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The Preface

to

thé Reader.

too.keen

Refentments)

of

thefe Hiftorical Accounts

of

them.

(.And

to

leave thefe

things

out was

more than

Mr.

Baxter would allow

me, or admit

of.

Pardon

one

who

a

&s

by

Order, not of Choice.

4.

That

fuch copious and prolix Difcourfes fhould be here

inferted about

Things

fitter for

oblivion,

than

to

be

remembred,

may feem liable

to Exceptions and Diftatt

from

force

;

viz.

fuch Difcourfes

as

refpe&

the

Solemn League and

Covenant, the

Oxford

Aet, etc. Things

'now

abandon'd and repealed by Aet

of

Parliament for Li-

berty of

Confcience. But r: thofe

prefliing A&s

are

yet upon Record,

and

fó, ex-

poled

to the

view

of

Men,

from Age to

Age.

z.

They

reprefent Diffenters

as

an

intolerable

Seed

of

Men.

3.

All Readers will

not

readily

difcem what here

is

laid

by

way

of

Apology

for thofe

of whom

fuch

Ads

rook hold.

4.

Hereby Dif-

femurs will

appear

to

all fucceeding

Generations,

as

a

People worthy

of nothing

but National

Severities

and

Relraints.

Whence s.

their

Enemies will be confirm-

ed

in their

groundlefs

Thoughts and Cenfures

of

them.

6.

This will not

lead

.to

that

Love and

Concord amongil

all

Proteftants which

God's Laws,and the

Pub

-,

lick

Intereff and Welfare

of

Church and

State

require.

7.

Thole

things

abode

fo

long in

force, and

to fach

fatal

dreadful purpofe,

as

that the

Effe

&s

thereof are

felt by

many

Families and

Perforas

to this

day.

8.

And

all this was

but to

dif-

charge

fome,

of no

fmall

Figure

in

their Day

,

from all

Obligations

to

perform

what had

been folemnly vowed

to God.

Surely fuch

as

never took that Covenant

could

only difclaim

all

Obligations

on

themfelves

to keep it, by virtue of any filch

Vow

upon themfelves

:

but

to difcharge

chofe

that had taken

ir,

from what therein

they

had

vowed to God to do

(

till God himfelf difcharge

them, or that

it

be evi-

dent

from

the

intrinfick unalterable Evil

of

the

Matter

vowed,

that no

filch

Vow

(hall

ftand )

is

more

than

I

dare undertake to prove

at

prevent or

to

vindicate

in

the

great Day. However,

a

Man's

own Latitude

of Perfwafion cannot,

as filch;

abfolve

another, nor

eo

naming,

be

another's Rule

or

Law.

But 9.

if

thefe long

Difcourfes be needful,

pertinent,

clear, and

Prong,

as

to the

rate

of that

Affair

their length may be born with.

to. Tho Author thought

it

needful

to

have

Os

let in the clear open

Light, to

difabufe all

that

had been

impaled

on,

by

folle,H

partial

and defeetive

Hiftory

in this

Matter;

and

to remove,

or

prevent, or ááy

Scandal and Cenfure for

time to

come.

i

r. And

if

fach things

be

allo p:rbli

he to

make

our

(elves

and others,

Pill more fenfible

of

what we owe to God, and

trour

molt

gracious

King

(

and

his

late'Soveraign

Contort,

and our then

molt

gr,eious

Queen Mary, not to

be

parallel'd

in

any Hiftory that

I know

of,

br

any

p

her

Sex, for All

truly Royal

Excellencies

)

and

to

his

Parliaments,

who

have

f

much

obliged

us

with freeing

us

from thofe

Co

uncomfortable

Bonds

;

what

Faulcan be

imputed to the Publither herein

?

Shall

Gratitude

be

thought

a

Crime

though

more

copious

in the Materials

of

it, than

may every way

confet with

tie

ltri&er

Bounds

of

Accuracy

?

12.

I

am apt to

think ( and not without cogenrground

)

that

very many Readers

( now and hereafter

)

would ( with the

Aunor)

have

thought

one

unfaithful to themfelvesand him, had

I

not

tranfmitted

o

Polterity

who

he

left, and

as

he

left

it

for their

ufe.

And

I

hope therefore that the Reader

will

not

interpret

this

Publication

as

the

Produ& of

a

Recriminating spirit.

God

himfelf

knows

it

to be

no

fuch

Birth.

Thirdly,

The

Publication.

r.

The

Author wrote

it for this

End.

2.

He

left it with

me to

be

pubiilhed

af-

ter his Death.

3:

He

left

it

to

the Judgment

of

another and m/

felt

only, by

a

Writing ordered to

be

given me after his Death,

as

my Direetory about

the

Publi-

cation

of

his

other Manuleripts, which

are

many, and

of

monent. And

if

the

reif

entrufted with me about

their

being printed

(

one or

two

ca

which he ordered

me to

choofe

ad libitum

,

as

fitly

fuppofing all

might not

be at

leifure)

(hall

think

fit

(of

whole confent I nothing

doubt)

you may expeet a

confiderabla

Volume

of

Letters

byway

of

Epiltolary Intercourfe betwixt him

aad

Mr.

Lawton,

Mr.

Barg

Mr.

Vines,

Mr. Gataker, Mr.

W.

the Lord Chief

Juftice

Hales,

Mr.

Sa.

maul `facomb,

Mr.

Dodwell,

his

dear Flock and Friends at

Kedderminfier,

with

feve-

ral others.

Thefè Letters

are Polemical,

Cafuittical,

and

Praetical.

Some are

Monitory

and

Reproving

:

but

their Names forbidden

to be

mentioned.

Which

Order

thall faithfully

be by me

obferved

; Non enim me

minus obfeguij

gaam i1am

conf:lij

punter.

If

we may find

Encouragement,

I

doubt not

of

the Reader's confi-

derable

Satisfa

&ion and Advantage. But

(to

return to where

I left)

4.

He

had

neither