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338

TheLIFE

of

the

LIB.7

hibition. At

loft

I

let him

talk,

and

fpake

to

thole nearer me, which would

hear

me,

and told them,

that

this was it

that

I

was

going to fay,

'I

hat

I

granted

Bifhop

Zany,

that

it

was poflible

to

be free

from

ao

ing Sin for a

certain

time that

fo he

might

have

no matter of

Objeâion

againft me

; and

that

the

Inftances

of

my

Conceffion were thefe:

s.

In

the time

of

abfolute

Infancy.

a.

In the

time

of

to-

tal

Fatuity or Madnefs,

as

natural

Ideots that never had the

ufe

of

Reafon.

3.

In

the

cime

of

a

Lethargy,

Carus, or Apoplexy,

or

Epileplie.

4.

In the

time

of

lawful fleep,

when

a

Man

Both

not

fo

much

as

dream

amifs

:

And whether

any

other

Inftances might

be

given,

I determined not.

But

as

I

talked

thus;

Bifhop

Manly

went on, talking

louder

than I,

and would

neither hear

me, nor

willingly

have had

me

to

have been heard. Behind me at

the lower

end

of

the

Table,

flood Dr.

Crowther,

and he would confute

me, and

I

defended Dr.

Lang,

in

that'

`yeroboam

made

Vac!

to

Sin

:

What gather you thence, quoth

I,

that

they

bad

no

Sin

but

that,

or

never finned

before

:

He

anfwered yes; and

with

a

little

Nonfence

would defend

it,

that

Ifrael

finned

not

till

then

:

When I

had proved

the

contrary

to

him

in

the

general Acceptation

of

the Word

[Sin

;11

I

told

him, that if

betook

the Word Figuratively, the

Genus

for

a

Species,

1

granted him

that

they

finned

not

that

Species

of

Sin,

which

feroboass

taught

them, which

is

in the

Text

emphati-

cally called Sin

:

If

he meant

that they

finned

no

Sin

of

Idolar

y,

or no

NarianalSin

till then,

It

was

not

true, and

if

it were,

it

was

nothing to our Queftion,

which

was

about

Sin

in the General, or indefinitely.

He

told me they Sinned

no

Na-

tional

Sin till

then.

I

asked

hint whether the Idolatry,

tile

Unbelief, the

Mur-

muring,

&o. by which

all

the

Nation,

fave

Caleb

and

yofhna

fell

in

the

Wildernefs,

and the Idolatry

for

which

in the time of the Judges

the Nation

was

conquered,

and captivated, were none of them National

Sins?

I

give

the Reader the lnftance

of

this Odious kind

of

Talk, to

thew him what kind

of Men

we talkt

with,

and

what

a

kind

of Task

we had.

§

196.

And

a

little further touch

of it

I

(hall

give you

:

When I

heg'd

their

Compaffion

on the

Souls

of

their Brethren,

and

that

they would

not

unneceffari-

ly call

fo

many out

of

the Miniflry and their Communion

:

Bifhop

Cafina

told

me

that we threamed them

with Numbers, and for

his

part,

he

thought

the

King

fhould

do well to make

us

name them

all.

A charitable and

wife

Motion

!

To

name

all

theThoufands

of

England

that

diffented from them, and that had

fworn

the Covenant, and whom they would after

Perlècute.

1

197.

When I

read in the Preface to our Exceptions againft the Liturgy

[That

after

twenty years Calamity,

they

would

not

yield

to

that

which fevered

Bifhops

volunta-

rily

offered

twenty

Tears before]

(meaning the Corrections of the Liturgy

offered by

Archbifhop

Ufber,

Archbilhop

Walliama.

Bifhop Marton,

Dr.

Prideaux;

and

many

others);

Bifhop

Coffin

anfwered me,

That

we threatned them with

a

new War,

.

and it

was

time for the King to

look

to

us

:

I

had no lhelter from the Fury

of

the

Bifhop but

to

name Dr.

Hammond,

and tell

him

that

I

remembred Dr.

Hammond

inlfted

on the

fame

Argument,

that

twenty

Tears

Calamity fhould have taught

Men

more

Charity, and

brought them

to

repentance

and

Brotherly

Love; and that it

is

an

Ag-

gravation

of

their

Sin

to

be

unmerciful

after fo

long and heavy Warningsfrom

God's

Hand

:

He

told

me,

if

that

were our meaning, it

was

all well. And thefe

were

the molt logical Difcourfes

of that

Bilhop.

§

198.

Among

all

the

hilltops there

was

none who had

fo

ptomifrng

a

Face

as

Dr.

Sterne

the Bilhop

of

Carlifle

t

Ile

look'd

fo

honeftly,

and gravely, and

foberly,

that

I

fcarce thought

fuch

a

Face could have deceived

me;

and when I

was in-

treating them not to call out

fo

many

of

their Brethren through the

Nation,

as

ferupeled a

Ceremony which

they confefs'd indifferent, he

turn'd to the

veil

of

the

Reverend

Billiops,

and

noted

me

for

laying [in

the

Nation:]

He

will

not fay

[in

the

Kingdom]

faith he,

left

he

awn

a King;.

This

was

all

that

ever

I

heard thatworthy

Prelate

fay

:

But with

grief

I

told him, that

half

the

Charity which

became

fo

grave

a

Bithop, might have

fisfficed

to have helps him

to

a

better Expofitionof

the

Word [Nation]

;

from the

Mouths

of

firth who

have

fo

lately taken the

Oaths

of

Allegiance

and Supremacy, and fworn Fidelity to the King

as

his

Chaplains,

and had

filch

Teftimonres front him

as

we

have had

:

and

that our

cafe was fad,

if

we

could plead by the

Kings

Commillion

for Accommodation, upon no no better

Terms, than to

be noted

as

Traytors,

every

time we

ufed Inch a

Word

as

the [Na-

tion];

which

all

monarchical

Writers

ufè.

4

r99