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ROMISH

UNITY

OPPOSED

TO

THE GENIUS OF THE

GOSPEL.

403

7.

This political

unity

does

not

well accord

with

the

nature and

genius of

the

evangelical dispensation.

Our Saviour

affirmed

that

" his

kingdom

is

not

of

this

world,"

John

xviii.

36;

and

St Paul

tells

us

that

it

consists

in

a spiritual in-

fluence

upon

the

souls

of men, producing in

them

virtue, spiritual

joy, and

peace, Rom.

xiv. 17.

It

disavows

and discountenances "

the

elements

of

the

world,"

by

which worldly designs are carried on

and

worldly frames sustained.

Gal.

iv. 3,

9;

Col.

ii.

20.

It

requires

not to be managed by

politic artifices or

"fleshly

wis-

dom,"

but

by simplicity, sincerity,

plain

dealing,

1

Pet.

ii.

1.

As every

subject

of

it

must

"lay

mide

all guile and

dissimulation,"

so

espe-

cially

the

officers

of

it

must

do

so,

in

conformity

to

the

apostles, who

"

had

their

conversation

in

the

world"

(and

prosecuted

their

design)

"in

simplicity and godly sincerity,

not

with

fleshly wisdom,

but

by

the

grace of God

;"

not " walking

in craftiness,"

or " handling

the

word of

God

deceitfully,"

&c.

-2

Cor.

i.12,

ii.

17,

iv.

2;

1

Thess.

ii.

3,

5.

It

needs

not

to

be supported

or enlarged

by wealth

and pomp, or

by

compulsive

force

and

violence;

for

"

God

hath

chosen

the

foolish

things

of

the

world

to

confound

the

wise,

and

the

weak

things

of

the

world

to

confound

the

mighty, and

base,

despicable

things,"

&c.,

"that

no flesh

should glory

in

his

presence.

"

-1

Cor.

i.

27

-29;

James

ii.

5.

And,

" The

weapons of our warfare

are not carnal,

but

mighty

through

God,"

&c.

-2

Cor.

x. 4.

It

discountenances

the

imposition of new

laws

and precepts, beside

those which

God

has

enjoined, or which

are

necessary

for order and

edification,

derogating

from

the liberty

of

Christians and from

the

simplicity

of

our

religion.

Matt.

xv.

9;

Col.

ii.

8, 20,

21;

Gal.

iv. 10.

The government of

the

Christian state

is

represented [as] purely

spiritual; administered by meek

persuasion,

not

by

imperious awe;

as

an

humble ministry,

not

as

stately domination

;

for

the

apostles

themselves

did not "

lord

it

over

men's faith,"

but

"

co-

operated

to

their

joy,"

2

Cor.

i.

24.

They did

"not

preach themselves,

but

Christ

Jesus to

be

the Lord; and

themselves

their

servants

for

Jesus'

sake,"

2 Cor.

iv. 5.

It

is

expressly forbidden to

them

to " domineer

over God's people,"

1

Pet.

v.

3;

Matt.

xx. 25, 26.

They are to

be qualified

with gentleness

and patience; they are

forbidden to

"

strive,"

and

enjoined

to be

"

gentle

toward all,

apt

to

teach,

patient, in

meekness

instructing

those

that

oppose

themselves."

2

Cor. vi.

4;

1

Tim.

iii.

3

;

2

Tim.

ii.

24,

25;

Tit.

ii. 2.

They are

"to

convince,

to rebuke, to exhort, with all

long-

suffer-

ing and

doctrine.

"1

Chrys.

Isid.;

2

Tim.

iv. 2.

1

Episcopus

pr

Best

volentibus, non nolentibus.

Hier.

Ep. iii.

ad

Nepo

;.