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INCONVENIENCE AND INEXPEDIENCY

OF ROMISH UNITY.

405

tain

it;

but

did

at

first,

and

[still] may,

subsist

without any

such

means.'

I

do

not

say

that

an

ecclesiastical society

may

not

lawfully, for

its

support,

use power, policy,

wealth, in

some

measure,

to uphold

or

defend itself;

but

that

a

constitution needing such things

is

not

divine, or

that,

so

far as

it

uses

them,

it

is

no more

than

human.

Thus,

in

effect, we see

that it

has

succeeded, from

the

pretence

of

this

unity;

which

has indeed transformed

the

church

into

a

mere

worldly

state, wherein

the

monarch

beareth

the

garb

of

an

emperor,

in external

splendour surpassing all worldly

princes, crowned

with

a

triple

crown.'

He

assumes

the

most

haughty titles

of

" Our

most holy Lord,"

"The

Vicar general of Christ,"

&c.;

and

he

suffers

men to

call

him

" The Monarch

of

Kings,"

&c.

He

has respects

paid him

like to which no

potentate

assumes,

having

his

feet

kissed,

riding upon the

backs of men,

letting

princes

hold his

stirrup and

lead his horse.'

He

has

a

court,

and

is

attended

with a

train

of courtiers surpass-

ing in state

and

claiming precedence to

the

peers

of

any

kingdom.`

He

is

encompassed

with armed

guards,

Switzers.

He

has a vast revenue, supplied by

tributes and

imposts

sore

and

grievous,

the

exaction of which has made divers

nations

of

Christen-

dom

to groan most lamentably.

He

has raised numberless wars

and

commotions for

the

promotion

and advancement

of his interests.

He

administers things with all

depth

of

policy

to

advance his de-

signs.

He

has enacted

volumes

of

laws

and

decrees,

to

which obedience

is

exacted with rigour and

forcible

constraint.'

He

draws

grist

from

all

parts

to his courts of

judgment,

wherein

all formalities

of suspense, all

the

tricks of squeezing

money,

&c.,

are practised, to

the great

trouble

and

charge of parties concerned.

Briefly,

it

is

plain

that

he

exercises

the

proudest, mightiest,

subtlest domination

that

ever

was

over

Christians.'

8.

The union

of

the

whole

church in

one body,

under

one govern-

ment

or sovereign

authority,

would be

inconvenient and hurtful,

'

Omnis

pulchritudo

ß1iæ

regis

intrinsecus.Aug.

Ep. ]xviii.

2

One

crown

doth

serve an emperor,

but

he

must

have a

triple:

to kiss

the

hands

of a king is a

sufficient respect,

but

you cannot salute him without kissing

"his

blessed

feet."

8

That

which Seneca did

take

for

a

piece

of enormous pride in

Caligula.

De

Benef.

ii. 12.

Carden. vid.

Uss. p.

103.

Sub

mortali. He

imposes

rigorous oaths of fealty and

obedience.

e

Exaltatio,

;et

inflatio,

et arrogans

ac

superba jactatio,

non de

Christi

magisterio,

qui

humilitatem

docet, sed de

Antichristi spiritu

nascitur.

Cypr.,

Ep.

lv.

ad

P.

Cored.