse, or

that

well-regulated minds

could find wanting.

She admitted neither

old

corruptions

nor

new

-

fangled

fancies.

Simple

she was

indeed,

and yet

not

destitute

of those

ornaments with

which

ancient piety

and

well

-

consulted prudence

had

furnished her."

If

we

may

judge

from

another

oration, pronounced

in April

1651,

in

which

he

severely

inveighs

against

the

immoderate

love

of fun, wit,

and ribaldry,

which

then

prevailed among his

fellow

-

collegians (giving

us,

by

the

way,

a

very different

idea

of

the Puritans

of

that

period from

that

con-

veyed by

the

morose

pictures drawn

of

them

by

their

opponents),

it

would

appear

that

our author,

even

at

the

early

age

of twenty

-one,