Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  54 / 470 Next Page
Basic version Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 54 / 470 Next Page
Page Background

Ú

I_TITRODIICTION.

infinite power; because

great

is

the

Lord, and

great

is

his

power,

and

of his greatness

there

is

no end.

'

1

This

is

the

doctrine which

the

leading theologue of

their

sect,

their

angelical doctor [Thomas Aquinas]

affirms,

both

directly,

saying

that

" in

the

pope

is

the

top of both powers,"

and by

plain

conse-

quence, asserting

that

" when any

one is

denounced excommunicated

for apostasy, his subjects are immediately freed from his dominion,

and

their

oath of

allegiance

to him."

This

the

same Thomas

(or

an

author

passing

under

his name,

in

his book

touching

the Rule

of Princes)

teaches, affirming

that

the

pope,

"

as supreme

king

of all

the

world,

may

impose

taxes

on all

Christians,

and

destroy towns

and

castles for

the

preservation of

Christianity."

5

This,

as

Cardinal Zabarella,

near three hundred

years

ago,

tells

us, is

the

doctrine "

which, for

a

long time,

those

who would please

popes

persuaded them,

that

they

could do

all things, whatever

they

pleased, yea,

and things

unlawful,

and

so

could

do

more

than

God."

According

to

this

doctrine,

then

current

at

Rome,

in the

last La-

teran

great

synod,

under the

pope's

nose

and

in his ear, one

bishop

styled him

"

Prince of

the

world ;"5

another

orator called

him " King

of

kings, and

monarch

of

the earth

;

"s

another great prelate

said of

him,

that

"

he had all

power above all

powers,

both

of

heaven

and

earth.

"'

And

the

same roused up

Pope Leo

X.

in these brave terms:

"Snatch

up, therefore,

the

two-edged sword of

divine power

com-

mitted

to thee, and

enjoin, command,

and

charge

that

an

universal

1

Scripsit

egregiam summamde potestate

ecclesim.

Bell.

de

Script., anno 1301.

Error

est, non credere pontificem

Rom.

universalis

ecclesise

pastorem,

Petri

successorem,

et

Christi

vicarium,

supra temporalia et spiritualia universalem non habere primatum; in

quem quandoque

multi labuntur,

dictse

potestatis ignorantia

;

qua, cum

sit

infinita,

eo

quad

magnus

est

Dominus,

et

magna virtus

ejus, et

magnitudinis

ejus no est

finis, omnis

creatus intelleetus in ejus perscrutatione invenitur

deficere.Aug.

Triumph.

de

Potest.

Eccl.

in

prcef.

ad-P.

Toh.

XXII.

2

Thomas

in

fine Seeun.

Sentent. dieit

in

papa

esse

apicem

utriusque

potestatis.

Bell., vol. i.

Quum quis

per sententiam denunciatur propter

apostasiam excommuni.

catus,

ipso

facto ejus

subditi a

dominio,

et juramento fidelitatis ejus

liberati

sunt.

Th., ii. Secund. qu.

12,

art.

2.

5

S.

Thomas (in lib.

iii.

de

Regim.

Prins.,

cap. 10, 19)

affirmat summum

pontificem

jure

divino

habere spiritualem

et

temporalem potestatem,

ut

supremum

totius

mundi

regem, adeo

ut

etiam taleas omnibus Christianis possit

imponere,

et

civitates

ac

castra

destruere

pro

conservation

Christianitatis.Bell.,

vol. v.

'

Qum

jura

aunt notanda,

quia

male

considerata aunt per multos assentatores, qui

voluerunt placere

pontificibus,

per

multa retro

tempora,

et

usque ad hodierna suaserunt

eis,

quod omnia possent; et

sic

quod

facerent quicquid liberet, etiam illicita, et

sic

plus

quam

Deus.

Zab.

de

Schism.

[This

blasphemous sentiment, which Zabarella ascribes

to

the

flatterers, " assentatores," of

the

pope,

has been

sometimes erroneously quoted as

the

cardinal's

own opinion.

-En.]

5

Orbis

princeps.Epiee.

Spal.,

sess. i. p. 24.

e

Regum rex,

et orbis

terrarum

monarcha.

Del

Rio,

sess.

viii.

p.

87.

7

-

virum,

in

quo

erat

potestas supra

omnes potentates,

tam

coeli,

quam

term

Epise.

Patras.,

sess. x. p.

132.