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Part

111.

7everend

Mr. Richard

Baxter.

The

Reafons

of

Men'srefufal

to

take this

Oath, were

fuch as

there following.

t.

Becaufe

they

that

were no Lawyers mutt Swear,

not

only

that

they

think

it

is

unlawful,

but

that it

is

fo

indeed.

z.

Becaufe

they think

that

this fetteth

a Commiffion above an

Aft of

Parliament.

And that

if

one by a Law be made

General

or

Admiral, daring Life, another

by

a

Commiffion may

catt

him

out

:

And thoughthe

Law fay, He

(hall

be

guilty

of

Trea-

fon,

if

he give up his

Trn4

to

any upon

pretence

of

a

Commiffion: Yet by

this

Oath

he is

a

Traytor,

if

he

refill

any

one

that

bath

a Commiffion.

3. Becaufe

they fear they are

to

Swear

to

a

contradiaion,

vi

K.

to

fet

the King's

bare

Commiffion

above

a

Law,

which

is

the

Aft of

King and Parliament

;

and yet

not to

endeavour

the

Alteration

of Government,

which

they

fear lea(t

they endeavour

by

taking this Oath.

4.

Becaufe

they think

that

by

this

means

the Subjea

Ihall

never room

to

any

cer-

tain

Knowledge

of the

Rule

of

his

Duty,

and confequently,

of

his

Duty

it

felf.

For

it

is

not

poffible

for

us

to

know,

i. What

is

to

be called a Commiffion,

and

.

what not

;

and

whether

an

illegal Commillion

be no Commiffion

(as

the Lawyers,

Rune

of

them, tell

us

)

and

what

Commiffion is

illegal,

and

what not

;

and

whether it

melt

have

the broad

Seal,

or

only

the

little

Seal,

or

none. 2.

Nor

can

we

know when

a

Commiffion is

counterfeit.

The

King's Commandersin the

Wars,

never

(hewed

their

CommiPiions

to

them

that

theyfought againit,at leap ordinarily.

Coll.

There

was a

*

Collonel of

the King's,

line

his coining

in,

that

brought

a

Com-

'7'

million, Sealed

with the broad

Seal,

to

feize on

all

the Goods of

a

Gentleman

in.

Biopfgate

flreet,

in

London; by which lie

carried

them

away

:

But

the

Commitlion

being

proved counterfeit,

he was

hanged

for

it. But

a

Man

that

thus Seizethon any

Gentleman's

Money,

or

Goods,

maybe

gone before they

can

try

his Commiffion,

if

they

may

not

refit

him.

But the Parliament,

and

Courts ofJuftice, are

the Legal,

of

the.

King's mind;. and

by

them theSubjefts can

have a

regular

certain

notice

of it.

So

thatif the

Parliament were

concluded

to

have no

part

in

the

Legiflative Power,

but the King's weer

will

to

be

our

Law ;

yet

if

the

Parliament

and Courts

of

Juftice,

.

be

eticd

as

the

publick Declarers

of

hiswill

to the

People,

they

Teem

more regardable and credible,

than thewordsof

a

private

unknown

Man,,

that

faith

he bath

a Commiffion.

5.

And

they

think

that

this

is

to

betray

to

the

King and give

the

Chancellour,,

or

Lord-

Keeper, power

at

his pleafure,

to

depofe

himSromh

his

Crown anddifpofléfs

him

of

liìs Kingdoms. For

if

the King

(by.

Law

or

Commiffion (hall

fettle any

Trufty

SubjeEl

in the Government,

of

Navy, or Militia, or Forts, and command

them

to

refift

all

that

would difpofïèf

-them;

yet

iftheLord

Chancellor have

a

de-

fign

to

depofe

the King,

and

(hall

Seal a Commitlion

to

any

of

his own

Creatures

or

Confidents,

to

take

potfeffion

of the

fail

Forts,, Garifons, Militia and

Navy,

none,

.

upon

pain

of Dcath,

muff

refill them,

but

be

taken

for Traytors, if they

will

not

be

Traytors

vea, though

it

were

but whillt they

fend

to

the

King

to

know

his Will. And

when

Traytors

have

once

got

poftèflion

of

all

the Strengths, the

de-

taaing

oftheir

fraud

will be

too late,

and

to

Sue

them,

at

Law will

be

in vain.

And

he

that

reniembreth,

That

our Lord Chancellor

is now

banithed, who lately

was-

the

chiefMinifter

of

State,

will

think that

tins

is no

needlefs

fear.

6.

And

they think

that

it

is

quite

agaìnt

the

Law

of God in Natnre,whichobligeth

us

to

quench a

Fire,

or

fave

the

Life

of

one chat

is alfattited

(much

more

of

our

(elves)

againt

one

that

would

kill him

;

and

that

elfe

we

(hall

be

guilty

of

Murder.

And

according

to

the proper

Senfe

of

this

Oath, If

tsvo Foot-boys

get froni the Lord

Chancellor-a Commiffion

to

kill all

the

Lords.and

Commons in

Parliament, or

to

fet.

the

City and

all

the Country

on

Fire,

no Man may by Force

of

Armsrefill

them;;

Lords

and

Commons may

not

fave

their

Lives by force,

nor the

City

their

Houfes:

AndbVthis

-way

no Man (hail dwell

ortravel in.fafety;

while

any Enemy

or

Thief

may

take

away his

Life,

or

Purfe,

or

Goods,

by

a.

pretended Commiffion; and

if

we

defend our

(elves,

but while we

fend

to

try

them,

we

are

Traytors:

and

few have

the

means

of

Och a

Tryal.

?.

They

think

by

this

means,

no-

Sheriff

may

by

the

Pofre Comitatea

execute

the

Decrees,

of.

any Court oft Jultice,

if

any-

can

but. get

a-

Coiumi(lion.

for the

con

--

trary.

S,They