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ARGUMENTS

FOR ROMISH UNITY ANSWERED.

409

Ans.

1.

That

all

churches are

bound

to observe

the

same divine

institutions

argues only

an

unity

of

relation to

the

same heavenly

King,

or

a

specifical

unity and

similitude

of policy

;

the

which

we

avow.

-1

Cor. xi. 16.

Ans.

2.

We

also acknowledge

it

convenient

and

decent

that

all

churches,

in

principal

observances

introduced by human prudence,

should

agree

so

near

as

may be; an uniformity in

such

things

repre-

senting and

preserving

unity

of faith, of

charity,

of peace.

Whence

the

governors of

the

primitive church endeavoured

such

an uniformity;

as

the

fathers

of

Nice

profess in

the

canon forbidding

of genuflection

on

Lord's

-days

and

on

the

days of

Pentecost.'

Ans.

3.

Yet

does

not

such

an

agreement,. or

attempt

at

it, infer

a

political

unity;

no more

than

when all men, by

virtue

of

a primitive

general

tradition,

were

tied

to

offer sacrifices

and

oblations

to

God,

that

consideration

might

argue all men to have been

under

the

same

government;

or no

more

than the

usual agreement

of

neighbour na-

tions in

divers fashions concludes such

an unity.

Ans.

4.

In

divers customs

and

observances several churches varied,

with

allowance; which

rather

infers

a

difference of polity,

than

agree-

ment

in

other

observances

argues

au unity thereof.'

Ans.

5.

St

Cyprian

affirms

that

in

such

matters

every bishop

had

a

power

to

use his own discretion,

without being

obliged

to

comply

with

others. Cypr., Ep.

lxxiii.

Arg. VI.

The Jewish church

was one

corporation,

and in

corre-

spondence

thereto the Christian

church should be

such.

Ep.,

p.

39;

Lat.,

p.

159.

Ans.

1.

As

the

Christian church

does

in

some

things

correspond

to

that

of

the

Jews,

so

it

differs

in

others,

being designed to

excel

it;

wherefore,

this argumentation

cannot be

valid,

and

may

as

well

be

employed for our opinion

as

against

it.

Ans.

2.

In

like manner

it

may

be

argued

that

all Christians

should annually meet in

one

place;

that

all Christians should have

one

archpriest

on

earth;

that

we

should all be subject

to

one

tem-

poral

jurisdiction;

that

we

should all speak

one

language,

&c.

Ans.

3.

There

is

a great

difference in

the

case; for

the

Israelites

1

závza

lv

a-áon

xapaod

ópeoí1

00.Zorr,ç

#,a.--GanC.

Nie., can.

xx.;

Vide

de

Paschate.

®

Vide

Aug,

Ep. lxxxvi.,

ad Casul.;

Ep. cxviii.,

ad

Jan.;

Cypr., Ep. lxxv.,

p.

198;

Iren.,

apud

Euseb.

v.

24;

Socr. v. 22,

vii.

19.

Cetera jam

discipline et

conversationis

admittunt

novitatem

correctionis, hac lege manente,

&c.

Tert.

de

Virg.

vel

Thorn.

Lat.,

p.

219;

P.

Greg.

L.

In

una

fide

nihil

officit

sundae ecclesie consuetudo diversa.

P.

Greg.

I.,

Ep.

i.

41;

P.

Leo

IX.,

Ep.

i. cap.

xxix.

Nil obsunt saluti credentium

diverse

pro

loco

et tempore

consuetudines, quando

una

fides

per

dilectionem operans

bona quæ potest

uni

Deo

commendat

omnes.P.

Nie.

I,

Pp.

vi. De consuetudinibus

quidem, quem nobis opponere visi estis, scribentes

per

diversas

ecclesias

diversas else

consuetudines,

si

illis canonica

non

resistit auctoritas,

pro

qua

eis obviare debeamus,

nil

judicamus

vel eis

resistimus,

&c.