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P

A

It

T

II.

Reverend

Mr.

Richard

Baxter.

403

242. And

now our Calamities began to

be

much greater

than

before

:

We

were

called all by

the Name

of

Presbyterians

( the

odious

Name )

:

though

we never

put

up one

Petition

for

Presbytery, butpleaded

for

Primitive

Epifcopacy. We were

reprefented in

the common

talk

of

thole

who thought it their Inrereft

to

be

our

Ad.

verfaries,

as

the molt

Seditious People,

unworthy to

be ufed like

Men

,

or

to enjoy

our common Liberty among them. We could

not

go abroad

but

we met with

daily Reproaches and

falfe Stories

of

us :

Either

we were feigned to

he

Plotting, or

to

be Difaffeaing the People,

&c. Andno

Sermon

that

'preached,

fcarce efèaped

the

Cenfure

of

being

Seditious,

though I preached only for

Repentance and Fait

,

and Morality and Common Vertue, yea,

if it

were-againft Difobedience and

Se-

dition,

all was

one

as

to

my Eftimation

with

thofe Men.

And the great Increa(er

of

all this was,.

that there were

a

multitude

of

Students

that ftudiedfor Preferment,

and many Gentlemen that aimed at their Riling

in

the World, who

found

out

quickly what

was

moft

pleafing

to

thole whofe Favour they muff rife

by,

and to

let-themfelves induftriouffy

to

Reviling, Calumniating and Cruelty, againft

all

thole

whom they perceived to be odious! And

he

that

can but convince

a

world-

ly Generation

of

any

thing

that's

the

ready

way to their Preferment,

!hall be

fore

to

have

it

clofely

followed, and throughly done with

all

their might.

§

243. Before

and

about this time many

Books (

if

fo

they may

be called )

were

written againft

me.

One

by

Mr.

Naafen

(forementioned

)

a

Juftice

of

Peace in

Worse;erfhire,

who

being

a

great Friend

of

the Papifts, had

fpoken

againft

me

on

the

Bench

atthe

Seffions

behind

my back, as

the Author

of

a

Petition againft

Po-

pery heretofore

:

and was angry with me forevincing to him

his

miftake,

remeti-

ty

and injúftice

:

And when he

raw

histime,

he had

nothing

elfeto

be

the fewel

of

his

Revenge,

but

that

very

Book

which

¡wrote

againft

the Papilis:'and

there-

in againft the killing

of

the King, which I aggravated againft the

Army

and the

Popifh Inftigators'and

Aaors:

But becaufe in

Anfwerto

the Papifts,

I

made their

Doctrine and

Praaife

of, King killing to be

work

than

thefe Sectaries were guilty

-of,

and thereupon recited what the Sectaries

faid

for

themfelves,

which the

Jefuites

,have

not

to

fay ;

-.

he

took

up

all

thefe Reafons

of

the Seaaries, and anfwered them

as

if

they had

been my

own, and

I

had, pleaded

for that, which

I

Condemned by

writing

ín

a

time when it

might have colt

me

my

Life,

when

the

Gendeman that

thus would have proved me

aTraytor,

did

hirnfèlf

as

under

the

Ufùrpers, and

took their Impofitions,

which

we abhorred and

refuted.

4

244.

And here

IIhallinfèrta

Paffage:not contemptible concerning the Papifts,

becautel

am fall'n

into

the mention

of

them.

In

Cromnells

days,

when

I was

writing that

very Book, and my

Holy

Commonwealth,

and

was

chargingtheir

Trea-

fans

and Rebellions on the Army, one Mr.

yams,

Stamfreld,

a

Reverend

Minifter

of

Glocefterfbire,

called on me,

and tod

me a Story

i

which afterwards he

fene

me

under

his

Hand, and

warranted me

to

publifh

it

i

which

was

this.:

One

Mr.

Atkins

of

Glocefterflare,

Brother.

to

Judge

Atkins,

being beyond

Sea,

with

others that had

ferved

the

late

King,

fell

into intimate acquaintance with

a Prieft,

that

had been

(or

then was) Governour

of

one

of

their

Colledges in Flanders:

They

agreed, not to meddle with

each other

about

Religion,

and

fo

continued their

Friendlhip

long.

A little

after

the King

was

beheaded, Mr.

Atkins

met

this

Prieft

in

London,

and going

into

a

Tavern with him,

faM

to

him

in

his

familiar

way,

[What

bufméeß

have

you bere?

I

warrant

you

come

aboutfome Roguery

orother

I.

Where-

upon

the Prieft told

it

him

as

a

great fecret, [That

there were

Thirty

of

them bere

in

London,

who

by

laftruitions from

Cardinal'Mazarine,.

did

take

care

of

f

ch

Aff

àirsj

and

bad

fate

in

Council,

and

debated

the

Queftion, Whether

the.

King (build

be

put

to

death

or

not

?

and

that it was

carried

in the

Affirmative,and

there

were

but

two

Voices

far

the

Nega-

tive,

which was his own

and

another,

:

And tbat for

his

part

be

could not

concur:

-wich

them

,

as

forefeeìng

what

mìféry this

would bring

upon

his Country!.

That

Mr. Atkin,

flood to the

Truth of

this,

but thought

it

a

Violation

of

the Laws

of Friendlhip,

to name

the Man.

I.

would

not print it without

fuller

Atteftation, left

it

lhould be a

wrong

to

the

Papifts.

But when

the King-

was ,rel'tored and felled

in

Peace, Itold

-it

occafionly

to

a

Privy Councellor, who not

advifing me

to

meddleany further in

it,

becaufe the

King

knew enough

of

Mazarine's

Delignsalready,

-:

I

let

it

alone. But

about

this

time

I met with Dr.

ThomasGoad,

and occafionally

mentioning

fuch

a

thing,he

[told

me that he

was

familiarly-acquainted with

Mr.

Atkins,

and

would

know-

the cer-

tainty

of

him, whether

it

were

true:

And

not

long after meeting him

again,

he

told me

that

he fpoke

with Mr.

Atkins,

and

that

he

affured him

that

it

was

true

:

but