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ANN

378

i

he

L

I F

h

of

the

Lis.!,

between Dr.

Thomas

Hill,. then

Mager of

Trinity

CoiIedge

in

Cambridge,

and

-

me, a-

bout the Point

of

I-

Phyfical efficient-

Predetermination as

neceJry

to every

Allion

natural

and

free

]:

I

had

written

largely

and

earneftly,

againff Predetermination,

and he a

little

for

it

:

In the

end

of

it

the Calamities

of

the Se&arian

times, and fume

Sickueffes

among my Friends, had occafioned me to vent my moan to him

as

my

Friend

;

and therein to

(peak

of

the

doubtfulnefs

of the

Caufe

of

the formerWar,

and what

reafòn

there

was

to be

diligent in

íearch and prayer

about

ir.

When

Dr.

Hia wasdead,

Dr.Boreman

came

to

fee

there Papers

:

BOth

the

Subjects

he

muff

needs

know were fuch,

as

tended rather

to my

Etteem

,

than to my

.Difparage-

ment with the Men

of

thefeTimes. Certainly the

Arminiant will be

angry with

no Man fer being.againf-Predetermination

;

and I think they will pardon him

for queftioning the Parliaments Wars: Yet did

this dilingenious Dr. make a Book

on

this occafion,

to feekPreferment

by

reproaching me,

for

he

knew

not

what:

But to make

up the matter,

he

writeth that it

is

reported,

That

I

kill'd

a

Man

in

sold

blood

with

my

non

hands in

the

Wars

s

Whereas God knoweth, that I

never hurt

a

Man

in

myLife,

rio never

gave

a

Man a

flroke

(fave

one

Man,

when

I

was a

Boy,

whole

Legg

I

broke with wreftling in jell

;

which

almoff broke

my heart

with

grief,

though

he was

quickly cured).

But

the Dr. knowing that

this

might

be loon

difproved,,cautiou(ly

gave

mefome

Lenitives to perfwade me to bear

it

patiently,

telling

me that

if k

be

not true,

I

am

not the

firft

that

have been thus

abufed

:

but for ought

I

know,he

is.

the

firft

that

thus

abated me.

I

began to write

an

Anfwer

to

thisBook

;

but when

I

faw

that Men

did but laugh

at it,

and thofe

that

knew

the Man

delpifed

it,

and diffwaded

me

from anfwering fuch

a one,

I

laid

it

by.

§

2

to. When the

Bifhop's

Inve&ive

was

read, many Men were

of many minds,

abort

the an(wering

of

it

:

Thole at

a

diftance

all

cried out upon me

to

anfwer

it

s

Thofe

at hand

did

all diirwade me,

and

told.

me

that

it

would be Imprifonment at

lealt

to

me,

if

I-did

k

with the greatefi

truth

and

.mildnefs poflible. Both

Gentle-

men

and

all

the City Minifters told

me,

that-it

would

not

do-

half

fo

much

good,

as

my Suffering-would

do hurt

:

and that none

believed

it but the

engaged

Party,

and

that

toothers

an

Anfrrer

was

not

necerfary, and to them

it

was

unprofitable,

for they would never read

it. And

I

thought, that the

Judgment

of

Men

that

were upon

the place, and knew how things

went,

was moft

to be regarded.

But

yet I wrote

afull

Anfwer to

his

Book,

(except

about the

words in my

Holy Com-

monwealth,

which were not to

be

fpoke

co)

and kept

it by me

,

that I might ufe

it as there

was

occafion. At

that

time Mr.

fofeph

Glanvile fent.me

the offer

of

his

Service

to write

in my Defence,

(He that

wrote

the

Vanity

of Dogmatizing, and

a

Trearife

for

the.

Praeooiflence

of

Souls,

being a Platonif,

of

free

Judgment

,

and

of

ad-

mired Parts, and now one

of

the Royal

Society

of.

Philofophers, and one that

had

a

too

esceffive

eftimation

of

me,

as

far'abovemy

defers,

as

the

malicious

Party

erred on the other

tide)

:

But

1

diffwaded

him from

bringing himfelf

into

Suffering,

and makinghimfelf

unferviceable for

fo

low

an

end

:

Only I

gave him

(and

no

Man

elfe) my

own Anfwer to

perufe,

which

he

returned with

his Approbation

of

it.

§

26o. But Mr. Edward

Bagfhaw

(Son

to Mr.

Bagßraw

the Lawyer, that wrote

Mr.

Bolton's

Life), without

my knowledge wrote

a

Book

in Anfwer to

the

Bilhops:

I could

have

wilst

he had

let

it.

alone

:

For

the

Man bath no great difputing Fa-

culty, but

Only

a florid

Epiftolary

Stile,

and

was

wholly

a

Stranger

to

me, and

to

the.

Matters of Fa&

,

and therefore

could

fay

nothing

to

them

:

But only being

of

a:Bold and Roman Spirit, he thought

that

no

Suffering

títould deter

a

Man from

the

fmallefl

Duty,

or

caufe

him to

hence

any uleful

Truth:

And I had formerly

Peen

a

Latin Difcourfe

of

his

againit Monarchy, which

no'

whit pleafedme,, being

a weak Argumentation for

-a

bad Caule.

So

that

I

defired no fuch

Champion

:

fhortly after

he

went

over

with

the E.of

Aoglefey,

whofe Iloufhold Chaplain he

was,

into

lreland,and

having preached there fome times, and returning back,

was appre-

hended, and

fens

Priloner

to the Tower: where he continued long till

his

Means

wassall:fpent.,

and how he

bath

lince procured

Bread I

know

nor. When he had

been Prifoner about

a

year,

it

feems

he was

acquainted with Mr.

Davis,

who

was

alb,

a

Prifòner in

the

Tower

:

This Mr.

Davis having been very ferviceable

in

the

Refforationof

the King, and having

laid

out much of

his

Eftate

for his

Service,

thought

he

might

be the bolder with

his

Tongue

and Pen, and being of

a

Spirit

which

fome called

undaunted,

but others,

furious,

or

indifeeet

at

belt, did-give

art

unmannerly

liberty.

to'his Tongue,

to accufe

the Court

of

fuch Crimes,

with

fuch

Aggravations,

as

being

a

Subje&,

I think

it

not

meet

to

name. Atlaff, he talkt

freely