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388

The

LIEE

of

the,`--

B.

I.

r. Thofe that

are

high

Prelatifs

fay,

r. For

Epifcopacy,

it

is

of

Divine

Initiuui-

.on, and

perpetual Ufage in the Church, and

neceffary to

Order

among

the

Cler-

gy

and People, and

of

experienced

Benefit

to this Land,and molt

congruousto Civil

Monarchy

; and

therefore

not to

be altered by any

;

no not

by

the King

and

Par-

liament,

if

they

fhould fwear

it

:

Therefore the Oath

called

the Et ratera Oath

was

formed before the

War,-

to

Swear all

Men to

be

true

to this

Prelacy, and not

to

Change

it.

2.

Thofe that

are

called

Conforming Presbyterians,

and

Latitudinarians, both

fay

that

our Prelacy

is

lawful,

though not

neceffary ; and

that

Mr. Edward

Stil

lingfleet's Irenicon

hath

well proved,

That no

Form

of

Church Government

is

of

Divine Inftitution. And therefore when

the Magiftrate commandeth any, he

is

to

be obeyed. But force they

grew up to Preferment,

they grow

to be

hot for

the

Prelacy.

§

287.

Andtherefore

as

to the Covenant, they

all fay,

r.

That

the

,End

of

it

was

Evil,

viz.

To

Change the Government

of

the

Church, without Law, which

was

fetled

by

Law. z.

That

the

Efficient Caufe

was Evil

or Null,

viz. That the

Impofers had no Authority to do

it.

3.

That

the Matter

was

Evil,

viz.

to extir-

pate, and changethe Government

of

the

Church

by Rebellion and Combination

a-

gainft the King.

4.

That

the

Swearers

All

in taking

it

was finful,

for the

forefaid

Reafons. ç.

That

the

King's Prohibition and difowning it did

nullifie

all

the

Sub-

¡efts Obligations,

if

any were upon

them,

by virtue

of

Numb.

3o.

6.

That

the

People being

all

Subje&s,

cannot endeavour the Change

of

Church Government

without the King. 7.

That

King

Eberle,

took

not that

fame

Covenant, but ano-

ther.

8.

That

he

was

forced to it.

9.

That

he was virtually pre-engaged to

the

contrary Matter, in that

he

was

Heir

of

the Crown, and

bound

to

take

the Coro-

nation Oath.

r

O.

That

to

cult

fo

many Men

as

the

Bithops

out of

all

their

Ho-

iours

and

Poffel&ons,

is

Injuftice, which none

can

be

obliged

to

do.

r

r.

That if

it

werelawful

before

to endeavour

an

Alteration

of

the Governmentof the Church,

yet now

it

is

not,

when King and Parliament

have made

a

Law againtt

ir.

Thefe

are Mr.

Fu/wood's

and Mr.

Stileman's

Pleas,

and the

Sum

of

all

that

I

have

heard

as

to that

Point.

§

288. But further,

as

to

the Interpretation

of

the

Words

of

the

Declaration

hereabouts, the Latitudinarians, and Conforming Presbyterians, and tome

of

the

Prelatilts

fay

as

followeth

:

r. That the Declaration includeth not

the

King

,

when

it

faith,

[There

brim obligation

en

me or any

other

perfon

]:

which they

prove, becaufe

that

Laws are made only for

Subje&s, and

therefore are

to

be

interpreted asfpeak-

ing only

of

Subjeóts. 2. Becaufe

the

King

is

meant

in the

Counterpart,or Oble

&,

viz.

the

Government of

the

State,

which

is

not

to

be

altered. z.

They

fay

that

it

is

only

Rebellions

,

or other

unlawful

Endeavours ,

that

are meant by the words

[

to

Endeavour]. 3.

They

fay

that

by

[any Alteration]

is

meant only

[

any

Effential

Alteration

j

and

not

[

any

Integral

or

Accidental Alteration

j

of the Government.

4. And

the leadingIndependents

have

taught them

alto

to

fay,

that

this

Covenant

was effentially

a

League,

between two Nations upon

a

certain occafion,whichthere-

fore

(if

ever it

did

bind)

is

now like an Almanack outof date,

Et

ceffat

obligatie

ceffantibm perferni,

materiâ.&

fine. ç.

They

principally argue

that

all

Mens words

are

to

be

taken charitative, in the moli honest and favourable fence

that they

will

bear:

mach more the King's and Parliament's

:

Therefore Charity

permicteth

us

not

to judge

them

fo

inhuman, irrational,

irreligious, and cruel

,

as

to command

Men

to

be

perjured, and to change

the

constituted Government,

by

prohibiting

King, Parliament, or

People,

to do

any

thing which

belonged

to

them

in their

places.

Thelè

are

the

Reafons for

the

lawfulnefs

of

declaring

against

the Obligation

of

the Covenant.

289.

3.

In

the

fame

Declaration it

is

profeffed,

That

[

it

is not

lawful,

on

any

pretence

whatfoever,

to

take

up

Arms againfl

the

King,

or any

Comn:P

seated by

bin]

&c.

Concerning

this,

they

are

alfb

divided among themfelves.

One

Party

fay,

That

this

is

true univerfally

in

the proper

fence

of

the

words.

The

ocher

fay,

That

it

is

to

be

undedfood

of

fuels as

are

legally Commi(faoned

by him only ; and

that

if

he

fhould

Commiflion two

orthreeMen, or

more, to

kill

the Parliament, orburnthe

City, or to

difpoffefs

Men

of

their

Freeholds

,

it

were lawful forcibly to

refill.

Or

if

the Sheriff

be

to

raife

the

Palle

Comitatur

in obedience

to

a

Decree

of

a

Court

of

justice, to put

a

Man into

poffeflion

of

his

Houk,

hemay do

it forcibly,

though

the

Defendant

be Commifíioned by

the

King to

keep

it.

Becaufe

they

fay

that

the Law

is

to

be taken

fano

fenfe,and

not

as

may lay the Law-givers under

fo

heavy

an

Accufa-

tìon,

as

the literal unlimited

fence would do.

4290.