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Part III.

Reverend

Mr.

R

ichard

Baxter.

15

they

might vindicate

Religion

from

the

Impntat

ion

of

Fadbon

and

Rebellion,

and

make

it

evident

that

Confciences only

bsndereth their Conformity.

Sono

of

the

melt unfatisffed

were

refolved

to

take

is. We

came in the afternoon

on

Friday

to

the

Court

where

feven

Minì-

fters

bad taken

it in

the D4ornmg

At

our

appearance the

Lord Bridgman addreft him-

fidf

to

us

in theft Words:

Gentlemen,

I

perceive

you

are

conte

to

take the Oath

I

am

glad

of it

:

The intent of it

is

to

diftinguifh between

the King's

good Subjel

}s,

and thofe

who are mentioned in

the

Af

and

to

prevent

Seditious

and Tumultuous

Endeavours to

alter the

Government

:

Mr. Clark

/71d

,

in

this ffnfe

we

take it. The

Lord

Keeling

fp.rke

Ion-b./Cone

quicknef Willyou take

the

Oath as

the

Parlsamenr

hash

ap-

pointed

it.

I

replyed,

My Lord,

Weare corn

hither

to

atteft

our Loyalty

and

to

declare,

we

mil

not feditsoufly endeavour

to

alter

the

Government.

Ile

was

filent and

we took

the

Oath,

being t

3

in number.

After

this

the

Lord

Keeling

told

ne

,'

He

was glad

that

fo

'many

had taken the

Oath;

and

with

great yehesnencyfàid,

We

had renounced

the

Covenant

(

in two Principal Points

) that

damnable

Oath

, which flicks

between the

Teeth

of

fofinny. And

he hoped

7

hat

as 'here

was

one

King,

and

one

Faith,

fo

!here

mould

be

one

Government: sand

if

we

did

not

Conform,

it

would

be

judged

we

did

this

to

fave

a

flake. Theft Words

being

uttered , after

by

his Silence

he

had

approved what

myi

Lord

B. had_fpoke

of

the Senfe

of

the

All,

and

our

errpref

Declaration, that in that

Senfe

we took

it;

you may imagine

bow

furprizing

they were to

us:

It

was not pogible

for

as

to

recalled

our

felves

from

the

Confufion

which

this

caufed,

fo a5

to

make any

rep

y.

We

re-

tired

with faelnefs,

and what

the

confeqùences will

be

.;

you may eafly fore

-fee. Some

will

'reflect

upon

us

with

feverity,

judging

of

the

nature of

the

Alden

by

this

check'

of

Providence.'

Others

who

were

refolved

to take the

Oath,

recoil

from

it;

their fealoufies

being

increafed.

,(hall trouble

you

no

longer,

but a(fure

you

That

notwithftanding this accident

cloth

not

invalidate

the Reafons

for

the lawfùlnefo

of

it,

in

our apprehe ons ;.

yet

the

forelight of

this

would

have

caufed

no

to

fuf

end our

proceedings.

The good Lord

fandifie

this Providence,

to

us

and

teach

no

to commit our dearefl Concernment.; unto

bins, in

the

performance of

our Duty, to

whofe

Protection

I

commend

you;

and remain

London,

Feb.

22.

Yours

intirely;

William

Bates.

After

my

Lord

Keeling's

Speech, Sir

Sohn Babor

enquired of

Lord

Bridgman,

whilif

he wason

the Bench,

Whether the Minigers

had renounced

the Covenant?

He

anfwer'd the Covenant

was

not

concerned in it.

.

Mr. Calamy,

Watfon

Gouge;

Mid

many

others,

had

taken

the

Oath this

Week,

but

for thisunhappy Accident.

My

Lord

Bridgman came

to the

Séffions, and declared

the

Senfe

of

the

Oath,

with

my,

Lord Chancellor's

allowance.

But

all

the

Reafons

contain'd this Letter feem'd not

to

me

to enervate the

force

Of

the fore-going Ob'jeetions,

orfolve the

Difficulties.'

§

ïq-

A little

before

this,

L.

B.

and Sir

-

-_S. committed

fach

horrid

wicked

-

nefs

in their Drinking

(aging

the

part of Preachers, in their Shirts

sin

a

Balcony;

with

Words

and

Anions not to

be

named,) that

one

(or

both ) ofthem

was

openly

cenfured

for it in

Weltminfler

-Hall

by one

of theCourts of

Juffice

(

You

will fay,

Sure

it

was

a

lhameful

Crime indeed.)

And

Ihortly

after a Lightning did

felze

on

the

Church where

the Monuments

ofthe

-were,

and

tore

it,

melted the

Leads,,

and

brake

the

Monuments

into

fo

fmall

pieces,

that the

people

that

came

to

fee

the

place

,

putthe

Scraps ,

with the Letters

on ,

intotheir

Pockets

,

to

Mew as'a

Wonder,

and

more wonderfulthan the confiunptionof the

red

by fire.

25.

lnthis

timethe Haunting

of

Mr.Mompeffen's

Houfe in Wilt/hire,

with grange

Noifes and

Motions,

for very

many Months

together ,.

was

the

Common

Talk;

Of

which Mr.

fof

Glznvilhaving

wrote

the

Story;

I

fay

no more.

§

26.,

The

Number

of

Minifters

all

thiswhile either imprifoned

fined,

or other-

Wifeaffiftedfor

preachingChrift'sGofpel, whenthey

were

forbidden,

wasfogreat

that

I

forbear

to

mention

then

particularly.

§ 27.

The

War

began with the

Dutch

whom

the

French

of

fted.

§ 28.

The

Plague which began

at

Afton

quÿ

29.1.665. being

ceafed

on

March:

i,-

following,

I

returned home;

and found

the

Church-yard like

a

plow'd

field

with

Graves

, and many

of

my

Neighbours

dead;

but

my Houfe'

(near

the

Church

-

yard),

dninfecled`