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414

DISCOURSE

ON

THE UNITY

OF

THE CHURCH.

1.

We

assert

that

every church is

bound to

observe

the

institutions

of

Christ, and

that

sort of government which

the

apostles ordained,

consisting of

bishops, priests,

and

people.

2.

We

avow

it

expedient

(in

conformity

to the primitive

churches,

and in order to the maintenance of

truth,

order, peace)

for

several

particular

churches or parishes to be combined

in political

corpora-

tions,

as

shall be found convenient

by those

who

have

just

authority

to

frame such corporations; for

that

otherwise

Christianity, being

shattered into numberless

shreds, could

hardly

subsist,

and

that

great

confusions

must

arise.

3.

We

affirm

that,

such bodies

having been established and being

maintained by

just

authority,

every

man

is

bound to endeavour

the

upholding

of

them, by

obedience,

by

peaceable

and

compliant

de-

meanour.

4.

We

acknowledge

it

a great

crime,

by

factious

behaviour in them,

or

by

needless

separation from them, to disturb them,

to

divide

them,

to

dissolve

or

subvert

them.'

Jude

19,

o;

cceroSropí

ovrsç.

5.

We

conceive

it

fit

that

every people

under

one

prince

(or

at

least of

one

nation, using

the

same language,

civil law,

and

fashions)

should be

united

in the bands

of ecclesiastical

polity;

for

that

such

a

unity apparently

is

conducible

to

the

peace

and

welfare

both

of

church and state, to

the furtherance

of God's worship and

service,

to

the

edification of people in

charity and piety, by

the

encouragement

of secular powers, by

the

concurrent

advice

and aid

of ecclesiastical

pastors, by

many advantages hence arising.'

6.

We

suppose

all

churches obliged

to

observe

friendly communion,

and, when

occasion

invites,

to aid

each

other

by

assistance

and

ad-

vice,

in

synods

of bishops

or

otherwise.

7.

We

affirm

that

all churches are

obliged

to

comply

with

lawful

decrees and

orders,

appointed in

synods

with consent

of

their

bishops,

and

allowed

by

the

civil

authorities under

which

they

live

;

as,

if

the

bishops of

Spain and

France

assembling should agree

upon

constitu-

tions of

discipline which

the

kings

of

both

those countries should ap-

prove,

and

which should

not thwart

God's

laws,

both

those churches,

and every man in them,

were

bound

to comply

in

observance of

them.

From

the

premises divers corollaries may be deduced:

-

1.

Hence

it

appears

that

all those clamours of

the

pretended

I

We

allow

the

Apost. Can. xxxi.c

ET

4iç

xarappovn'oas

40ú ióíou

lxmxóarou

xv,is

oava-

yáyn, zai

.`luovaO,rñ+vov

i

ip

i,

91-Ìm, p.

Olv

xa4£yvaux

ç

70L ivrICxÓ9r,u iv

sboi

E1á

%af

8xaoo'úvr

xaAa

ys:4v,

«s

píT.apxoç, &c.

If

any

person, despising

his

own bishop,

shall set up a

separate meeting and build another

altar,

having nothing to condemn

in

his

bishop,

either

for his

piety or uprightness, let

him

be

deposed

as

one

that

ambitiously

affects

to

be

a

governor,"

&c.

2

.7ízalav

aúv

loot

areiv4aç

I'

04

iv

v

'Pal(caimv

xórtcap

li

aoxaañouç 4oú

vítvou

,,iry

alp;

Tor; vó¡cou ppovv7v,

xai

f4i7

levpópo,s

Mavxaa,íaiç

4ñv

, 'çr,v

,araív,,v.

Syn.

Rom.,

apud

Theed.

ü.

22.