Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  391 / 846 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 391 / 846 Next Page
Page Background

P

A

i

T

II.

Reverend

Mr.

Richard

Baxter.

I

appealed

to the

Auditors

of

his

Party

;

.

and they gave no Anfwer

:

Dr.

Bat.

witneffed

it, Dr.

yacomb offered his

Oath

of

it. He

told them that they were

Parties.

By this

time'

faw

mine

Error,

in giving way for

their

Doelors

to crowd

in

to applaud

them and

witnefs for

them,

when we had none

(or next

to

none)

of

ours

there, fuppofing

by

the Agreement

three only muff have Rayed.

§

227.

When

Dr.

Gunning

had read

his

infulting Anfwer the

day

before, and

made

a

great matter

of

my telling

the Refpondent

of

[begging

the

Q

eftion]

:hey

put Dr. Sanderf

n, Bifhop

of

Lincoln,

into the

Chair,that

his

Learning

and

Gravity

might

put

a

Reputation

upon

his

Sentence

(he

being

a very

worthy Man, but for

that

great Pievilhnefs,

which

Injuries, Partiality,_

Temperature

and

Age had

cau-

fed

in

him)

:

The

Bifhop

in

a few

angry Words pronounced thát Dr.

Gunni

g

had

the better, and that the Refpondent

could

nor

beg the

Queftion,

and

that I

was

a

Man of Contention

if

I

offered

to Reply.)

I toldhim, that thoughwe

reveren-

ced much

his

Lordfhip's Age and

Learning, yet he

was

but

a

Party,

and

no Judge

:

which yet if he

were,

it

was fo

ftrange to

us

that

a

Man

lhould be

prohibited to

reply, and

a Cenfure

antidated paired on that Reply before

it

was

heard, and on

the Replyers

for

it, that

we craved his Lordlñip's

Pardon if

we difobeyed

him,' and

gave

in

our

Reply,

which

might

have

more in

it

than

he could forefee.

And the

next Day when I

gave in

the Reply

(before infected)

there

was

no

fuch Infulting

as before.

§

228. When Dr.

Gunning

had

read his

Citations

of

Teftimonies

of

the

Senfe

of

Rom.

14,

and

Is.

Bifhop

Coffin,

called

to

all

the

Bithops

and

Doors

in

the Room

for

their

Votes, [All

you

that think that

Dr.Guning

bat,

proved

that

Rom.14.

fpeaketb,

not

of

receiving

to the

Sacrament,

fay,

I.] And

fo

they

all

eryed, I. I told him that

we

knew their

Opinion before;

and

if

this

were the

life

that he made

of

our Con

-

ceflión,

that they

Mould

be

all

prefent while

ours

were

all

abfent

(fave

two

or three

Scholars, and

two

or

three Gentlemen

thatftood

behind

to

hear)

it (hewed

that

their

Caufe was very needy

of

Defence, when their own Voices muff go

in-

Bead

of

Argument

:

But

if

they would

go on

upon

fuch lamentable Reafoning

as

they had ufed, to call out the faithful Pallors and

the

People, and divide the

Church,

and

[email protected]&

their Brethren, the Day

was

coming when

their

own

Votes

lhould

not

abfolve

them.

§

229. Hereupon we

fell again

upon the point

of

Charity

and

Compafonito

the

Church,

and

their fruftrating the King's

Cemmilïon,

and the

Kingdoms Hopes.

And when they

profeffed

their

Delires

of

the Churches Peace,

I

told them they

would not abate the

fmalleft

Thing,

nor corre& their groffeftErrors

for

it

:

And

hereupon I

read over

to

them the Preface

(drawn

up by Mr.

Calamy) before

our

Reply to their Anfwer to our Exceptions againft the

Liturgy, which reciting their

Corruptions,

and Ihewed

their Unpeaceablenefs, offended but

filenced them.

I z

;o.

By

this time the Evening

of

bur Laft Day

was

far

gone;

and

I

defired

to

know.

of

them, whether

we lhould continue our Difpute any further,

as

Private

Men

Voluntarily among our

(elves

;

for

I had many more

Arguments,

which I

defired before

to have read

all

at

once,

but could

not

be

permitted

:

Or

whether

they would

receive my Arguments, and

the

Reply

which

I

lalt

read. Dr.

Pierfon

refolved

that he would meddle no more after

that Night.

Bifhop

Morley

faid,

he

thought

it unfit

when the King'sCommilfion

was

expired that we

lhould

meddle

in

it

any farther. But

Dr.

Gunning

and

I

had fo

much mind to it, (for I knew

that

almoll

all

my Argumentswere

yet behind,

and

it

was a

Caufe

that might eafly be

made very plain) that

I told him,

I

would venture

on the Danger for the

Love

of

Charity

and Peace, and

he agreed that

I

lhould fend him

in

all my Arguments,

with the

laft

Reply

,(which

he had

not

anfwered) the next Day.

§

z;

I. Laftly,

I

defired Bifhop

Morley

to

refolve

us

what Account we were jointly

to

give

his Majefty

of

our Proceedings,

that

we might

not wrong each other

:

And

by his and

their Content it

was

agreed

on, that

we give

nothing

in

oar Ac-

count

to the

King

as

charged on one

another,

but

what

is

delivered in by the

party

in Writing

:

And

that

all

our

account was to

be

this,

That

we were

all

agreed

on

the

End,

for the ChurchesWelfare,

Unity,

and Peace, and

his

Majefty's Happi-

nefs

and

Contentment, but

after

all

our

Debates,

were difagreed

of

the means.

And this was

the End

of that

Affembly and Commiffion.

§

a;z.As

foon

as

we were

gone,'

delivered my Papers

to

aScribe to be tranfcrib'd

And about Eight

a

Clock

or

Nine,

juff

as

Iwas entring the Door

of

my

Lodging,

Dr.

Gunni

g's

Meffenger comes

to me, to

tell me,

that uponfurther Confderation,

hefhould

receive

no

more Papers from me after that Day, and

fo

our

farther trou-

ble

was

prevented.

4233.

3

5'7