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Part

Il.

Reverend

Mr. Richard

Baxter.

l

§ 32.

It

was a

fight

that

might

have

given any

Man

a

lively

fence

of the

Vanity

of

this

World,

and

all

the

Wealth

and

Glory

of it,

and of the

future conflagration of

all

the

World.

To

fee

the

Flames

mount uptowards Heaven,

and proceed fo

f

arionf-

ly

without

reltraint: To

fee

the

treets

filled

with

people aftonilhed,

that

had

farce

fente

left

them

to

lament

their own

calamity..

To

fee

the

fields filled

with

heaps

of

Gods,

ari

fi

mptuons Buildings, curious Rooms, coftly

Furniture

and Houlhold-

Stnfeè

Yea,

Warehoafesand

furnifhed

Shops

and

Libraries;

&c.

all

on

a

flame, and hone

durf

come

Hoar

to

receive any

thing.

To

fee

the King

and

Nobles ride about the

treets,

beholding

all

thefeDefolations, and none could afford

the

leaf

Relief.

To

fee

the

Air,

as

far

as could he

beheld,

fo filled

with the

fntoak,

that the

Sun

fhinedthrough

it,

with

a

colour like Blood

;

yea even when

it

was

fetting in the

Weff,

it fo appeared

to

them

thatdwelt

on

the

WeJf

fide

of the City.

But

the

dolefalleí't fight

of

all was af-

terwards,

to

fee

what

a ruinous confufed place

the City

was, by Chimneys and

Stee-

ples onlyLanding in the

midi

of

Cellars and heaps

of

Rubbtm

;

fo

that it

was

hard

to

know where

the

treets

had been, and

dangerous,

of

a

long time

to

paf

through the

Reines,

hecaufe

of

Vaults, and fire

in

them. No man

that

feeth

not

fach

a

thing,

can

have

a

right apprehenlonof the

dreadfulnefs

of

it.

§ 33.

The Extent

of

the Fire (confüming the City within the

Walls)

calleth

to

my remembrance,

that

a

Fortnight before,

one Mr. Caril, a Gentleman

of

a

great

Elate

in Suffix, and faid

to

be one

of the

molt underftanding and fober

fort of

Pa-

pifts, firftfent; and

then

come

to

have vifited me, as

earnetly

defiring my Acquaint-

ance;

and

then fent

me

a

Paper to anfwer, being Exceptions againft the

Preface

to

my book, called,

The efe

Religion;

written

by one

that

profeffed

great

Refpedt

to

me, and

a

delire

to

debate thofe Controverfies

with me; (and

it

proved to

be Cref/y,

the

Champion

that

at

that

time

was

moltforward

and

fuccefsful

in Difputes.)

And in

that

Paper, fpeaking

of the

Pope's

Licenfing

Whore-

houfes

at

Rome; he

faith,

that

it

is

werfe in

London,

where are.whole Erects

that

have

not

fo much

as

the

Rebuke

of

any Penalty,

but

when they die,

the

Churchmen

bury them

as

the

refs,

with

confi-

dence,

that

God in mercy

bath

taken

to

himfelf

the Sauls

of

tbofe

dear Brethren

and

Sifters

departed.

I

anfwered

his

Paper,

and

tothat

'mirage

faid,

That

I

was

not

acquainted

in

the

Suburbs

(towards the Court)

:

but

I

never heard

of

any

fuch

thing

;

and

if

he

knew

it,

he would do

well

to

tell the Magiftrates (who

know

it not)

whatItreets thofe

be:

But

for the City, within the Walls,

my Acquaintance

more enabled

me

to fay,

that

I

did not believe

that there

was

in

all

the

World

filch a

City for Piety, Sobriety

and Temperance. And

about

a

Fortnight after, that

part

was

burned, and

the

rat;

that he

accufed,

did

efcape.

§

34.

And this

is

the

Third terrible

Judgment

which

London

fuffered,

fence

the

King's Return. Firft,

many

fcoreof their

Faithful

Teachers were

filenced, and

cat

out,

and

afterwards hanilhed,

or

confined Five Miles

fromthe

City:

And next, in

1665:

the

Plagueand

other

ficknefs confomed

about an Hundred

T

houfand

:

And

when they

began

to

be fetled in

their

Habitations again,

the

Flames

devoured

their

Hodes

and

their

fübitance.

And

it

is

not

hard

for the

Reader here

to

imagine

how

many

Thonfands this molt

needs

cat

into

utter Want

and

Beggary

:

And

how many

Thonfands

of theformerly

Richwere difabled from

relieving them. And how dole-

ful

the

Cafe

then mutt

needs

be, whengood people,

that

were

wont

to

relieve

others,

were call into

filch

diftrefs, and

few

able

to

help them And

at the

fame

time

fo ma-

ny

Hundred

Families

of

filenced

Minifters

to

be

relieved,

that

looked

to

London

molt

for

Help.

And after the

Fire

the Charitable

weredifabled ; and

alfo

were

lit

no finali

traits

cvheo

they

had

a

little to

give, between

the

Minifters and

the diltrelfedCiti-

zens, whom

to

give

it

to

:

filch

are

eafilier

heard

of

than felt. And

it

was

not

the

leaf

part of the

Calamity,

that

when people faw

the Number of the indigent

to

be

fo great,

that

when they had done

their

bet,

it

formed as

if

they

had

done nothing;

and alfa

that

on

this pretence,

other lying

Beggars

pretended themfelvesto

be London-

ers,

it

difcoeraged many

from doing what they

couldand

ought.

§ 35.

Amongothers,

the Famoufet

Perfon in

the

City, who pnrpofely

addi$ed

himfelf

to

works

of

Mercy, was

my

very dear Friend, Mr. Henry

.Jhurft,

a

Dra-

per (a

man

of the

Primitive

fort of Chritians

for

Humility,

Love, Blamelefsnefs,

Meeknefs,

doing good

to

all as

he was

able,

efpecially needy filenced

Minters

(to

whom, in

Lancafhire

alone,

he allowed

coo

1.

perAnn.

and in

London

was

molt

famous

for their

forcconr),

and

doing

hurt to

none. His care now was

to

folicit

the

Rich

a-

broad for

the relief

of

the poor

honet

Londoners

:

And

Mr.

Thomas

Gouge

(the

fi-

lencec?

Miniter of

Sepulchres

Parifh,

Son

to Dr.

Will. Gouge,

and

fuch

another

man,

C

e c e

who