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ARGUMENTS FOR ROMISH

UNITY

ANSWERED.

407

like

perspicuity), advanced

by a late

divine of

great

repute, and

col-

lected

out

of his

writings with

some care,

are those

which, briefly

proposed,

do follow,

together with

answers

declaring

their

invalidity.

Arg.

I.

The name " church"

is

attributed

to

the

whole body of

Christians, which implies unity.

Ep.,

p.

38;

Lat.,

p.

114.

Ans.

This, indeed, implies an

unity

of

the

church,

but

determines

not the

kind

or

ground thereof,

there

being

several

kinds of unity.

One of

those which

we

have touched,

or several, or

all of

them, may

suffice

to

ground

that

comprehensive appellation.

Arg.

II.

Our

creeds

import

the

belief

of

such

an

unity:

for

in

the

Apostolical

we

profess

to

believe

"The

holy catholic

church;"

in

the

Constantinopolitan,

"The

holy catholic"

and "apostolic

church."

Ep.

;

Lat.

p.

144.

Ans.

1.

The

most ancient summaries

of

Christian faith

extant in

the

first fathers,

Irenus,

Tertullian,

Cyprian,

&c.,

do

not

contain

this

point.

Iren.;

Tert.;

Cypr.;

Cone.

Nic.

The

word

"catholic"

was

not

originally

in

the

Apostolical or Ro-

man

Creed,

but

was

added after

Ruffin

and St Augustine's

time.

This

article

was

inserted into

the

creeds upon

the

rise of heresies

and

schisms,

to discountenance and

disengage from

them.

Ans.

2.

We

avow

a "catholic

church" in many respects one; where-

fore,

not the unity

of

the

church,

but the

kind

and manner

of

unity,

being

in question,

the

creed

does

not

oppose

what

we say,

nor can

with

reason

be alleged

for

the

special

kind

of

unity

which is

pretended.

Ans.

3.

That the unity

mentioned in

the

Constantinopolitan

Creed

is

such as our adversaries contend

for,

of

external

policy, is

precariously assumed,

and

relies only upon

their interpretation

ob-

truded

on

us.

Ans.

4.

The genuine meaning

of

that

article may reasonably

be

deemed

this: That

we profess

our

adhering

to

the

body of Christians,

which,

diffused over

the

world,

retains

the faith taught, the

discipline

settled,

the

practices appointed, by our Lord

and his

apostles;

that

we

maintain general charity toward

all

good

Christians;

that

we

are

ready to entertain

communion

in

holy

offices

with all such;

that

we

are willing to

observe

the

laws

and

orders established

by authority

or

consent

of

the

churches, for

maintenance

of

truth,

order,

and

peace;

that

we

renounce all heretical

doctrines,

all disorderly prac-

tices, all conspiracy

with any

factious combinations of people. Ilapa-

euvayayaí.

Ans.

5.

That

this

is

the

meaning

of

the

article may

sufficiently

appear

from

the

reason

and

occasion

of introducing

it,

which

was

to

secure

the

truth

of

Christian

doctrine,

the

authority of

ecclesiastical

discipline,

and

the

common peace of

the

church;

according

to

the

discourses

and arguments

of

the

fathers,

Irenus,

Tertullian,

St