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The

LIFE

of

the

Part III.

§

22.

Dr.

Bates

wrote

me

prefently the following

Letter,

which

becaufe

it

fheweth

the

Truth

of

their

Cafe

and Inducements,

I

think

meet here

to

add;

the

rather,

becaufe

when they took

the Oath, the Lord

-

Keeper left out the

Word

[only.]

And

Judge

Keeling

openly

told

them,

That

he

was

glad

that

fo many

of

them

renounced

the

Covenant,

with

more

fuch

like;

which made Mr.

Clarke

openly

tell

him,

That

they took this Oath only in

furls

a Senfe as

they

conceived

to

be

not

incontinent

with

the

Covenant:

And

becaufe

the

People

in London

reviled the

Mi-

nifters

as

Turn

-Coats when they had done

; which Infultings

and Revilings

much

grieved

fome

of

them.

Dr.

Bates's

Letter of their

Cafe about

the Oath.

Dear Sir,

fudge

it

due

to our

Friendfhip,

and

neceffary

for

my

Fame,

to

give

you an

account

of

1

what

pall

amongfl

us

in

Reference to the

Oath.

Infeveral

Meetings

of

the

Minifters,

the

pedal

Enquiry

was

about the meaning

of

the

Word

Endeavour,

Whether

to

be

un-

derftood in the

univerfal

Extent,

fo as

to exclude all Regular, or

only

tumultuous

andfedi-

tinas

Alfings. The

Reafons which

perfuaded

us

to

underftand

it

in a

qualified

Senft,

were

I.

The

Preface

to the

All,

which

declares,

the eccaf

on

and

the end

of

the

Oath,

was to

prevent

the

diflilling the Poifon

of

Schifm

and

Rebellion;

now

it

is

a

known

Rule,

ratio

juris

eft

jus

;

from

whence

it

appears,

That

only

Schifntatical

and

Rebellious

Endeavours are

ex-

cluded, to

avoid

which, there

was

an

antecedent Obligation. 2.

It

is

neceffary to

interpret

this Oath

in congruity with

former

Lams

; in particular,

with

that

which concerns

tumul-

tuous

Petitions

wherein

this

Parliament

declares

it

to

be

the

priviledge

of

the Subjefl

to

com-

plain,

remonftrate Petition

to

King

or

Parliament,

or to

advife

with any

Member

ofPar-

liament,

for

the altering

of

any thing ami

fs

in

the

Government

of

Church or

State, Efta-

blamed

by

Law.

If

Endeavour

be

taken

in its

Latitude,

it

is a perfell contradillion to

this Law.

3.

The Teflimonies

ofeveral

Members

of

both

Houfes,

who

affured

us

that in

the Debate, this was the declared

Senfe

of

the

Parliament. Sir

HeneageFinch

told

me the

intention

of

it

was

only

to have fecurity

from

us, without any refpelt

to our

judgments

con-

cerning

the

Government,

that

we

would

not difturb the Peace,

and that

it

was

impofd

at

this

Seaton, en

regard of

our

Warr

with

France and

Holland.. He

added,

it

was

a

teffera of

our Loyalty,

and

thofe who

refufed

it,

would

be looked on

as

Perlin

referving

themfelves

for

an

Opportunity.

My

Lord

Chamberlain

laid,

the

Bops

ofCanterbury

and

W

inchefter

declared,

it

only

excluded

Seditious

Endeavours ; and

upon his

urging

that

it

might

be

exprefTed, the

Arch

Bifhop

replyed,

It

fhould

be

added

;

the

King

being

to

come

at

Two of the

Clock,

it

could

not,with

that

Explication

be

Pent

own to

the Houle

of

Commons,and returned

up

again

within

that

time.

The

Bop

ofExeter

told

Dr.Tillotfon,

That

the

firft Draught

of

this Oath was in

Terms a

Renunciation

of

Covenant;

but

it

was

anfwered, they have

fuffered

for that

already,

and that

the

Minifters

would

not recede,

it

was therefore rcafonable

to

require

fecurity in filch Words,

as

might not

touch

the Cove-

nant.

4. The concurrent

Opinion

of

the

fudges,

who

are

the

Authorized Interpreters

of

Law,

who

declared

that

only

tumultuous and feditious Endeavours

are meant.

fudge

Bridgman,

Twifden, Brown, Archer, Windham, Atkins,

who

were

at London,

had agreed in

this

Senfe. Some

of

the

Minifters

were

not

fatisfied,

becaufe the Opinion

of

a fudge

'in

his

Chamber was

no

judicial

Alt;

but

if

it

were

declared

upon the Bench,

it

mould much

refilve

their Doubts.

I

addreffed my

Self

to

my

Lord Bridgman, and

urged

him

that

fence

it

was

a Matter of

Confcience,

and

the

Oaths

were

to

be

taken

in thegreateft'

fmplicity,

he

would

fincere

y

give

me his Opinionabout

it. He

profef

fed

to

me,

that

the

Senf of

the

Oath was,

only to

exclude

feditious and tumultuous Endeavours, andfaid,

he would

go

to

the

SeJfons,

and

declare

it

in

the Court.

He

wrote down the Words

be

intended

to

/peak, and

upon

my declaring,

that

if

he

did not

expref that

[only

feditious

Endeavours]

were

meant,

I

could

.not take the

Oath:

he

put

in the Paper (before

me) that

word,

and

told me,

that fudge Keeling

was

of

his

Mind,

and

would

be

there,

and

be

kind

tit us.

The Minifters

efteemed this the

molt

publick

Satisfaction

for

Confcience

and Fame,

and

fevered

of

them agreed togo

to the SeJfioni,

and

take the

Oath, that

hereby,

if

po]jble,

they