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The

Preface

to

the Reader.

In

ntte,

Eternal Spirit, Life, Lightand

Love, molt

great and

wife

and

good

,

the Gad

of

Nature,

Grace,

and

Glory :

of

whom,

and

through whom,

and

to

whom are

all

things:

My

abfolute

Owner, Ruler, and

BenefaEtor whofe ,I

am, and

whom

(though

imperfeEtly)

I

ferve,

fek,

and

trial

;

to

whom

be

glory

for

ever, Amen.

To

him

I

render molt

bumble

thanks

that

he

bath

filed

up my

Life

with

abundance

of

Mercy, pardoned my Sint

by

the

Merits ofCbrift, and

vouebfafed

by

bis Spirit

to

Renew

and

Seal

meal

bis

own;

and to

moderate

and

bleed

to

me

my long

Sufferings in the Flefh,

and

at

lait

to

fweeten them

by

bis

own

ïnteref and

comforting Approbation, who

taketh

the Caufe

of

Love

and

Concord as

own.

--

Now let,the Reader

judge

whether any thing

in

all

this can

in the

leaft

infer

his

Doubting or Denial

of

a

Future

State

i

or

any

Repentance

of

the Pains he

took

to

eftablifh others

in the Belief and Hopes

of

what the

Got-pet tells

us

of

as

future.

It

is

ftrange,to

fee

how Men can

trifle in

their

Soul

-

affairs

, and how

eafily

they

can

receive whatever may mortifie

the Life and Joy

of Chrillian

Godlinefs

t

But

we

read

of

fome

that

have been

led

Captive

by

the Devil at

his will.

But this

we may

believe,

and

all (hall find than

the Hell which they gave

no.credit

to the

report

of,

they Bull

furely

feel

and that they

fhall never

reach

that

Heaven

which they would never

believe

Exiffent

,

and

worth their

ferious looking after.

Were

it

but

a

meet

probability, or

poflibility, who will have

the better

of

it

?-

When

we reach

Heaven, we

(hall be

in

"a

Capacity

of

Infulting

over Infidels

:

But

if

there

be

no Future

Stare,

they can never

live

to upbraid

us.

And

it

is

but

folly,

madnefs, and a

voluntary cheating of themfelves, for

Men to think that

Honour,

Parts, or Learning, or Intereft, or

Poffeffions can ever skreen

them from

the Wrath of

a

neglected and provoked God.

And one

would think

that

fuch

a

Spirit

that

can

fo

boldly traduce and afperfe

Men,

is

much below

what

has

acted

a Pagan

Roman; for even

one

of

them,could fay;

Compofstum

jar

fafgue

animi,

Sanitofgue

receffus

Monti.,,

Ctl'

incoltum

genorofa peftua boneflo

Da,

coot,

Pelf.

How little of

this

Spirit

was

in

the

Author and Promoter

of

this Afperfion,

I

leave

to

his

own and others

Thoughts tò

paufe

on

;

whohe

is

I know

not:

But

for

the

fake

of

his

Honour,

Soul,

and Faculty,

I

malt and

will requefi

of

God that he

may,

have

chofe

foirer Remorfes

in

his

own

Spirit in

due

feafon, which may

pre-

vent

a

fmarter Cenfure

from

the univerfal, awful

Judge;

and

that he woud'loberly

paufe

upon what that greatJudge

has

uttered, and left upon record in Mattb.

tu.

36,

37.

for it

is

what

thatJudge will

abide and

try

us

by.

I

can

eafily forefee

that Readers

of

different forts are likely

to

receive this

Work,

with

different Sentiments.

r. The

Interefted Reader, in things related here, will

judgge

of

and relilh

what

he

reads

as

he

finds

himfelf concerned therein

:

He

may polisbly look

upon himfelf

as either

commended or

eápofed,-

blamed or jufiified;

whether

juffly

or

unjuftly he

may

heft

know.

But

I

would hope

that

his Concernednefs for the

Intereft of Equi-

ty

and

Truth,

and

for the Publick

Good,

will rather make him

candid than

lvere.

2.

The

Impartial Reader

is

for

knowing

Truth

in

its

due and

ufeful

Evidence, and

for confidering himfelf

as

liable

toImperfeetions

if

engaged in fuch work

as

this:

and

thus he will allow

for

others Weakneffes,

as

he

would have

his

-own allowed

for.

3.

Shouldany Reader be cenforious, and ftretch Expreffions and Reports beyond

their determin'd Line and Reach, fober and clear

Conviftion

in

this

Cafe may

be

their

Cure.

4.,

As

to the

Judicious Reader, he

loves,

I

know, to

fee

things

in their Nature,

Order, Evidenceand

Ufefulnefs: and

if

he find Materials,

he

can

difpofe

them

ea-

lily, and phrafe

them to

his

own Satisfaftion, and at the

fame time

pity the

injudi-

cioufnefs

of

a

Publilher,

and the imperfeótions

of the

Author.

5

As

to the weak Reader (

for judicioufnefs

is

not

every fober Perfon's

Lot

)

it

will

be harder

to

convince

him beyond

his

ability

of difcerning

things in

their

di-

ftinetnefs,

truth

and

ftrength.

6. As

to the

byaffed

Reader, it

is

hoped

that

his fecond ferious

Thoughts may

cure him

of

his

Partiality.

d

7. As