Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  408 / 846 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 408 / 846 Next Page
Page Background

374

The

L

I

E

E

of

the

LIB.

j.

but he

was

loth to

meddle

in

the publication

of

it.

Nor

did

I

chink it p udence

my

felt

to

do it,

as

knowing the

Malice and

Power

of

the Papills.

Since this,

Dr.

Peter Moulin

bath

in

his

Anfwer

to

Pbtlanax A

glime,

declared

that

he is-ready

to

prove, when Authority will

tall

him to

it

that

the King's

Death and

the

Change

of

the Government,

was firft

propolèd both

to the

Sorborne;

and to the Pope with

his

Conclave, and contented to and concluded

for by

both.

§

245.

Another

Book

wrote againftme

was

( as

was

thought)

by

one

Tompkins,

a

young_Manof

All

-

Souls,

Son

to

Mr.

Tompkins

ofWorcefler,and a School-boy there

* Since

when I

lived

in

that County

:

He

called

it

The

Rebel's

Plea

;

being

a

Confutation

made Dr.

of

fuch

Paffages

in.my

Holy

Commonwealth,

as

he lean understood and

could make

.

Vat'

moll

odious.

All

thefe

Men made

me

think, what

one

advifed

the Papills

ro

do

mop's

for

the effeâual Confutation

of

the Proteftants

;

viz. Not

to

difpute

or

talk

with

Chaplain.

them at

all,

but to

preach every day againft them in the Pulpits tor there they

may fpeak without any

Contradiâion,

and need not

fear an Anfwer.

§

246. Shortly after our Difpuration at

the

Savoy,

I went to

Rickmerfwortb

in

Hartfordfbire,

and preached there but once, upon

tl?attb.

22.

12.

[And

be

was

fpeeeh-

leß

]:

where

I

fpake

not

a

word that

was

any nearer kin to Sedition; or that

had a-

ny

greater tendency to provoke them, than

by ;hewing

[that

wicked men, and

the

refuters

of

grace,

however

they may now

bave

many things to

fay

to excufe

their

fin,

will at

Taff

be'peecble6,

and

dare not

'land

to

their

wickedneß

before

God.]

Yet

did

the

Bi-

Ihop

of

Worcefler

tell

me, when

he Blunted me,

that

the Bilhop

ofLondon

had

(hew-

ed him Letters from one of the Hearers,

affuring him that

I

preached

Ceditioully t

fo little Security was any Man's

Innocency

(

that

difpleafed

the Bilhops) to

his

Reputation with that Party, who had

but one Auditor that dehred

to

get favour

by

accufing him.

So

that

a

multitude

of

fuch Experiences mademe perceive, when

I

was filenced,

that

there

was fome

Mercy in

it, in the midit

of

Judgment

:

for

I

Mould fcarce have

preached

a

Sermon, nor put up

a

Prayer to God, which

one

or

other

(

through Malice, or hope

of

Favour) would

not

have been

tempted to

ac-

cafe

as

guilty

of

fome heinous

Crime

:

And

as Seneca

faith,

He

that bath

an Ulcer

crietb

Oh,

if

be do

but

think

you

touched him.

§

247.

Shortly after my return to

London,

I

went

into

Worce'lerfbire

,

to try

whe-

ther

it

were poffble to

have

any honeft

Terms

from the Reading

Vicar

there,

that I

might preach to my former Flock:

But when

I had

preached twice or thrice,

he

denied

me liberty

to

preach any more

:

I

offered

him to

take my

Leâure,

which

he

was bound to allow me

(

under

a Bond

of

goo 1.)

s

but

he refuted it

:

I next

offered him to be

his

Curate, and he

refufed

it:

I next

offered

him to preach for

nothing,

and he

refufed

it

:

And laftly,

I

defired leave

but once

to Adminioer

the

Sacrament

to the People,

and

preach my Farewel

Sermon to them ; but he

would

not content. At

laft

I underftood that

he

was

direâed

by

his

Superiours

to

do what he did

:

But

Mr.

Baldwin

(an

able

Preacher whom

I left

there) wasyet

permitted.

§

248.

At

that time,

my

aged

Fatherlying in great

pain of the Stone and Stran-

gury,

I went

tovilit

him

(Twenty

miles

further):

And while I

was

there,

Mr.

Baldwin

came to me, and

told me

that

he alto

was

forbidden to

preach. We re-

turned both to

Ridderminfler,and

having

a

Leâure

at

Sheffnel

in

the

way, I preach-

ed there, andflayed

not to

hear

the Evening

Sermon, becaufe

I would make hafte

to the

Bithop.

It

fell

out that my turn at another

Leâure

was

on

.

the

fame

day

with

that

at Sbefnal

(viz.

at

Cleibury

in

Sbropfhire

alfo)

:

And

many were

there mec

in expeâation

to hear me

: But

a Company

of

Soldiers

were there

(as

the

Country

thought, to

have apprehended

me);

who

Ihm

the Doors againft the Miniftersthat

would have preached

in

my ftead (bringing

a

Command to the Churchwarden to

hinder

any

one that had notaLicenfe from the

Bithop

);

and the poor People

that

had comefrom

far

were fain to go home with grieved

hearts.

§

249.

The

next day it

was

confidently reported that

a

certain Knight

offered

the

Bilhop

his

Troopto

apprehend me,

if

I

offered

to

preach And the People

diffwaded me from going

to the

Bithop, fuppofing my Liberty in danger. But

I

went that Morning with Mr.

Baldwin,

and in the hearing

of

him and Dr.

Warm

-

ßrp, then

Dean

of

Worceßer,

I remembred the

Bilhop

of

his

Promife to

grant me

his

Licence, &c. but he refufed

me

liberty

to preaeh in

his Dfocefs, though

I

of-

fered

him

to preach only on

the

Creed

,

and the Lord's

Prayer

and

Ten

Com-

mandments, Catechiftical Principles, and only

to fach

as

had no preaching. But

the Difcourfebetween him and

meat

that time,

I

have had

occalon

lince particu-

larly