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418

DISCOURSE

ON

THE UNITY

OF

THE

CHURCH.

The

words of

Synesius

are

remarkable.

He

having

excommuni-

cated some cruel

oppressors,

thus

recommends

the

case

to

all Chris-

tians:

" The church of Ptolemais

has

thus

arranged with

the

breth-

ren throughout the

world.

If

any

despise

the

church,

and

shall

receive those

proscribed

by it,

let

him

know

that

this

is

to rend

the

church, which

Christ

would

have to be

one,"

&c.'

Upon

which

grounds

I

do

not

scruple

to

affirm

the

recusants

in

England

to be no

less

schismatics

than any

other separatists.' They

are,

indeed, somewhat

worse

:

for

most others only forbear communion;

these rudely condemn

the

church

to

which

they

owe

obedience, yea,

strive

to

destroy

it;

they

are most desperate rebels against it.*

8.

It

is

the

duty and interest of

all churches to disclaim

the

pre-

tences of

the

Roman

court,

maintaining

their

liberties and rights

against its usurpations;

for compliance

therewith,

as

it

greatly preju-

dices

truth

and

piety, leaving

them to

be corrupted

by the

ambitious,

covetous,

and voluptuous

designs

of those men,

so

it

removes

the

genuine

unity

of

the

church and peace

of

Christians,unless

to be

tied by

compulsory chains, as

slaves,

be deemed

unity

or

peace.

9.

Yet

those churches which,

by

the

voluntary

consent or

com-

mand of

princes,

adhere in confederation to

the

Roman

church, we

are not, merely upon

that

score,

to condemn

or

reject

from com-

munion

of

charity

or

peace;

for

in

that

they

do

but

use

their

liberty.

10.

But if

such

churches

maintain

impious

errors; if

they

prescribe

naughty

practices;

if they

reject communion and

peace

upon reason-

able

terms; if they vent unjust

and uncharitable censures;

if they

are

turbulent

and

violent, striving

by all means

to subdue

and

enslave

other

churches to

their

will or

their

dictates; if they damn and per-

secute all who refuse

to be

their

subjects,

in

such cases we

may

reject

such

churches as heretical, or schismatical, or wickedly

uncha-

ritable and

unjust

in

their

proceedings.'

1

'Evri

roúmors ,j

IraXelhá3os ixxxnaia

Teas

rpás má0

ávrarraxov' yñs

iavrñs

00.04s

araTárTSTar

&c.

Ei

vi

Trs

w`s

przpovra2.7mry

ávraa,

vIailasr

Tmv

ixxXnafa,,

xal

,/ai vrcer

Tabs

áoroxnpówrovs

a,Tñç

(proscribed by

it)

m;

elm

áváyxv

Tñ vrivnTar

vrasaAar,

r''."

axle's

747,

ixxT.naiav,

riv

¡a'a,

ó

Xprasás

Jar

ßalasw,

&c.

Ep.

lviii.,

p.

203,

edit. Petay.

a

P.

Leo,

Ep. lxxxiv.

cap. 9.

*

By

"

the

recusants

in

England," Barrow plainly

means Romaniste,

in distinction

from

Protestant

Dissenters, whom he calls "

other separatists."

En.

8

Cuicunque hreresi communicans merito

judicatur

a nostra

societate

removendus.

Gelas.,

Ep. i.,

ad

Euphem.

An

communicare, non est consentire cum

talibus

P

P.

Sym.

I.,

Ep. vii.

THE

END.

PRINTED

BY

BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY

EDINBURGH AND LONDON