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364.

The

L

IFE

of

the

L

I

B

Ï

all had been

of

his

mind, wehad been

reconciled

:

But

when

by many days

Con.

ference in the beginning, we had got

Come

moderating

Concefiions from him (and

from Bishop

Coftns

by

his

means) the reif came in

the

end

and

brake them

all

Bithop

Lucie

of

St.

David's, fpakeonce

or twice

a

few

words calmly, and

fo

did

'

Bithop

N:cbeffon

of

Glocefler,

and

Bishop

Griffiths

pf

elfapb

(thoughno

CommiíCion-

ers)

;

and didno more.

Bifbop.King

of

Chicheffer

I

never

raw.

there

: Bilhop

Warner

of

Rocbefler

was

there

once or twice, but

medled

not that

I

heard. Bilhop

Lany,

of

Peterborough

was twice

or thrice

there, and

talked

as

is

before

recited

; for

I

remember no

more.

Bihop

Walton

of

Cbefter

was

there once ortwice, and

fpalie

but what-

is before

recited,that I know

of.

Bishop

Sterne

of

Carl,

time

Archbilhop

of

Tark, was

of

a

molt

fober,

honett,

mortified Afpeet, but

Make

nothing that

I

know

of

,

but

that

weak uncharitable

word before mentioned

:

fo

that

I

was

never more deceived

by

a

Man's Face.

Bishop Reignoldffpake

much the

first

day

for bringing them to

Abatements

and

Moderation

:

And afterwards he

fate

with them,

and fpake

now

and then

a word

sfor Moderation.

He

was afolid honest

Man , but through

mildness

and

excefs

of

timerous reverence

to

great

Men, altogether

unfit

to contend with

them.

Mr.

Tborndike

fpake once

a few

impertinent

paffionate words, confuting the O-

pinion whichwe

had received

of

him from

hisfirft

Writings, andconfirming that

which

his fecond and laft Writings

had

given

us

of

him.

Dr.

Earle,

Dr.

Heylin,

and Dr.

Barwick

never came. Dr.

Hacker

(rime

Bishop

of

Coventry

and

Litchfield

)

faid

nothing

to make

us

know any thing

of

him. Dr.

Sparrow

Paid

but

little;

but that

little

was

with

a

Spirit enough for

the

impofing

dividing Cause.

.

Dr.

Pierfan

and Dr.

Gunning

did all their Work (betide

Bifhop

Merley's

Difcour-

fes)

but with greet

difference in

the manner. Dr.

Pierfan

was

their true Logician

and Difputant, without whom,

as

far

as

I

could difcern, we

should have

had

no-

thing from them,but Dr.

Gunning's

paffionate Inve

&ives

mitt

with

fome

Argumen-

rations:

He

difputed acurately, foberly and

calmly

(

being but once

in

anypatfi-

on)breeding in

us

a

great

refpeet for

him,and

a perfwafion

that if he had been inde-

pendent, he

would have been for Peace, and

that if

all

were in

his

power

,

it

would have gone

well

:

He

was

the ftrength and honour

of that

Caufe

which

we

doubted whether he heartily maintained.

Dr.

Gunning

Was

their forwardeft and

greatest Speaker

;

underltanding

well

what

belonged

to a

Difputant;

a

Man

of

greater Study and Induffry

than

any

of

them,

well read

in

Fathers and

Councils

;

and

of

a ready Tongue

;

(and

I

hear

and

believe

of

a

very temperate Life,

as

to

all

Carnal

Exceffes whatfoever

)

:

but

fo vehement for his high impofing Principles, and fo overzealous for Arminia-

nifm

and Formality and Church

Pomp,

and

fo

very eager and fervent in his

Difcourfe,

that I

conceive his Prejudice and Paflìon much perverted

his

judg-

ment, and I

am

fare they made him lamentably

over

run

himfelf

in

his

Dif.

courfes.

Of

Dr.

Pierce

I will

fay nomore, becaufe he hath

faid fo

much

of

me.

On

our part, Dr.

Barer

fpake

very

folidly,

judicioulfy and

pertinently when he

fpake

:

And for my

felf,

the

reason why

I

fpake fo

much,

was becaufe

it

was

the

desire

of my

Brethren, and I

was

loth to

expofe

them

to the

hatred

of

the

Bishops

but

was

willinger to take

it

all

upon my

felf,they themfelves having fo much wit

as

to

be

therein

more fparing and cautelous than

I;

and

I

thought that the

Day

and

Cause

commanded

me

thole

two things,

which then were

obje&ed against me

as

my Crimes,

viz.

/peaking

too boldly,

and

too long.

And I thought it a

Caufe that

I

could comfortably fufter for

;

and fhould

as

willingly

be a

Martyr

for

Charity

as

for

Faith.

§

237. When

this

Work

was

over,

the

refi

of

our Brethren met again,

and

re-

folved

to

draw

up an Account

of

our Endeavours, and prefent it

to

his Majefly,

5Refmd

with our Petition

for his promifed

help

yet for

thole Alterations and Abatements

to

tonre_

which we couldnot procure of the

Bithops

:

And

that

firft

we

Ihould acquaint the

thing that

Lord Chancellour

withal, and

confult

with

him about

it

Which we

did

;

and

as

Pall

be-

loon

as

we

came to him, according

to

my expe

&ation,

I

found

him

moll

offend-

s

seen

str.

ed

at

me,

and

that

I

had taken

off

the diflafte and blame from

all

the

refl.

At

me,and

[That

if

I

were but as

fat

as

Dr.

Manton

,

we

about

our

firft

entrancehe mealy

told

us,

f

f

my lean-

should

all

do

well

].

I

told him,

if

his

Lordfhip

could teach me

the

Are

of

growing

ndshr.

far,

he should find

me

not unwilling to learn,by

any good

means.

He grew

more

serious,