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404

DISCOURSE'

ON

THE UNITY

OF

THE CHURCH.

They

are furnished with no arms beside

the "

divine

panoply;"

they

bear

no "

sword"

but that

" of

the

Spirit,

which is

the

word

of

God," Eph.

vi.

17;

...

they may

teach, reprove,

....

they

cannot

compel.

They

are

not to

be entangled in

the

cares of

this

life3

-2

Tim.

ii.

4.

But

supposing

the

church

was designed to

be

one

in this man-

ner

of political regiment,

it

must be quite another thing, nearly

resembling

a

worldly state, yea,

in

effect soon

resolving

itself into

such

an

one.

Supposing, as is now

pretended,

that

its

manage-

ment

is

committed to an

ecclesiastical monarch,

it must

become

a

worldly

kingdom;

for such

a polity

could

not

be

upheld

with-

out

applying

the

same

means

and

engines,

without practising

the

same methods and arts, whereby

secular

governments are main-

tained.'

Its

majesty must be supported by

conspicuous

pomp

and phan-

tastry

[fantasy].

Its

dignity and

power

must be

supported by

wealth;

which

it

must

corrade [scrape

together] and accumulate by

large

incomes,

by

exaction

of

tributes

and taxes.

It

must exert authority in enacting of

laws for

keeping its state

in

order and securing its interests, backed with rewards and

pains;

especially considering,

its title being

so

dark, and grounded

on

no

clear warrant, many

always will contest it.

It

must apply constraint and

force,

for

procuring

obedience

and

correcting

transgression.

It

must

have guards,

to

preserve

its

safety

and

authority.

It

must be engaged

in

wars,

to

defend

itself and make

good

its

interests.

It

must

use

subtlety and

artifice, for

promoting its interests, and

[to] countermine

the

policies

of adversaries.

It

must erect judicatories, and must

decide causes

with formality

of

legal process; whence tedious

suits,

crafty pleadings, quirks of

law

and

pettifoggeries,

fees

and

charges,

extortion

and barratry,

&c.,

will necessarily creep

in.'

All

which

things much

disagree from

the

original

constitution

and

design of

the

Christian

church, which

is averse

from pomp, re-

jects

domination,

does

not require

craft, wealth, or

force,

to main-

'

'Avalia5,

mi7r

9ravavr).íar

ea.

Eph.

vi. 18.

2

Moixl,'ma

yáp

i<xávma,v Xpivmravo7

aim

ipsílrai

vrph

alar

E9raY0pAo

,

ma vmr

61-"Tra'6v`r*r

sraíOp:a1.a,

&o.

Chrys.

de

Sacerd.

ü.

'E,,-

bAa ob

a1461,ErOr,

¿,X.Xei 9rEMOS,14

9rway

r<tooívo,

1.4

mo,or,mov.

Ibid.

3

"E1.Epár

mi

vrapá

1.ác vroXprixáç

Awls

of

ilmovroc._Arist.

Pol.

IV.

15.

4

Is

modus

qui

frequentatur

execrabilis plane, et

qui

non

dico ecclesiam, sed nee

forum deceret,

&c.

Bern.

de

Consid. i. 9.

Attendens itaque

S.

synodus, quod

spiri-

tualia

sine

carnalibus sustineri

nequeant.

Syn.

Bas.

secs.

xlii.

p.

108.