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P

A

ELT

II.

Reverend

Mr.

Richard

Baxter.

In

the

Communion of

the

Sick,

the ancient

Cufomof

the Church

was,

where

time

and place allowed

it, to

fend the

Deacon

to the Sick, at

the time

of

the

Cele-

bration,

with

a

Portion of

the Confecrated Bread and

Wine, which

is

here

omitted.

The Minifter

is

caufelelly

tied to meet the Corps juft at the

Church Sryle,andto

ufe

the

oft

-

repeated [Lord

have

Mercy

upon

us,Cbri(t have

Mercy upon

us,Lord haveMer-

cy upon

us]

:

And

it

is

a Confufion perilous

to

the living,

that

we are to prefume

that

all we

bury

be

of

one

fort viz.

Elan and Saved: when contrarily

we

fee

multi-

,

tudes die

without

any fuch

Signs

of

Repentance,

as

rational

Charity

can judge

fincere.

It

is

a

diforder that

Women

be

not at

all

required beforehand to

delire any pub-

.

lick

Prayers for their

fate

Deliverance

;

and yet when

they

are delivered,

that

a

Thanklgiving on the Lord's Days,

filch

as is

for

other great

Deliverances

will

not

ferve

the turn, without

a

fpecial Office

;

which

if

performed on the Lord's

Day,

willbe

an

Impediment or Dilturbance to the

publick

Worlhip

:

And while

an

in-

convenientPfalms, and Repetitions, and Refponds

be ufed,

the Prayer

is

defe&ive,

as

will appear by

comparing it

with what we

offer.

It

is a

perilous

Diforder,

that

Penance

(as

it

is

called)

be ufed by

notoriòüsrisners

at

a

fated

time, the

beginning

of

Lent,

which

Ihould

be ufed

(rightly) to

rellore

the Perlon whenever he

is

fallen

:

And

this

is

not

to

be

wified (in

this

Diforder)

to

be

relored

again

;

no more than that Phyfick be given only at

Lent

in acute

Di-

feafes,

which

muff be medicated

out

of

Hand.

In the repeating

of

the

Curfes,

the People

Ihould he

better taught to know

the

difference

of

the Law and Gofpel, and then that excellent dehortation may

be

well ufed

:

But this pertaineth to

the ordinary preaching

of

the Word.

Of

the Refponds, and the doubtful Phrafe [thou

barell nothing

tkat

thou

hag

made]

we

have (poke before.

Other

Otnillions and Diforders appear by comparing

it with what

we

of-

fer.

We

only add upon

the whole,

there further general Remarks.

a.

It

is

a

great Diforder

that

we

have

fo many Prayers,

inftead

of

massy

Petitions

in

one

Prayer

:

The

Gravity and

Serioufnefe

requilee

in

our Prayers to God, and

the Examples

left on

Record in Scripture,

do perfuade

us,

when

we have

many

Petitions

at

once to

put

up to

God, which

all

have a

Connexion in Nature

anj

Neceifty,

that there

Ihould be filch

a

Connexion

of

our

Deli;

es

and Requefs, an

many of them

Ihould

confiture

one

Prayer,

whereas the

Common Prayer

-Book,

in

its

numerous

Collets,

doth make

oft times

as

many Prayers

as

Petitions

;

and

we

un-

decently begin

with

a folemn

Preface, and

as

Solemnly conclude, and

then begin

again

; as

if

before

every

Petition

of

the

Lord's Prayer,

we

should

repeat

[Our

Fa-

ther which

art

in

Heaven]

and

after

every

Petition

[

For thine

is

the Kingdom, the

Parer

and

the

Glory].

Yet

we deny

not that when

we have

but

Tome

one

Parti-

cular Requeft to

put

up, without Connexion with others, we may

then

make a

Prayer

of

that

alone.

a.

Hence

it

comes

to

pafs

that the

holy and reverend Name of God

is

made

the

matter

of

unneceffary

Tautologies,

while half

the Prayer

is

made up of

his

Attri-

butes

and

Addreffes

to him, and with Conclufions containing the Mention

of

his

Name

and

Kingdom,

and the Merits of

his

Son

;

even in holy

Worlhip

we

Ihould

fear

Ming

God's Name unreverently and in vain.

g.

And it

is

a

great Diforder,

that

fo

much

of

the

publick Prayers

Ihould be

uttered

by

the People,

as

in the

Refunds, and

that they only Ihould put up

the

petitioning

part,

while the

Minifer

doth but

faggef

to

them, or

recite the Mat-

ter of the Petitions,

as

in the Litany

:

feeing the

Minifer

is

by Office to

be

the

Mouth

of

the

People and God, and Scripture intimateth, that ordinarily their

Part

was but

to fay,

[Amen% ;

and

it

feemeth to many fober People,

who are much

of-

fended at

it,

to

be a

very confided and unfeemly

Murmur, that

is

caufed in

moil

Congregations

by

the Peoples

(peaking. Efpecially when in reading

the

Pfalms

the People

fay

every fecond Verle, which cannot

he

heard and underflood

by filch

as

cannot read, or

have

no

Books

;

and,

then the other Verle which the

Minifer

S

s

á

faith,

315.