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The

L

1

F

E

of

the

Part

ll[

S.

They think that Taxes

and Subcdies may

be

raifed thus without Parliaments;

and

that

all Men's

Elates

and

Lives

are at the

meer will

of

the

King,

or

the Lord

Chancellor

:

For

if

any be Commiflioned

to, take them

away, we have no remedy:

For

to

fay

that

we have

our -Anions

againl

them

in

the Courts

of

Jnlice

is

but

to

fay,

that

when

all is

taken away, we

may

cal

away

more

if

we had

it.

For what

good

will

the

Sentence

of

any

Court

dous,

ifit

pafs on

our

fide as

long

asaCom-

milTon

againit the Execution

of

that

Sentence mull

rich

be

refitted,

unlèfs a piece

of

Paper

be

as

good

as

an

Elate?

9.

And

they think

that

by

this Oath,

we Swear

to

difobey

the

King,

if

at

any

time

he command us

to

endeavour

any

alteration

of

the

Church-

Government,

as once

by this

Commifon to

fome

of

us,

he

did,

about the Liturgy.

t

o. And they think

that it

is a

ferving

the Ambition

of

the Ptelates,

and

an al-

tering

of

the Government, to

Swear

never

to

endeavour any alteration

of

Church-

Government

; yea,

and

to

put the

Church-

Government

before the State-Govem-

ment,

and

fo

to

make

the

Prelacy

as

unalterable

as

Monarchy,

and to twit/

it

by an

Oath into the unalterable

Conlitution of

the Government

of the

Land, and

fo

to

difable

the King

and Parliament from ever endeavouring anyalteration

ofit.

For

if

the

Subjefìs may

not at

any,

time, nor

by

any

means

endeavour,

the

King

will

have none

to

execute his

Will

if

he endeavour it.

And

if

Divines, who

Ihonld be

the

moll

tender

avoiders

of

Perjury, and

all Sin,

(hall

lead

the

way

in taking fach

an

Oath,

who can

expel

that

any

others after them

fhould feruple

it

?

And

it

was

endeavoured

to

have been

putupon the

Parliament.

1t. And

they think

that there

is a

great

deal

in the

Englfh Diocefian Frame

of

Church

-

Government,

which

is

very enful, and

which

God

will have all Men

in

their

places

and callings

to

endeavour

to

reform

(as

that

the

Bilbop

ofthe

lowell

de-

gree,

inlead of

ruling

one Church with the Presbyters, ruleth

many hundred.

i

Churches, by Lay

-

Chancellors, who ufe

the

Keys

of

Excommunication and Abfo-

lution, lac.) And they take

it

for an A&

of

Rebellion againft

God,

if

they fhould

Swear never

to

do the Duty

which he commandeth; and

fo

great

a

Duty

as

Church

-

Reformation in

fo

great

a

Matter

:

Ifit

were butnever

to

pray,

or

never

to

amend

a

fault in themfelves, they

durit not

Swear

it.

12.

This

-Oath

to

be

the

fame

in Senfe,

with

the

Et

cætera

Oath, in

the

Canons

of

1640.

_That

we will

never

confent to

an

alteration

of

the

Government,

by

Arch-

BJhops,

Bi(hops,

Deans, &c.

And

one

Parliament voted down

that,

and

laid

a heavy

chargeupon

it;

whichno Parliament

fine

bath taken

of:

t

3.

As the National VowandCovenant feemeth

a

great

Snare

to

hinderthe Union

of

the

Church among

us,

in

that it

layeth our Union

on an exclufion

of

Prelacy; and

fo excludeth

all

thofe learned worthy Men

fromour Union,

who cannotconfent

to

that

Exclufion;

fo

the

laying

of

the

Kingdoms and ChurchesUnion upon

the

Englífh

Prelacy, and Church-Government,

fo

as

to

exclude all

that

cannot

confent

to it,

cloth feem as

fire

an Engine

of

Divifion.

We

think that

if

our Union

he

centeredbut

inChrit/

the

King

of

all, and in

the

King,

as his Officer, and

our

Soveraign

under

him,

it

maybe

eafte

and fore But

if

wemull all

unite

in

the

Engle

Frame

of

Prelacy;

we

muff

neverUnite.

:. §

t g,

Thofe that take the Oath, do

(as

thofe

that

Subfcribe) refolve

that

they

will

underhand

it

in

a lawful Senfe

(be it

true

or falfe)

and

fo

to

take

it

in

that

Senfe

:

To

which end

they

fay

that

noliuminiquum

eft-

in

Lege

p

>afumendum,

and

that

all publick Impofitions mull

be

taken in the bell

Senfe

that

the Words

will

bear. And

by

force and

ftretching,

what

words

may

not

be well

interpreted?

But the Nonconformihs

go

on other grounds, andthink

that

about Oaths

Men muff

deal plainly and fincerely, and

neither

Stretch

their

Confciences,

nor the Words;

nor interpret

univerfal

Terms

particulary, but according

to

the true

meaning

of

the

Law

-

givers,

as

far

as

they

can

underhand

it;

and

where they cannot;

accord-

ing

to

the proper and

ufual

fgnification

of the Words.

And the Parliament them-

felves tell us,

That

this

is

the

true

Rule

of interpretingtheir

Words.

Beyondwhich

therefore

we

dare not ftretch

them.

§

16.

And therefore,

4..

They dare nottake the Oath,

becaufe

ifit

be

not

to

be taken in

the properor ordinary

Senfe

of

the Words, then they are fare that they

cannot

underlat

it

(for

it

doth not

pleafe

the Parliament

to

expound

it.)

And Oaths

mull-be

taken

in

Truth,

Judgment,

and Righteoufnefs, and

notIgnorantly,

when

we

know

that

we

underhand

them not.

§

t7.The