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336

The

LIFE

of

the

__

E

á. I.

ration and Commifïìon, r.

That

the ends expreffed are

[fort&

removal

of

all Ex-

ceptions

and

Dail/ions

of

Exceptions,

and

Differences 1;W/310402g

ourgood

Subjels,

]

and

[

forgiving

Satisfaflion

to

tinder

Confciences,

and

the refloring

and

continuance

of

Peace

and

Unity in

the

Churches.]

2.

And

the

means

is

[

to

make fuch

reafonable

and

necef-

fary Alteration,

CorreElions,

and

Amendments therein,

as fball

be agreed

upon

to

be need-

ful

and

expedient,

fir

the

giving

SatisfaElion

to

tendonConfciences,

and

goring

and

con-

timing

Peace,

&c.] We

plainly

fhewed hence

that the King

fuppofeth

that

fomc

Alterations

muff

be

made

:

But

the

Bilho

s

in

&Bed

on two

Words

[nerefáry]

Aire.

rations, and [fuch

as fhould

be

agreed

ea]

We anfwered them,

That

the Word

[neceffary]

hath reference

to the Ends

exprel%d,

viz. [the

fatisfying

tender

Confcien.

eel

]

and

is

joined

with

[Expedient]: And

its

['range

if

when

the

King

bath

fo

long and publickly determined

of

the

End, and called

us

to

confult

of

the

means,

we

fhould prefume

now at

left

to coneradiet him, and

to

determine

that

the

End

is

felf

is

unneceffary, and confequently

no

means

neceffary

thereto

:

What then

have

we

all this

while been doing

?

2. And when theyare

called

to

[agree]

on

tech

neceffary means,

if

they will take the Advanta a

of that

Word, to

[agree

on

,

thing] that

fo

all Endeavours may be fruftrated

for

no

want

of

their Agreement,

God

and the World would

judge

between

us,

who it

is

that

fruftrateth the King's

Coin-

niiffion, and the Hopes

ofa

divided bleeding

Church.

Thus

we

continued

a

long

time contending

about

this

Point,

[Whether

fame

Alterations

be

fuppofed

by

the Xing'i

Declaration

and

Commiflion

to

be

made

by no

?

or whether

we were

anewto

difpute that

Point

t

But

the

Bifltops

would have

that to

be

our

Task or

none; to

prove

by

Difputation that

any

Alteration was

nece/Jary

to

be

made; while

they

confuted

our

Proofs. We

told them, that the

End

being

[to

fatisfy render

Cenfciences

and

procure

Unity,] thofe

tender

Confciences did themlelves

profef(s,

that without

fome Altera-

tion, and that

confiderable

too, they

could

not

be

tatisfied; and Experience told

them, that

Peace

and

Unity

could

not without

it

be attained. But Bill

they

fold,

that

none

was

necefjary,

and they

would

yield to all

that we

proved

ñeceffary.

And

here we wereleft in

a

very great Strait

:

If

we lltould

enter uponDifpute

withthem,

we gave up

the End

and Hope

of our endeavours:

If

we

refuted

it,

we knew

that

they

would boaít

that when it

came to the fetting to, we would

not

fo much

as

attempt to

prove any thing unlawful in the

Liturgy, nor

dunk difpute

it

with

them.

Mr.

Calamy

with

Tome

others

of

our Brethren

would have

had

usrefufe

the

Motion of

difputing,

as

not

tending to

fulfil

the

King's Commands

:

We

told the

Bithops

over and over,

that they could not

choofe

but know that before we

could

end one Argument in

a

Difpute, our time would be expired

;

and that

it

could

not

polfibly

tend to any Accommodation:

And

that to

keep

off

from perfonal

Conference, till

within a few

Days

of

the Expiration of the Commiífion,

and

then

torefolve to do nothing but wrangle out the time in a Difpute,

as

if

we were

between

jeaft and

earneft

in the

Schools, was

too

vifibly

in

the fight

of

all the

World,

to

defeat the King's Commilliion, and the Expedtations

of

many

Thou.

lands, who longed for

our

Unity

and

Peace.

But we fpoke

to

the

Deaf;

they

had

other

Ends, and were other

Men, and

had

the Art to

fuit

the

means unto

their

Ends.

For my part, when

we few

that

they would do nothing

elfe,

I

per-

loaded

our Brethren to yield to a Difputation with

them,

and

let

themunderfand

that

we were

far from fearing

it,

feeing

they

would give

us

no

hopes

of Concord:

but withal,

firft

to

profeti

to them, that the Guilt

of

difappointing

his Majefty and

the

Kingdom,

lay

not upon

us,

who

defined

to

obey

the King's Commiflion, but

on them. And

fo

we yielded

to

fpend

the little time remaining, in difputing

with

.

them, rather

than

go home

and

do nothing,

and

leave

them

to

tell

the

Court that

we durit not difpute

with them when

they

fo

provoked

us,

nor

wereable to

prove

our

Accufations

of

the

Liturgy.

§19;.

When

this was refolved

on,

we fpent many Hours

with them

about

the

Order

of

our

Difpuration:

I

offered

them to

fpend

one

half of

the time in the

Opponents part,

if

they would promife

to

do

the

like the

other half

of the

time,

when we

had

done, that our Difputation might be

on

equal Terms.

They

relu-

fed

this, and anfwered,

That it

belonged to

us

only to

argue

who

were the

Accu-

fers,

and not at

all

to

them

who were on

the Defence. I

told

them

it

was

we

that

are the Defendants

againf.their

Impofitions

:

They

command

us

to

do

fuch and

fuch things,

'or

elfe

wefhallbeexcommunicate,

filenced, imprifoned, and undone;

We

defend our

felves

againf

this cruelty, by calling upon them to thew their,Au-

thority

from

Godfor

fuch

tmpofirions: Therefore

we

Bill call

upon them

to

prove

that

God path

authorifed them

to any fuchthing

:

And

if

they refute

this,

they do

give up

their

Cauf.

We

offered firft

to'

prove

the

unlawfulnejc

of their

Impofitiooss

if