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380

The

LIFEof

the

..IB.1.

pendents, and

fome few

Presbyterians,

raifed

it

as

a

common .Cenfure againit us,

that

if

we had

not been

fo

fotwardto

meet

the

Bilhops

with the

offers

of

fo

much

at firfl, and to enter

a

Treaty

-with

them without

juft

caule, we had

all

had

better

Terms,

and ftanding

off

would

have

done more

good

:

that,

though my

Perfon

and

Intsntiom

had

a

more favourable Cenfhre

from theta

than

lbme others,

yet

for

the.Abtian,

I

was

commonly cenfured by them,

as

one that

had

granted them too

much, and wronged my Brethren by entring into

this

Treaty,

oar of

too earneft

a

delire

of

Concord

wich

them.

Thus

were Men on both extreatns

offended

with

me;

and

ffound

what

Enmity,

Charity.

and

Peace

are like to meet

with

in

the

World.

But

when

thefe Papers

were printed, the Independents

conferred

that rte

had dealt faithfully, and fatisfa&orily: And indifferent men

faid

that

Realòn

had

overwhelmed the Caufe

of the

Diocefans,

and that

we

had offered

them

fo

much

as

left

them utterly without Excufe

:

And the moderate Epifcapal Men

lid

the

fame

:

But the engaged

Prelatift

werevehemently difpleafed,that

thefe Papers thould

thus come abroad.

(Though

many

of

them here

publifhed

were never

before

print-

ed,

becaufe

none

had Copies

of

them but my felf).

§

264. Bithop

Morley

told me when he Silenced me,

that our

.Papers would

be

anlwered e're long':

But

no Man

to

this day

(

that

ever we

could hear

of)

hath

anlwered them

which

were

uuanfwered; Either

our Reafons for Peace,

or our

Li-

turgy, or our

large Reply,

moan

Anfwers

to

Dr.

Pierfon's

Argument,

cí e.

only

Roger

L'Eftrange

the

writer

of

the

News Book,

bath

railed

out

a

great many words

againit

Come

of

them

:

And

a narnelefs

Authór (thought to

be

Dr.

Wommock)

bath

anfwered

one

part

of

one

Subject

in our Reply, which

is

about excludingall Pray-

ers from

the

Pulpit,

befrdes

Common Prayer

;

and

in very plaufible Language, he

faith

as

much

as

can be

faid

for

fo

bad

a

Caufe,

viz. for the

prohibiting

all

Extem-

porary Prayer in .the

Church..

And when he cometh to the chief

ftrength of our

Reafons,

he pafreth it by, and faith, that in anfwering

fo

much

as

he

did, the An-

fwer to the reft.may

be

gathered.And

to

all

the reit of the

Subje6ts

he

faith

nothing

:

much

lets

to

all

ourother

Papers.

§

265. Ail° another namelefs Author (commonly

falsi

to be

Sir

Henry Telverton)

wrote

a Book for

Bithop

Morley

againit

me:

But

neither

:.

he;

nor

Boreman,

nor

v

Wommock

ever raw me,

for ought

I

know

;

and

I

an

fare

he

is as

Brange

to

the

Caufe

as

to

me

:

For

he

taketh

is

out

of

Bilhop

Morley's

Book, and fuppoling

what

he

hath written

to

be

true,

he

findeth

Mine words

of

Cenforibus

Application, to

make

a Book of.

§

a66. And about the fame time

Sir

Robert Holt

a

Knight

-.

of

WanwickJbire

near

Bremieham,

(pake

in the ParliamentHoule agaiàft

Mr.

Calamy

and me

by

name,

as

preaching or praying feditioully

;

but

not

one

fyllable named

that

we

faid

:

And

another time

he

named nie for my

Holy Commonwealth..

§

267.

And about that time, Bithop

Morley

having preferred

a

young Man, na-

med Mr.

S

(Orator

of

the Univerfity

of

Oxford, a

fluent wit

-

About this time Mr.

Field,

ty

Saty

rift, and

-one

that.

was 1°metime

motioned to

me

to

be

my

a godly Minilter,

died

in

Poi-

Curate

at

Kidderminfier)

;

this

Man being Houlhold Chaplain to

ion,

and

abundance

were

im-

the Lord'Otrancellour,

was

appointed

to

preach before

the

King;

prlfoned upon alicio

U-

fanons of tome of

their

igegno-

where the Crowd

had

high Expectations of

Tome

vehement

Sa-

tant

Hearers.

tyr

:

But

when

lie

had preached

a

quarter of

an

hour,

he was ut-

terly at

a

fors,

and

fo

unable to recolledt himfelf,

that

he

could go

no

further

;

but

cryed

[The Lord

be

merciful'

to our

Infirmities

] and

fo

came down.

But about a

Month

after,

they

were refolved.yet that Mr.

S

lhould

preach the

fame Sermon before

the

Ping;

and

not lofe his.expe&ed Applaufe: And preach it

he

did

( little more than

half an hour,

with

no admiration at

all

of

the

Hearers)

:

And for

his

Encouragement the

Sermon was printed. And when

it

was

printed,

many

defired

to

fee

what

words they were

that

he was

(topped at the

firft

time

:

And they

found in

the

printed Copy

all

that

he had raid

fir(t, and one of

the next

Paflàges which he

was

to

have

delivered,

was

againit me for my

Holy Common-

wealth.

§

268.

And

fo

vehement

was

the Endeavour in

Court, City,

and Country to

make me contemptible andodious,

as

if the

Authours.had thought

that the

Safety

-

either of

Church

or State

did lye upon

it, and

all

would have

been fafe

if I

were

-bot

vilified

and hated. Infotnuch

that

Dureh

the

French Minifter that turned

to

-diem, and wrote for

them,had

a

fenfelef fnatch

at me

in

his-.Book

;

and

Mr.Stoope

the Paltor of

the

French

Church

was

batr'tfheds(or forbidden

-this

Land)

as

Fame

raid, for carrying over our

Debates

into

France.

So

cleat

any Stranger that had

but

heard and

fen

all this, would have asked,

What Monller

of Villany

is

this

Man

?

and