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P

A

F.

T

IL

Reverend

Mr

;',Richard

Baxter.

375

lady

to recite in my Anf

ver to

him, according

as

I

noted

it down

when

I

canio

home

;

and therefore

I (hail

here

pals

it

by.

And lince then

I

never preached in

his Diocels.

5

zyo. When he Silenced me, he told me

that

he marvelled

that I

fhould

think my own preaching

fo

neceffary,

as

to offer

to preach

for

nothing,

as

if

o-

ther Men

could

not do

as

much good

as

I

?

I

told him

,

That

when they

arcl,

had all done

our bell, there would

he

many Places unfuppiyed

;

and

asked

}rim;

Whether

he

thought that

loch an one

as

I were

not

better than none

!

He told inc,

That

he thought not meanly

of

my Abilities

;

but nil

I

was

better

affected

,

l

:.e

thought

they were

better that

had none.

I

urged him to

tell

me what

he

thought

was

the

Errour of

my Mind or Affetttons

,

and

what

he would

hate

uae

do

to-

wards

the

Cure? My

ErromS

he

would not

tell

ma

(lave

the ridiculous recital

of

that Sentence at

the

Savoy,

of

Sin

per accidena,

which

I

havé fpoken

of

in

my

Ari,

fiver

to

him at large

)

;

but for my

Cure

(

of

I

know not what) he

v.ould have

me read

Bilfon

and

Hooker.

I told

him that

was

not now to do

:

But

when,

at his

perfwaion,

I reviled

them,

I

admired at their Infatuation

, that

ever they fuffered

filch Books

as Hooker's

Eighth

Book,

and

Bishop

ßi

ton

of Obedience, .to

fee

the

Light

:

When

Hooker

goeth

Co

much further

than

the

Long Parliament

went,

as

to

affirm

that the

Legiflative

Power

is

fo

naturally belonging to the whole

Body ;

that

it

is

Tyranny

for a tingle

Person to exercife it, (Lib.

r.)

And that the King

is

f

gui

Major,féd

Ueaverfis.

Minor, and

receiveth

his

Power

from

the People

,

with

many

llore

Antimonarchical Principles, which

I

have confuted

in the Fourth Part

of

my Chriflian Direilory

particularly,

as

judging them

unfound.

And

in

that

excellent Book

of

ChriilianObedience,

bath

this paffage,

which

methinks fhould

make them burn it

,

and

not

commend

it

to

us

for

our Cure

,

[

Pag. gzo.

If

a

Prince

Amid

go about

to

fubjett

his

Kingdom

to

a

Forreign Realm,or change the Form

of

tbé

Commonwealth, or neglei` the

Laws

eflabl

fbed

by

common

Confer

of

Prince

and

People,

to

execute his

own

pleafure

:

In

thefe,

and

other

Cafes Which

might

be

named,

if

the

MI6'

and

the Commons

joyn

together

to

defend their ancient

and

accuflomed Liberty,

Regiment

and Laws,

they

may

not,

well

be

counted Rebels]

[I

never deny'd

that

the

People

might,

preferve the Foundation, Freedom

and

Farm.

f

their

Cosnmonwealth,which

they

fore

-

prized

when

they

firft confuted

to

have a King

.

Ifay,

the

Law

cf

God

giveth

tra

Man

leave

to

refill his

Prince

:

but

Ì

never

lard, that

Kingdoms

and

Commonwealths

night

not

proportion

their States ar

they

thought belt,

by

their

publick

Laws

;

which

afterwards

the

Princes

the

(elves

may not

violate.

By

[

Sáperiour

Paw(rt

ordained

cf

God

]

we under-

fand,

net

only

Princes, but all Politick

.States

and

Regiments

s

f

mewhere the People,

f

rm-

where the Nobles,

having

the

fame

Intereso to

the

Sword that

Princes

have in their Icing-

dome.

And

in Kingdomswhere Princes

bear

rue,

by

[the

Sword],

we

do

not mean

the

Princes

private

Will,

againfl bù Laws

;

but

his Precept

derived ikon,

his

Laws, and a-.

greeing

with

his

Laws

which though

it

be

wicked,

yet

may

it

not

be

raftfied

by

.any Sub

-

yell

with

armed

violence.

Marry,

when Princes

offer

their Subjeils,

not

]uflice,

but

Force,

and

delif

all

Laws

to

praílife their Lulls,

not every nor any

private

Man,

may

take

the

Sword and

redrefi the Prince

;

but

if

the

Laws

of

the

Land

appoint the Nobles,

am

next

the

King,

to

ffi

him in doing

right, andwithhold

him

from

doing

wrong, than

be they

lìcenfed

by

Man's

Law,

and

fo

not

prohibited

by

God's,

to

interpofe themfeloco

for

the

fafety

of

Equity and

Innocency,

and

by

all

lawful and

needful means

,

to

procure

the Prince

to

be

reformed

but

in

no cafe

deprived, where

the Scepter is

inherited

].

So

far

Bishop

Bilfon

to

whom

I

was

fent.

§

ap r. 'To

return to

Bishop Manley;

He told

me

when

he Silenced me,

that he

would

takecare that the People

should

be

no

lofers,

but

fhould

be

taught

as

well

as

they were byme. And

when

I

was gone, he got awhile a few fcandalous

Men,

with

Tome

that

were

more civil, to keep

up

the

Letture,

till

the paucity of their

Auditors

gave them a

pretence

to

put

it

down. And he came hinifelfone day and

preached

to

them,

a long

Invettive

againll them and me,

as

Presbyterians, and

I

know not

what

;

fo

that

the People wondered

that

ever a

Man

would ventura

to

come up

into

a

Pulpit, and

(peak fo confidently

to

a

People,that

he

knew

not,

the

thingswinch they commonly knew to

be

untrue. And

this

Sermon was

fo

far

from

winning

any

of

them to the eftimation of their

New

Bishop,

or curing

that

which

he called

the Admiration

of

my

Perlon,

(

which

was his

great endeavour

)

that they were

much confirmed

in their former Judgments.

But Gill

the

Bishop

looked at

Kidderminfler

as a

Faékious,

Schifmadcal, Presbyterian People,

that mull

be

cured

of

their over

-

valuing

of

me, and

then

they would

be

cured

of

all

the

reff:

Whereas

if

he had lived with them the

twentieth part

fo

long

as

I had

done,

he would

have

known that they were neither

Presbyterians,

nor

Factious

not

Schif.