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.=_s

4,36

The

LIFE

of

the

L

I

B.

I.

42e.

/Old

now

came

in

the

Peoples

Trial,

as

well

as

the Minihers:

While

the

Danger and

Sufferings

lay on the Minihers alone, the People werevery cou-

ragions, and exhorted them

to nand

k

out,

and

Preach till

they went to

Prifon:

But when

it came

to

be

their own Cafe,they were

as

venturous

till they

were once

Surprized and Imprifoned ; but

then

their

Judgmentswere.much

altered, and (hey

,that

cenfured

Minihers

before

as

Cowardly ,

because

they preached not

publickly

whatever followed, did

now think that it

was

better to

preach often in fecret to a

few,

than but

once

or

twice in publick

to many

;

and

that

Secrecy

was

no

in

when

it

tended to the furtherance

of

the Workof the Gofpel,and

to

the

Churches

Good:

Efpecially

the Rich were

as

cautelous

as

the

Minifters. But yet

their

Meetings were

fo

ordinary,

and fo well known,

that it

greatly tended to the

Jailor's Commo-

dity.

§

430.

It

was

a great

Strait

that

People were in,

especially

that dwell

near any

bufie Officer,

or

malicious

Enemy

(

as

who

Both

not

?)

Many durit not

pray -in

their

Families,

if

above

four

Perfons came

in

to dine

with them. In

a Gentleman's

Houfe it

is

ordinary

for more

than

four,

of

Visitors,

Neighbours,

Meffengers,

or

one fort or other, to

be

molt or many

days at

Dinner with them

:

and then

ma-

ny durit not go

to

Prayer, and

fome durst fcarce crave

a Bleffing

on

their

Meat,

or

give God thanks for

it

:

Some

thought they might venture

if

they withdrew

into

anotherRoom, and

left

the

Strangers by themfelves

:

But others laid,

It

is

all

one

if

they

be

but

in

the fame Houfe, though

out

of

hearing, when it cometh to

theJudgment

of the Junices.

In

Louisa,

where the

Houfes are contiguous, force

thought if

they were in

feveral

Hodes,

and heard one another through the Wall

or

a

Window,

it

would avoid the

Law

:

But others

faid

,

It

is

all

in vain

while

the Juaice

is

Judge whether it

was

a

Meeting

or

no. Great Lawyers faid,

If

you

come on

a

vise

or

bulinefs,

though you be prefent

at

Prayer or

Sermon,

it

is

no

breach

of

the Law,

becaufe

you met

not

[en

pretence

of a

Religious Exercife

]

:

But

thofe

that tried them

faid, Such Words are

but Wind

when the Junices come

to

judge you.

§

4;

r.

And here

the Fanaticks called

Quakers

did greatly

relieve the fober

Peo-

ple

for

a

time

:

for they were

fo

refolute, and gloried

in

their Conaancy and Suf.

ferings, that they

affembled

openly

(at

the

Bull

and

Mouth

near dlderfgate) and

were

dragged away daily

to

the Common Jail

;

and

yet

defined not, but

the

rea

came the next

day

nevertheless:

So

that the

Jail at

Newgare was filled

with

them. Abundance of them died

in

Prifon, andyet they continued their

Affem-

blies

Hill

!

And the poor

deluded

Souls

would fometimesmeet only

to

fit

Dill

in

Silence

(when,

as

they

Paid,

the

Spirit

did not

fpeak)

:

And it

was

a great Que-

Dion, Whether

this Silence was

a Religions Exercife not allowed

by

the

Liturgy,

Ice.

And once upon

fome fuch Reafons

as

thefe,

when they were tried at the

Seffions

in order

to

a

Banithment, the

Jury

acquitted them

;,but

were

grievoufly

threat-

ned forit. After

that anotherJury

did acquit

them, and

force

of

them were

fined

and imprifoned

for

it. But

thus

the Quakers

fo

employed

Sir R.

B.

and the

other

Searchers and Profecutors,

that

they

had

the

lets

leifure

to

look after

the

Meetings

of

Soberer

men

;

which

was

much

to

their prefent

cafe.

§

432. And now

the

Divifions,

or rather the

Cenfures

of

the Non

-

conforming

People

againi

their Minihers and one another, began to

increase

:

which

was

long foreseen, but could

not

be avoided, and

I

that had incurred

fo much the

dif-

pleafure

of the

Prelates, and all their

Party,

by pleading for

the

Peace

of

the

Non-

conformins, did

fall

under moreof their

difpleafure

than any one

man

be

fides, as

far

as

I

could learn

:

And with

me

they

joyned Dr.

Bates, because

we

went

to

the Publick

Affemblies, and

alfo

to the Common Prayer,

even

to the

begin-

ning

of

it

:

Not that

they thought

worfe

of

us

than

of

others ; but

that they

thought that our Example

would

do more

harm:

For

I

mull bear them

witnefs,

that

in the mida of

all

their

Cenfures

of

-my Judgment and Anions,

they never Confuted my Affenions and Intentions,

nor

abated their Charitable

Enimation

of

me in

the

main. And

of

the leading

Prelates

I

had

fo

much fa-

vour in

their hottelt Indignation

,

that they thought

what

I

did

againl

their In-

terell

was

only in

obedience to my

Catfcience.

So

that

I

fee

by experience, that

hethat

is

impartially and fincerelyfor

Truth

and Peace

and

Piety,

againit

all Fa-

&ions,

(hall

havehis

Honesty

acknowledged by

the

feveral

Fanions,

which

his

Ani.

ons,

as

crofi

to

their Intereft, are detefted

: Whereas

he that joyneth with

one

of

the

Palliates,

(hall have

both

his

Perfon and

Anions

condemned by the

other,

though hilParey may

applaud both.

§433.