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P

A

K.

r

II.

Reverend

Mr. Richard

Baxter.

To

maintain and exercife this

Principle; That

[

Things

as.

unneceffary,

(mall

and doubtful,

as

kneeling in

the Reception

of

the

Sacrament

of

the Lord's Supper;

are

tobe made

neceffary

to the Communion

of

the Church]

is

to maintain

and

ex

ercife a

Principle

of Church

Divilion.

But to enjoyn all

Minilters to deny Communion to

all

that dare

not

Receive

kneeling,

is

to

ní'aintain and exercife

this Principle, that

[

Things

as

unneceffary;

(mall and doubtful,

as

kneeling in

the Reception

of the

Sacrament

of

the Lord's

Supper,

are

to be made neceffary

to the Communion

of

the

Church,].

Ergo,

To

enjoyn

all,

be.

is

to maintain and exercife

a

Principle

of Church-

Divilion.

The

Major.

(which

only

needs

proof)

is

thus proved.

To

maintain and exercife

filch

a

Principle

as,

x.

Never

yet

was

exercifed, but it,

did divide the Church ; 2.and by which

its

Divifions have been caufed

or

cherilhed

ever

fence

the

Roman Ufurpation begun

;

;.and

which cannot

poíïìbly

conll

with

Unity

whilfì'

Chrilliansareof

fuch different

I.

Educations, 2. and degrees

of

Na-

tural Underftanding,

;:

and

degrees

of

Grace,

is

to maintain and exercife

a

Prin-

ciple

of

Church

Divilion.

But

to

maintain and exercife this Principle

[That

Things

as

unneceffary,

fm all

and

doubtful

as

kneeling in the Reception

of the

Sacrament, are to

be

made ne-

ceffary

to the Communionof the Church]

is

to maintainand exercife

fuels

a

Prin-

ciple,

as

r.

never yet

wasexercifed

but

it

did divide,

&c.-

-Ergo-

And thus our Difpute at

the

Savoy

ended,

and with

it

ourEndeavours for Recon-

ciliation upon the

Warrant of the King's Commililon.

4

2

;6.

Were

it

not

a

thing in which an

Hiftorian

fo

much concerned in

the

bufinefs

is

apt to

be

fufpeâed

of

partiality, I would here annex

a

Charadter

of

each

one

that

managed this

bufinefs

as

they

(hewed themfelves. But becaufe

it

hash

that

inconvenience,

I

will

omit

ir, only

tellingyou what

part

each one

of

them aeied

in

all this

Work.

The

Bifhop

of

London

(fence Archbifhop ofCanterbnry) only appeared

the

firft'

day

of

each

Conference

(which ,

betides

that

before

the King,'

was

but twice

in

all as

I

remember) and medled not at

all

in any Difputations

:

But

all

Men fuppo-

fed

that

he and Bifhop

Morley

(and next

Bithop

Hincbman)

were

the

doers

and di-

fpofers

of

all

fach

Affairs.

The

Archbilhop

of

Tork'

fpake

no more than

I

have*

prewe&

told you, and came

but

once or twice in all. Bithop

Morley

was

oft there, but

not

conRantly, and

with

free and fluent words,

with much

earneftnefs, was

the chief

Speaker

of

all

the

Bithops,

and the greateft Interrupter

of

us

;

vehemently going

on with what he thought

ferviceable

to

his

end

and bearing

down

Anfwers by the.

faid fervour and interruptions. Bithop

Cofrnr

was there

conRantly, and had

a

great

deal

of

talk with

fo

littleLogick, Natural

or

Artificial, that

I

perceived

no one

much

moved by any thing he

laid. But

two

Verrues he Ihewed

(thoughnone took

him for

a

Magician)

:

One

was,

that he

was

excellently

well

veiled in

Canon,,,

Coancilr,

and

Fardera,

which

he remembred, when by

citing

of

any

Paffages

we.

tried

him.

The

other

was,

that

as

he

was

of

a

Ruftick Wit

and

Carriage,

fo

he

would

endure more freedom

of

our

Difcourfe

with him, and

was

more

affable

and

familiar than the

reif.

,

Bifhop

Hincbman

(fine

Bilhop

of

London) was

of

the molt

.

grave,-comely, reverend

Afpeâ,of

any

of

them ; and

of

a

good

infight

in

the.

Farhers,and Councils,

Cofin,

and he and Dr.

Gunning

being

all

that

(hewed any

of

that

skill

among

us

confiderable: in which they are

all

three

of

very laudable

un-

derftandings, and better than any other

of

either

of

the Parties that I met

with

:

And

Bifhop

Incbman

fpake calmly and (lowly,

and not

very oft

:

But

was

as

high

in

his

Principles and Refolutions

as

any

of

them.

Bithop

Sanderfoá

of

Lincoln

was fome

time

there, but

never

fpake

that

I

know

of

butwhat I havetold you

before

:

But

his

great

Learning

and

Worthare known by

his

Labours',

and

his aged

Peevilbneß not unknown,

M

Since,

at

his

death,

he

made

it

his

respell

that

theoo

late.

d

niaers mightbe

ufed

again:

but

his

regüea

was

¡tidied

by

them

that

had overwit-

ted

bun;

as

being

too

Bifhop

Gauden

was

our molt conffant helper

;

He

and BifhopCofna feldom

were

abfent. And how,

bitter

foever his

Pen

be, he was

the

only

Moderator

of

all

the Ili.

limps

(except our Bifhop

Reignedeb

)

He

Ihewed no Logick

;

nor

medled

in any

Difpute,

or

Point of Learning;

but a calm, fluent, Rhetorical Tongue

:

And

if

A

a

a

a

all