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316

2be

I. I

F

E

of

the

LIB.

faith,

is

not underltood,

becaufe we hear

not the annexed

Verfe,

which

containeth

part

of

the

Senfe.

And

fo

the whole

reading Pfalms, are almoft

as

in

Latin

to

them that cannot read

themfelves.

And

that

all

this

is

really

Diforder

and

contrary

to Edification, appeareth

both in

the

Reafon

of

the thing,

and in

that

the Prayers mentioned

in

Scripture

are

of

ano-

ther Order

;

and

in that they are

not according to the Method

of

the

Lord's

Prayer, which

is

the perfect Rule

of

Prayer in

all univerfal

Prayers, which

confills

not

of

occafional

Particulars;

and in

that

the

mot

fenfible

experienced

praying

Chrifians

find

it by

Experience to hinder their Edification (and their

Teltimony

lltbuld

be

preferred before

that

of

ignorant,unexperienced,

partial, orungodly Men;

or

at

leaf

a

Courfe

taken

which

is

agreeable to both

forts,

and hindereth the

Edifi-

cation

of neither):

And lathy thofe very Men

that

will

not

reform any of

this

Diforder in the Liturgy, do naufeate and condemn the

Prayers

of

a weak Miriller,

or private

Chritian, if

they

have

but the fourth part

of

the

very like Diforders,

Repetitions, Tautologies, or

Defeels

as

the Liturgy bath.

For thefe

Reafons a

proportionable Reformation

is

defired.

Betides

all

forementioned, there

is

in two months

fpace

no

lets

than

one

hundred

and nine Chapters

of

the Apocrypha appointed

to

be

read

as

Leffons,

jut

in

the

time, manner, and Title

as

the Chapter of the holy

Scriptures

be; even dte

Stories

of

Tobit,

andyndithbeing

part;

and

alfoof

Bel

and

the

Dragon,

and

Snfanna, which

Protetants

hold to

be

but

Fables. But thole

Exceptions which we a&ually

offered

to the

Bifliops were as follows.

The Exception!

againfi

the Book

of

Common

-

Prayer.

A Cknowledging with

all

humility and thankfulnefs,

his

Majety's

mot

Princely

£]

Condefèention and Indulgence, to

very

many of

his

Loyal Subjetts,

as

well

in

his

Majety's

mot

gracious

Declaration,

as

particularly in this prefent

Commit:

lion,

iffued

forth in purfuance

thereof;

we doubt not but the right Reverend

Bi.

!hops

; and

all

she

ret

of

his

Majety's

Commilftoners intrufted in

this

Work,

will,

in

imitation of

his

Majefty's

mot

prudent and Chrillian Moderation and

Clernen.

cy,

judge it

their Duty

(what

we

find

to

be

the Apotles own

Pratice)

in

a fped

.

al

manner to

be

tender

of

the Churches Peace, to

bear with the Infirmities

of

the

weak, and

not to

pleafe themfelves,

nor

to meafure the Confciences

of

other

Men

the

Light

and Latitude

of

their own,

but ferioufly and readily to confider

and

advife

of

filch

Expedients,

as

may

mot

conduce to the healing

of

our

Breaches,

and

uniting

thole

that

differ.

And albeit

we have an high

and honourable

eteem of

thofe godly and learned

Ili'fhops,

and

others, who were the

firft

Compilers

of

the publick

Liturgy,

and

do

look upoh

it

as

an

excellent and

worthy Work,

for that

time, when the Church

of

England

made her

fiat cep

out

of

inch a

Mill of

Popilla

Ignorance and Supertition

wherein it formerly

was

involved; Yet confidering that

all

human Works do

gra

dually arrive at their Maturity and

Perfeetion;

and this in

particular

being

a

Work of that Nature, bath

already admitted feveral Emendations

finen

the fiat

compiling thereof.

It

cannot

be

thought

any Difparagement

or Derogationeither to the Work

it

felf,

or to the Compilers

of it,

or to

thofe who have

hitherto

ufed

it,

if

after

more

than

an

hundred

Years,

fnce

its

fiat

compofure, fuch further Emendations

be

now

made

therein,

as

may be judged necelfary for fatisfying the Scruples

of

a

multitude of

fober Perlons,

who cannot

at

all

(or

very

hardly)

comply with the

rife

of

it,

as

now it

is,

and may bell fate with the

prefent times after

fo

long an Enjoyment

of

the

glorious

light

of

the Gofpel, and

fo

happy

a

Reformation. Efpecially

confi-

daring that many Godly and

learned

Men,

have floor the beginning all along

ear

-

nehly

defired

the Alteration

of

many things therein, and very many of

his Maje-

fly's

pious, peaceable, and loyal

Subje&s,

after fo long a difcontinuance

of

it,

are

more

averle from

it than

heretofore.

The

fatisfying

of

whom

(as

far

as

may

be)

will very much conduce to

that

Peace and

Unity

which

is

fo

much

defired

by

all

good Men, and

fo

much endeavoured

by his

mot

excellent

Majety.

And