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P

A

ß

T

II.

Reverend

Mr,

Richard

Baxter.

365

ferious,

and

Paid,

That

I

was

fevere and

ftriet,

like

a

Melancholy

Man,

and made

thofe things

Sin

which

others did

not

:

And I perceivedhe hart been

poffeffed

with

difpleafure

towards me upon that account,

that

I

charged the Church and Liturgy

with Sin;

and

had

not

fuppofed

that the worn

was

but

inexpedient,}.

I told him

that

I

had fpoken

nothing but what

I

thought, and

had given my Reafons

for-

-

After

other

fuch Difcourfe,

we craved

his

Favour to procure the Ding's Declarati-

on yet to

be

paf

into an

Aft,

and

his

Advice what we had further to do.

He

contented that we

fhould

draw up

an Addrefs

to

his

Majefty; rendering him an

account

of

all ; but defired

that

wewould

firft

%hew

it

him

:

which

we promi-

fed.

238.

When we Ihewed our Paper to the Lord Chancellour

(

which

the

Bre-

thren

had defired

me

to draw up, and had contented

to

without any alteration)

he

was

not

pleated

with

Tome

Paffages

isY

it,

which he thought too .pungent

or

pref-

ftng

:

but

would

not

bid

us

put

them out. So we went with

it to the Lord Chàm-

berlain(who had

heard from the

Lord

Chancellor about

i9,and

I

read it

to

him

al

-'

fo, and he

was

carnet

with

us

to

blot

out

fome Paffages

as

too

vehement, and

filch

as would

not

well be born.

f

was very

loth to

leave

them.out,

but

Sir

Gilbert

Ger-

rard (an

ancient godly Man) being with him, and

of

the

fame min.:, I

yielded

(

having

no

remedy, and being unmeet

tooppofetheir Wifdomsanyfurther): And

fo what they

Scored under we left

out, and prefented the reft to

his

Majefty after-

wards. But when we

came to prefent

it,

the Earl

of

Mantbefler

fecretly told the

reft, that

if

Dr.

Reignoldy

DY.

Bates,

and Dr.

Manton

would deliver

it,

it.would be

the more

acceptable

( intimating that

I

was

grown unacceptable

it

Court)

:

Bur

they would not go without me, and he profeft he defired

not

my

Excluflon

:

But

when

they told me

of

ir,

I

took my leave

of

him,

and was going away

:

But

and they carne after me

to the

Stairs,

and importuned

me

to ieturn,and

I

went with

them to

take

my Farewel

of

this Service. But

I

refolved

that

I

would

not

be

the

Deliverer

of

any

of our

Papers

(

though I

had

got them tranfcribed and brought

them

thither):

So

we defired Dr.

Manton

to

deliver

our Petition,

and

with

it the

fair

Copies

of

all

our

Papers

to the

Bifhops

( which

was

required

of

us

for the

King

).

And when Bithop

Reignoldr

hadfpoken a

few words, Dr. Manton deliver-

ed them to the King

;

who received them and

the

Petition, but did not bid

us

read

it at

all.

At laß,

in

his

Speeches,

fomething

fell in

which Dr.

Manton

told

him that the Petition

gave

him

a

full

account

of,

if

his

Majefty pleated

to give

him

leave

to

read

it

;

whereupon

he had

leave

to

read

it out.

The

occation was,a (bort

Speech which

I

made

to inform

his

Majefty how far

we were

agreed with

the

Bi-

Mr.cala-

limps,

and wherein

the

difference did

not lye,

as

in the

Points

of

Loyalty, Obe-

mó7

of

dience, Church

-

Order,

&c.

ThisDr.

Manton

alto fpake: And the

King put

the

this

time

Queßiore,

[

But

wbo!ball

be

judge]

And

I

anfwered him,

That

Judgment is

fick,or

either

publick

or private

:

Private

Judgment

called

Dif

retionis,

which

is

but

the

ufe

,emt

of a

of

my

Reafon

to condubt

my Abtions, belongeth to every private rational' Man,:

he

artwhieli

had

re

Pablick

fudgment

is

Ecciefaßical or

Civil, and belongeth accordingly

to the

É'zEle-

ceived.

frafbtoal

Governours

(or

Paffors) and

the

Civil;

and not to

any

private

Man.

And

this was the end

of

thofe Affairs.

§

239.1

will give you

the Copy

of

the

Petition juif

as

I

drew

it

úp, becante

t.Here

you may

fee

what

thofe words were

which

could

not

be

tolerated;

2.Becaufe

it

is

but

fuppofing the

under

-

fcored Lines

to

be blotted out, and you have

it

as

it was

prefented without any Alteration; For

thofe

under/cored Liner

were

all

the

words'

.

that were

left our.