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386

2he

,:L_I

FAI

pf

the

,:''

1L I

B.

I.

M

the

Interef

of

the Church.and

Caufd.of Chrift,ihe.Lánd;was prepared for that

further Inundation of

Calamities,^(by

WarAna

:Plague,,ançl.;;Scarcity)

which

hach

Mice

b

ought

it

near to Defolation.

§z8r.

IE-

fel('out one

day.

in Mr.

Cdam?

Church

at.

Elldermanbury,that the

Preacher

filed,

and

the

People delired

Mr.

Calamy

to preach:

Which

he

did up-

He was im

an

confidence, that the

A

&

did not extend

to

filch an

Occafional Sermon ( tome

pn[oned L'

awyers

had told him fo).

But for this

he

Was

lent

tq

Ngy{gate,Jail,

where

he

con

-

3,a.4.

tinned in the Keeper's Lodgings, many daily,flacking

to

vilit

him,,

till

the Lord

e

56e. zed

Bridgman

(as

is

Paid)

had given it

as

his

Judgment,

Thar.,bie Sermon

was

not

within

lmini

alai

Penalty

el

the Abt.

And

O

what inlulting there was;bythat Party, in the News.

J

o.s

5

book,

and in

their

Difcourfes,.That

Calamy that

would

not

be

a

Brftiop

wa,

us

foil

r

And whenhis

Sermon

was

printed,

an Ìnveetive

aping

him came

put,. in Lan.

gorge

like

an

Inquilitor, that

(hewed

a

vehement

thirlt

jor:

Broo,

d.

But

pressons

in

the

fight

of

the

Lord, ù

the

Blood

of

his

holy

Ones,

:..

Ir

282. Abondance more were laid in Jails

in

maeiy'Çounties for preaching,

and

the vexation

of

the

Peoples

Souls was

increafed.

At

St. 4Ibans,

Mr.

fat

snake

the

ejected

Minifter, being

delired to preach

a.Funeral

Sermon.,ra

Captain

or,

Lieute-

nant

came in with

his

Piftol charged, and

(hot

one

of

rho

hearers dead

,

and the

Preacher

was

lent to

Prilon.

§

z83

.

There

were many Citizens of

London,

who

had

tliea

a

great Compatriot'

on

the

Minifters, whole Families were

utterly

deftitnte of. ..Maintenance, and

fain

they

would have relieved them, and

had

filch a

Method,çhat the Citizens

of

each

County

should help

the Minifters

of

that County

:

But

theydurlt

not do

it ,

left

it

were judged

a

c;onfpiracy

:

Wherefore

I

went for them

to

the Lord

Chancel-

lour,

and told him plainly

of

it,

thatCompaffron movedthem, but the

Sufpicions

of

thefe

Diftempered Times deterred them, and I

defined

to have

his

Lordfhip's

Judgment,

Whether

they

might venture to

be

fo

charitable without mifinterpreta-

tionor

danger?

And he anfwered, [Aye,

Gad.

forbid

but

Menfhouldgsvetheir

own

aCcerding as

their Charity

leads

them].

And

fo

having

his

precanlent

,1

gave it

them

for Encouragement.

But

they would

not

believe

that it

was.

Cordial, and

would be

any

Security

to

them,

and

fo

they never Muff venture upon

fuch

a

Method which

might

have made

their Charity

effeótual

;

but

a few

that

were

molt

willing,

did

much more than

all

the rett, and folicited thine

of

their

own

Acquaintance,for their

Counties Relief.

{{84:

And

here I think

it

meetbefore

I

proceed, to open the true

date

of

the

Conformi(is

and

Nonconformists in

England at this time.

I.

The

Conformifts

were

of

three

forts

:

'I,

Some

of

the

old Minifters

called

Presbyterians

formerly,

that

Conformed at

Bartholomew

Tide,

or after, who had been in poffeflïon

before the

King

came

in

:

Theft

were

all:,

of

feveral

forts:

Come

of

them were

very able

worthy Men

,

who

Conformed

did

Suhfcrihed upon this

Inducement

,

that

the Bithop

bid them

[

Do

Thin

their own

fence]:

And

fo

they Subfcribed to the Parliament's

words, and

put

their

own

fence

upon them

only by word

of

mouth, or

in

force

by.paper.

Some

of

them

read Mr.

Fullwood's

and

Stilemae's Books,

and could

not

anfwer them, and

tflërefore

Conformed:

For

no

Man ventured

to put forth

a full and fatisfaCtory

rlrifwer to them

for

fear

of

some

(Though

fomewhat was written before by Mr.

Crrjlos

,

and

"after

ly

Mr. Cawdry and others

):

Some were young raw

Men

that

were never verfed in

filch

kind

of

Controverfies

:

Some

were pertwaded

of

the`Gnfulnefs

of

the Parliaments War, and thence gathered that the Covenant,

be-

lt]

gg

in

order to

it, was

a

Rebellious

Covenant

,

and therefore not obligatory

:

And

ätf

br`,

things they thought were

finali.

Some had

Wives

and

Children

and Pover-

iY,'tvhich were great

Temptations to

them:

And molt

that

I

knew, when once

they inclined ro

Conformity,

slid

avoid

the Company

of their

Brethren,

and

never

asks' hem what

their

Reafons-were

againft Conformity.

'A'fecondtiòrfof

Conforinitts were

thofe called

Latitudinarians,

who were

tgo$fy

Coml

rsrlg

mÈn,

PI tse

f$s

or

Carte/ians,

and many

of

them

Armin an,

with

fine'

Adt

?ititins,

having mdre charitable

Thoughts than

others

of

the Salvation

of

fleáihens

and Infidels, and

fumeof them holding the Opinions

of

Origen,

about the

PfæeXiItence

of

Souls,

&r.

Thefe were ingenious Men

and

Scholars,

and

of Uni-

v f Fffir

}}'hciples,

and

free

abhorring

at

find

the

Impotitíon

of

thefe

little things,but

thíftkfhggthem'not

great enough

to flick at when Impofed.

Of

thief;

force

(with

Dgr

ara.

rhëit'i4.eader)

t?ved

privately

in Colledges and

fought not any Prefer

-

rltt{éñ4S

ii

he

VVbtid

ättrl

dthers

(et

themflves

to

rife.

Thefo