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PA

R

T

II.

Revereiid

Mr.

Richard

Baxter.

'372

it

was

charged

upon them that

I

had perfwaded them

to

refute

this

Declaration;

till it

was

manifeft

that

I

had never once fpoke

a

word to them about

it,

nor writ-

ten

one Line

to

them about that

or

any

thing

elfe,

of

a long

time

:

At

flint

a di-

fiance

were we forced

to

remain.

§

25f.

After

a

fhort

time the Lord

Windfor,

who

was

Lord Lieutenant of the

County (and Governour

of

Jamaica), bought a

Houfe

in

the

Town,

and lived

among them

;

(

as

molt thought,to watch

over

them

as a

dangerous

People) which

turned to their great

Relief: For

before

his

coming, they were many

of

them

prifoned, and hardly ufed; but when

he lived

among them,

and faw

theirhonelf:y

and innocency,

they

have

had

Three

years

of

as

great quietnels and

liberty,

ra,

any

place I

know in the Land: When he

firft

came

thither

I

was

there, and went

to

wait upon him, and told him

(truly) that

I

was

glad

of

his

coming for my

Neighbour's

fakes

:

for an innocent People

are

never fo

fafe

as

under their Gover

hour's.

Eye

; teeing Slanders have

their power moft on ftrangers that are unac-

quainted with the

perfons

or

the things.

§

256. Jut}

at the

time

that the

Bithop was Silencing me,

it

was

famed

at

Lon

-

don

that I

was

in

the North,

in

the

Head of

a

Rebellion

!

And at

Kidderwinfter

I

was accufed, becaufe

there

was a

Meeting

of

many Mininers at my Houfe; which

was

no morethan they knew had

been

their

confiant Cufiom many

a

year,

to

vi-

fit me,

or dine with

me.

And while we were at

Dinner,

it

fell

out that by pub

-

lick

Order, the Covenant

was

to

be

burnt in

the Market-place

,

and it

was

done

under

my

Window

:

and

the Attendance

was fo final],

that

we knew

not

of

it

till

afterwards

:

Yet

becaufe

I

had preached the Morning

before

(

which

as

I

re-

member

was

my

laft

Sermon

there) upon Chrilt's

words

on the

Crofs [Father for-

give

them

; for

they

know

not

what

they

do]

I

was accufed

of it

as

a

heinous

Crime,

as

having preachedagainft the burning

of

the Covenant

:

which

I

never medled

with, nor

was

it

done

till

after

the

Sermon,

nor

did

I

know when

it

was

done,

nor mind it

;

nor

did

I

apply

the

Text

to

any Matters

of

thofe prefent

Times

;

but

only in general to perfwade the Hearers to the forgiving

of

Injuries,

and main-

taining Charity, in

the midst

of

the

greaten Temptations

to the

contrary

:

and to

remember that it

seas

the Tempter's

Deign,

by

every wrong which

they received,

to

get

advantage

for

the weakening

of

their Love to thofe that did it

;

which

therefore they

Mould

with

double care maintain.

This

was

the true !cope

of

that

Sermon which deferved Death or

Banifiunent,

as

all my Pacificatory Endeavours

had

done.

§

257.

When

I

came back

to

London,

my Book called [The

Mifchiefs

of Self

-igno-

rame and

Benefits

of

Self-

acgaaintance] was

coming out

of

the

Pref.;

:

And my

af-

feetion to myPeople

of

Kidderminfler

roofed

me,

by a fhort

Epinle

..

to

diredt

is

to

them,

and becaufe

I

could never after

tell

them publickly (being Silenced)

I

told

them

here the occafion

of my

removal from them, and

my filencing;

for brevity

fumming up

the principal

things

in my Charge. And

becaufe

I

Paid

[TIM

was

the Caufe]

the Bilhop tookadvantage,

as

if

I

had

Paid,

Thea

was

the whole

Caaf

]

when the Conference between him and me

was

half an hour long, and not

fit

to

be wholly

inferred in

a

fhort

Epiftle, where I intended

nothing

but

the

film.

But

the

Bifhop

took occafion hereupon

togather

upall

that

ever

he

could

fay

to make

me

odious,

and efpec)ally

out

of

my

Holy Commonwealth,

and our Conference at

the

Savoy; where he gathered

up

a

fcrap

of

an Affertion which he did

not

duly

underhand, andmade it little

lets

than Heretic

;

and

this

hepublifhed in

a

Book

called. A Letter

;

which

I

truly profels,

is

the fullçn

of

palpable

Untruths

in

Mat;

ter of

Faét,

that

ever

I

faw

Paper, to my remembrance in

all my Life.

The

words

which he would render me foabhorred for, are our denial

of

Dr.

Pierfon's

and

Dr:

Gunning's

&c.

Propofitions,

about the innocency

of

Laws which command Things

evil

by Accident only

:

where the Bithop never difcerned (unlefs

he

diffemble

it)

the

Reafons

of

our Denial,

nor the Proportion

denied

:

The

very

words

of

the

Difpute

being

printed

before, and

I having

fully opened

the

Bilhops

.Mifakes,

in

an

Anfwer to him,

I

(hall

not

here

hop

the Reader with

it

again.

§

258. But

this

vehement InveStive

of

the

Bithop's prefantly

taught

all

that

de

fired his

Favour, and the

improvement

of

his

very

great

Intereft for their Ends,

to`

talk

in

all

Companies at

the

fame

rates

as

he had done,

and

to

fpeak

of

me

as

he

had fpoken, and Bofe

that

thought

more

was

neceffary ro

their

hopes, prefented

the

Service

of

their

Pens.

Dr.

Bareman

of

Trinity Collage

wrote

a

Book,

without

his

Name, and

had no

other

deign

in

it than

to make me odious

;

nor

any

better

occafion

for

his

writing. than this

:

There

had

many

years before

pan..divers Papers

C

c c

-

between