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REASONS AGAINST

THE

ROMISH NOTION OF UNITY.

399

the

guides of

particular churches;

but the

honour and

obedience

due

to

those

paramount authorities,

or universal governors, is passed

over

in

dead

silence, as

if

no

such

thing had

been

thought

of.

They

expressly

avow

the

secular pre-eminence, and press submis-

sion

to

the

emperor as supreme; why

do

they not

likewise

mention

this

no

less

considerable ecclesiastical supremacy or enjoin obedience

thereunto?

Why

"

Honour

the

king," and "

Be subject to principa-

lities,"

so

often,

but

" Honour the spiritual

prince or

senate"

never

occurs?

Rom.

xiii.

1;

Titus

iii.

1;

1

Pet.

ii.

13,

17;

1

Tim.

ii. 1, 2.

If

there had been any

such

authority,

there

would

probably have

been

some

intimation

concerning

the

persons

in

whom

it

was

settled,

concerning

the

place of

their

residence, concerning

the

manner

of its

being

conveyed,

by

election,

succession,

or otherwise.

Probably

the

persons would

have

some

proper name, title,

or cha-

racter

to

distinguish

them

from inferior governors;

[it

is

probable]

that

to

the

place some

mark

of pre-

eminence would have been

affixed.

It

is

not

unlikely

that

somewhere some

rules or directions

would

have been prescribed

for

the

management

of

so

high a trust,

for

pre-

venting

miscarriages

and

abuses,

to

which

it

is

notoriously liable.

It

would have

been declared

absolute, or

the

limits

of

it

would

have

been

determined,

to prevent its

enslaving God's heritage.

But

of these

things

in the

apostolical writings, or

in

any

near

those

times,

there

does

not appear any

footstep or

pregnant

intimation.

There

has

never to

this

day been any place

but

one (namely,

Rome) which

has pretended to be

the

seat of

such

an authority;

the plea

whereof

we

largely have examined.*

At

present

we

shall only

observe,

that

before

the

Roman church

was

founded,

there

were churches otherwhere.

There

was

a

great

church

at Jerusalem

;1

which

indeed

was

the "mother

ofall churches,

'

and

was

by

the

fathers

so

styled, however

Rome now arrogates to

herself

that

title.

Acts

ii.

41, 47,

iv. 4,

vi. 1, viii.

1.

There

were

issuing from

that

mother

a

fair

offspring

of churches (those

of

Judea,

of Galilee, of Samaria, of

Syria

and

Cilicia,

of divers

other

places)

before

there

was

any church

at

Rome,

or

that

St Peter

did

come

thither,

which

was

at

least

divers

years after our

Lord's

ascension.'

Acts

ix.

31,

xv. 41, xi. 19, viii.

1;

1

Cor. xvi.

1,

19

;

Rom.

xvi.

4.

St Paul

was

converted;

....

after

five

[three]

years

he went to

Jeru-

salem,

then

St Peter

was

there;

after fourteen

years

thence he went

to

Jerusalem

again,

and

then St Peter

was

there;

after

that

he met with

St Peter at

Antioch.

Gal.

i.

18, 19,

ii.

1,

9,

11.

Where

then

was

Referring to his

Treatise

on

the

Supremacy, pp. 203,

&c.

ED.

s

'EvrxsAúvsro

Apropos amv

patinvrmv

iv'Ispoveakm¡.c

ç i,,a.

Acts

vi. 7.

Mñprnp

iavrasav

Trov

íMXZna,GI, ,i iv

`Iiporoxú¡<as.

Cone.

Const.

in

Synod.

Ep.

Theod.

v. 9.

s

Vales.

in

Euseb.

ii. 16.