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PART

II.

Reverend

Mr.

Richard

Baxter.

383

you]

1

concluded you

were wore fcrupulem than

others were :

and

perhaps the

manner

of

your

refuting

it (

as

it

appeared

to

me)

might

make

me

think

you

were

not

very well

plea-

fed

with

the motion

t

And

this

it

is likely

Insight

fay,

either

to my

Lord

Chancellent or

o-

thers;

though

f

rioufly

Ida

not remember

that

I

flake

to

my

Lord Chancelour

at

all

concern-

ing

it.

But

Sir,

finceyou

give

me

now

that

mode reafon

for it

(

which

by

the

wily,

is

no

lug

reafon in

it

fèlf,

for

a

Tippet may

be

worn

without

aDegree ,

though a Hood can-

not ;

and

it

is no

faame

at

all

to

want

thefe

Formalities,

for

him

that

wauteth

not the

Subfiance

),

but,

Sir,

I

fayfince you

give that

realen

for

your

refufäl,

I

believe you,

and

jhall correti

that

.Llrflake

in

my

¡tif,

and

endeavour

to reítìfse

it

in

others,

if

any

upon

this

occafion,

have mifùnder(toadyeti. In

the mean

time

I

Pall

defite

your charitable

Opinion

of

my

fèlf, which

I(ball

be

willing

to

deferveupan

any Opportunity

that

is

offered

one

to do

yoú

Service, being,

S

I

R,

Your

very humble Servant

5o.

Earlet.

To

my honoured Friend

Mr.

Richard Baxter,

Thefe.

§

27r.

Before this, in

November,

many worthy Miniflers and others were impri-

foned

in many Counties

;

and among others,

diversof my

old

Neighbours in

War-

cefterfhire:

And

that

you may

fee

what Crimes were the

occafion,

I

will tell

you

the ftory of

it.

One Mr.

Ambrofe

Sporty,

(

a

fober, learned Minil'eer,

that

load

ne-

ver

owned the Parliament's Coutéor Wars, and

was

in

his

Judgment

for moderate

Epif

opacy

) had

a

wicked

Neighbour whom

he reproved for

Adultery

,

who

bearing him

a

grudge, thought now

he had

found

a

time to

(hew

it

:

FIe

(or

his

Confederates for

him)

framed

a

Letter

as

from

I

know not whom, direered to

Mr.

Sparry,

[That

loe

and

Captain

Tarrington,

fhould be

ready with Money

and Arms

at the

time

appointed, and that they

fhould

acquaint Mr.

Oafland

and

Mr.

Baxter

with

it

]

:

This Letter he pretended

that

a

Man

left

behind him under

a

Hedge,

who fate

down

and

pull'd outmany Leiters, and put them

all up

again

fave

this,

and went

his

ways,

(he

knew not what he

was,

nor whether

he

went).

This

Letter

he

bringeth to

Sir

febn

P

(the

Man

that hotly followedfuch work

;)

Who

fent Mr.

Sparry,

Mr.

Oajland,

and

Captain

Torrington

to Prifon

!

( This Mr.

Oafland

was

Minifter

in Bewdl

y,

a

fervent laborious Preacher, who had done

Ann-

dance

of

good in

converting ignorant ungodly People). And

he had offended Sir

Ralph Clare

in

being againit

his

EleItion

as

Burgefs

in Parliament

for

that

Town).

But who that Mr.

Baxter was

that the Letter named,

they

could

not

refolve

;

there

being another

of

the name nearer, and

I

being

in

London:

But the

Men,

efpecially

Mr.

Sporty,

lay

long

in Pailón,

and when the Forgery

and

Injury wasdete&ed,

he

had much ado to get our.

§

272.

Mr.

Henry Packfon

alto

our Phyficianat Ridderminfer, and many

of

my

Neighbours were imprifòned, and werenever

told

for what to

this

day

:

But

Mr.

Jackfon

was fo

merry

a

Man,

and they were

all

fò cheerful

there, that

I

think they

were

releafed

the fooner,

becauf

it

appeared

fo fmall

a

Suffering to

them.

§

273.

Though no

one accufed me

of

any

thing, nor

fpake

a

word to me

of

ir,

(being they

knew I

had long been near

a

Hundred

miles

off)

yet

did

they defame

me

all

over

the Land,

as

guilty

of

a

Plot:

and when

Men were

taken up and

lent

to Prifon, in other Counties, it

was

faid

to be for

Baxter's Plot

;

fo eafle was

it,

and

fo neceffary

a

thingit

teemed

then,

to call

fuch filth

upon

my

Name.

5

274. And though

through the great Mercy

of God,

I

had

long

been

learning

not to

overvalue

the

thoughts

of

Men,

no not

fo

much

as

the Reputation of Ho-

nett),

or Innocency,

yet

I

was

fomewhat wearied

with

this kind

of

Life, to

he e-

very day calumniated, and hear new Slanders railed

of

nie, and

Court

and

Coun-

try ring

of

that, which no Man

ever

mentioned to

my

face;

and

I

was oft

think-

ing to

go

beyond

Sea,

that I might

find

fame place in retired privacy to

live

and

end

my days in

quiemefs, out

of

the

noife

of

a

Peace

-

hating Generation

But

my

Acquaintance thought I might be more fèrviceahlehere, though there I-might live

more

in quietnefs

;

and having not

the

Vulgar Language

of

any

Couptry,

to ena-

ble