Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  495 / 846 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 495 / 846 Next Page
Page Background

Part

lit.

`Reverend

Mr. Richard

Baxter.

.

6. By

[Endeavouring]

here

he

únderfandeth

only .[unlawful endeavouring]

2nd

notPetitioning, or other

lawful

means

:

whereas

the

Word

in

the Oath, is

abfo-

Iute and unlimited ;

And

I

cannot be

fo

bold

as

to

Swear

[not

to

endeavour]

and fe-

cretly

mean

[

except

it

be

by

petitioning,

or other

lawful

means]

for

no

fober

Man

will

think,

that

we may do

it

by

unlawful

means,

if

he know

them

to

be

fo

:

And

the old.Et

cetera

Qáth, in

1640.

(the

Antecelfor

of

this)

had

[

hot

confentingj

which

could

not

be

fo

limited.

And further,

it

feems

plain,

that

this cannot

be

their

Senfe, becaufe

it

is equally

applyed

to both Governments

in

the

Oath (fave

thatthe

Church

-

Government

is

put

firth:

) And who dare

fay,

that

this

is

the

meaning,

as

to

the Government of the

-State

[I

will

not

endeavour the

depofing

of

the

King,

or

the

change

of

Monarchy,

unlefs

it

be by

lawful

means.]-Whereas

the

Oath

feemeth

to

me;

that

it

is

never

to

be done-

at

all;

and no means is lawful

for

filch

an

Aid

:

And therefore

we mull fo

under -

Itand

it,

as

tothe

Diocefanes

too

;

if

we will

not

Swear abfolutely,

or

univerfally,

and mean

limitedly,

and

particularly, yea,

and limit, and

not

limit

the

fare

Word,

as

refpefting the

feveral

Governments, without

any colour

from

the Terms.

17. Lastly,

When the

Oath Sweareth

us

[not

at

any time

to.endeavour] which is

as plainly an

Exclulve of

Exceptions

as

to Time,

as

can

briefly

be tattered, he

thinketh that

by

[

any

time]

is,

meant, [any

time,

except

when

the

King(hall

command

me the contrary,

or

the

Law

foal

change,

&c.]

Now

when fo much violence

mutt

be

ufed

with the Words

of

filch

an

Oath, and

whenthe

Impofers will

not (after

many Years

knowledge

of

our Doubts and Diffi-

culties)

make

them any plainer

;

and

fo

whenthey are

at the

beth

to

us fo

unintelli-

gible,

and no Lawyer,

nor Parliament, that

we

can fpeak

with,

can

refolve

us ;

but

all

the Anfwer

we can

get from the Parliament

Men,is

[You

muff

understand

it

in

the proper, ufuai

Senfe

of the

Words:]

And from the Lawyers,

[

An unlawful

Commi¡fion is

none, and lawful Endeavours are

not forbidden

]

who

can

take

filch

an

Oath in Judgment

and

llprightnefs of Heart, that

is fatisfied

in the Points fore-

mentioned?

§ zo.

The Aft

whichImpofeth this

Oath,

openly

accufeth

the

Nonconformable

Minilbers

(or

fame

of

them)

of

Seditious

Do(trine;

and

fuch

hainous

Crimea

:'

wherefore when

it

firtt

came

out, I thought

that

at

fuch

an.

Accufation no Innocent

Perfons

fhould be

filent;

efpeciatly

when

Papishs,.

Strangers, and Pofterity

may

think,

That

a

Recorded Statute is a

fuf

lcient

Hifhory

to

prove

us

guilty

;

and

the

Concernments

of

the

Gofpel,

and our Callings, and Men's Souls,

are herein touch-

ed

:

Therefore I drew

up

a

Profefion of our judgment, about

the

Cafe

of

Loyalty

and

Obedience

to

Kings and

Governours

;

and the Reafonswhy we refnfed

the Oath.

But reading

it to

Dr.

Seaman,

and fume

others wifer than

my felt,

they

advifed me

to

cast

it by,

and

to

hear

all in filent

Patience;

becaufe

it

was

not

poffible

to

do

it

fo

fully

and fincerely,

but that the

malice

of

our Adverfaries would makean illufe

ofit,

and

turn

it

all againfh

our

felves

:

And

the

wife Statefmenlaughed

at

me,

for

thinking that

Reafon would

be regarded by

fuch Men as we

had

to

do

with, and

would

not

exafperate them

the more.

§

ai.

After this, the

Minitlers finding

the

preffure

of

this

Aft

fo

great,

and

the

lofs like

to

be

fo

great

to.

Cities

and Corporations,

force

of

them ftudied

how

totake

the

Oath lawfully:

And Dr. Wil.

Bates,

being much in feeming,Favour

with the

Lord

-

Keeper

Bridgeman,,confultad

with

him, who promifed

to

be

at the next

Selllon,

aad there

on.

the

Bench

to

declare openly,

That

by

[

Endeavour.]

to

change

the

Church-Government

was meant[only lawfulEndeavour:]which fatisfying

him,hethere-

by fatisfied

others,who

to

avoid

the Imputationof

Seditious

Doftrine,were willing

to

go

as

far

as,

they Burl'

:

And

fo

Twenty

Minifters

came

in at

the

SefGons,

and

took-

the Oath, viz. Dr.

Pates, Mr.

Sam.

Clarke

Mr.

Sheffield,

Mr. Hall,

or

Mr. Church,

Mr.

Matth.

Pool,

Mr.

Loot!,

Mr.

Stancliffe,

Mr.

Roles,

Mr.

Lewis,

Mr.

Smith,

Mr.

Arthur,

Mr.

Balboa,

Mr:. Brooks,

Mr. Overton, Mr.

Batchelor,

Mr. Cary,

Mr.

Butler, Mr. ElidIore, Mr.

Hooker.

And,

not long

after,

Dr.

acomb

took

it,

ande

Mr. Mayo, and Mr. Newton

oflaunton in

Somerfetfhire,

being

then

in

London:

Mr.

kohn Howe

in

Devonfbire; and in

Soraerfetíbire,

Mr. William Thomas, Mr.

Cooper

of

Southmark

(then

there.:)

And in

NortbarnVtonfhire,

Dr.

Conant

(late

Regius

Profeffor

of

Divinity, and

Vice-Chancellor

in Oxford) and about

Twelve

more

with

him:-

I

heardof

no

me-,:

e Nonconfin milts

that

took it.

§ aa. Dr.