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ARGUMENTS FOR ROMISH UNITY ANSWERED.

411

each

other by

formed, communicatory, pacificatory, commendatory,

synodical

epistles.

Ep.,

p.

69;

Lat.,

p.

222.'

Ans.1.

This

signifies

that

the

churches,

by admonition,

advice,

&c.,

helped

one

another in maintenance

of the

common

faith, endeavoured

to

preserve charity, friendship,

and

peace.

This

is

all

which

thence

may be

concluded.

Ans.

2.

Secular princes are wont to send ambassadors and

envoys

with letters and instructions

for

settlement

of correspondence

and

preserving peace;

they

sometimes recommend

their

subjects to

other

princes;

they

expect

offices

of

humanity

toward

their

subjects travel-

ling

or

trading

anywhere in

the

world

;

common reason

requires such

things; but

may

common

union

of

polity

from

hence

be inferred?

Arg.

X.

The

effectual

preservation of

unity in the

primitive church

is

alleged

as

a strong argument of its being

united in

one

govern

-

ment.Ep.,

p.

64;

Lat.,

p.

221.

Ans.

1.

That

unity

of

faith, and charity, and

discipline, which we

admit,

was

indeed

preserved,

not

by influence of any one sovereign

authority,

whereof

there

is

no mention,

but

by the concurrent

vigi-

lance of bishops, declaring

and disputing against any novelty in

doc-

trine

or

practice

which

did

start,

up;

by

their

adherence to

the

doc-

trine

asserted

in

Scripture and

confirmed

by

tradition;

by

their

aiding and abetting

one

another

as

confederates

against errors and

disorders creeping

in.

Ans.

2.

The many

differences which arose concerning

the

observa-

tion

of

Easter,

the

rebaptization

of heretics,

the

reconciliation of re-

volters

and

scandalous criminals, concerning

the

decision of causes

and

controversies,

&c.,

more clearly

show

that

there

was

no

standing

common

jurisdiction in the church;

for

had

there

been such

an

one,

recourse would

have been

had thereto, and

such differences by

its

authority

would easily

have been quashed.

Arg. XI. Another argument

is

grounded

on

the

relief

which one

church yielded

to another,

which

supposes

all churches

under

one

government, imposing

such

tribute.

Ep.,

p.

119;

Lat.,

p.

209.

Ans.

1.

This

is

a

strange fetch,

as

if

all

who were

under

obligation

1

Liter

formatee.

Optat.

ii.;

Conc. Miley.,

can.

xx. Communicatoriæ.

Aug.,

Ep.

clxii., clxiii.

Kai

reZ

srapá

Token,

551 ,

eza.

Euseb.

vii.

30;

Cypr.,

Ep.

Iv.

lxvii.

rpáps-

puara 000rarez

í.

Apost. Can.

xii.

Elp

oo.aí.

Cone.

Chale.,

can. xi.

xuvohzal.

Soo.

vii.

11

;

Cone.

VI.

Act.

11, p.

158, 198, 223

;

Greg. M.,

Ep.

P.

Zach.,

Baron., ann.

743, sect. 29. Significa plane nobis

quis in

locum

Marciani Arelate

fuerit substitutus,

ut

sciamus

ad

quem

fratres

nostros dirigere, et cui scribere debenmus,

&c.

Cypr.

Ep.

xlii.

llvii.,

ad

P.

Steph., p.

161;

Ep.

lv.

N.

B.,

p.

113.

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&C.

Alexandri Ep.

Socr. i. 6.

"The

catholic

church

being

one

body,

there

being, moreover,

a

command

in the

holy

Scriptures to preserve the

bond

of

peace

and

concord

;

hence

it

follows,

that

what things

(happen to, or)

are

done

by any

of us,

we

ought to

write and

signify

to each other."