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16

The

LIFE

of

the

Y.

I B.

I.

g.

They

faid

that

it

was

againfl

the Subjeas

Liberty

;

which alloweth them

fb-

berly to Petition the King

and

Parliament for a Redrefs

of

any Grievance.

And

if

now

a

Lay

-

Chancellor's ufe

of

the Keys,

C.

g. were no burden

to the

People,

we

know

not

how God may

make fuch Alterations

by

his

Providence,

as

may

make

that

a

Grievance which

now

is

none.

6. And they faid

it

was

a$ainh the

Priviledges

of

Parliament,

that

fuch

an

Oath

fhould be

devifed and

impofed upon

the Snbjeds, without a Law,

or the

Parlia-

ments confent.

Thefe and other

Reafons were pleaded againft

it

:

(

And

afterward when

the

Parliament

took

it

into confideration,

it was

Condemned on

thefe and

other

Ac.

counts).

The

Minters

of

the Country met together at

Bridgnorrb

to Debate this

Bulinefs,

that they might

have

Divifion

:

and fome

few were

for

the.

Oath,

but

more againit

ir.

This put

me upon deeper Thoughts

of

the

Point

of

Epifcopacy,

and

of

the

EngliJh

frame

of

ChurchGovernment than

ever

I had

before

:

and now

I

had the opportunity

of

feting

fome Books,

which

I

never had

before.

My

very

dear Friend,Mr:Wiliam

Rowley,(á

Gentleman

of

Shrewsbury)

fent me

Gerfomw

Bree.

raw

his

Differtatio

de

Gubernatione

Ecclefiee,

and

Didoclaves

Altare

Damafcenum;

and

fhortly

after

I

had

Parker

de

Polit. Ecckf.

and

Baynes's DioceJanes

Trial

;

and

I

received

Bifhop Downbam, and

compared

his

Reafons

with

Bracers,

Didoclaves,

&c..

And

though

I

found not fuflicientEvidence to prove

all kind

of

Epifcopacy unlawful

,

yet

I

was

much

fatisfied

that the

Engli(h

Dioeefan

frame,

was

guilty

of the Cor-

ruption

of

Churches and

Miniftry, and of

the ruine

of

the true Church Difcipline,

and fubftituting an heterogeneal thing in

its

Read.

And

thus

theEr

c.erera

Oath, which

was impofed on

us

for the unalterablefub-

je&ing

of

us

to Diocefans,

was a

chief

means

to

alienate me

and many others from

it. For now

our

drowfie

mindlefnefs

of

that fubjeïl

was

11

aken

off

by

their

vio-

lence

; and

we that thought it belt to follow our

bnlinefe,

and

live

in

quietnefs,

and let the

Bishops

alone, were rowzed bythe terrours

of

an

Oath

to

look about

us,

and underhand what we did.

§

z;.

This Oath

alfo

furred

up

the differingParties

(

who before were

all

one

Party,

even

quiet

Conforms)

to

fpeak

more bitterly againfi one

another

than

here-

tofore

:

And the dilfenting

Party

began

to think better

of

the

Caufe

of Noncon-

formity,

and to honour the Nonconformifts more than they had done. And

it

fell

out that at the

fame

time when we were

thus

rowzedup in

England,

or

a

little

before, the

Scots

were

alfo

awakened

in

Scotland:

For when

all was

quiet there

under

a

more moderate Epifcopacy than we had then in England, ( though

that

Nation

had been ufed to

Presbytery)

a

new Common-

Prayer

Book

(

that

is,

the

EnglsJh

onewith force few Alterations)

was framed,

and impofed

on

the

People

of

Scotland

;

who having

not

been

ufed

to that way

of

Worfhip, one Woman

in

E.

denburgh

cried out in

the

Church,

Popery, Popery,

and threw herStool at

the

Prieh;

and

others

imitated her prefently, and drove him out

of

the

Church;

and

this

little

Spark

fet

all

Scotland

quickly in

a Flame.

Infomuch

that

other

Places

taking as

much

diftafte

at

the

Common Prayer,and at the

.Bifhops alfo

for

its

fake,andfor

fear

of

the

Silencing

of

their Minihers,

and force Minifters increafing

their diftafte, the

Lòrds prefently were

divided

alfo ;

infomuch

that

the King

was

fain to inflruét

the

Earl ofTrequaire,

as

his

Commiffìoner, to

fupprefs

the Malecontents

:

But

in

a

lhort time

the

number

of

them

fo,encreafed, that the

King's Commiffsoners

could do no good

on

them, but they got the power of all the

Land,

becaufe

the

far greateft part

of

the Nobility with the Miniftry

*ere

conjoyned.

Hereupon

they

all

entered into

a

National Covenant, to the

fame purpofe

as

formerly

that

Nation

had done,

but they

did

it without the

King's Authority.

The Oath or

Covenant

was

againh Popery

and Prelacy and Superhision, and

to

uphold the

Gofpel

and

Reformation.

The

Aberdeen

Doctors diffented from

the Covenant, and

many Writings pall

on both

fides

between the Covenanters and them,

till

at lait

the

enfuingWars did

turn the

Debates

to another

Brain.

§

24. It fell

out unhappily

that

at

the

fame

timewhile

the

Scots

were

thus

dif.

contented, the King had impofed

a

Tax

here, called

Sbip-money,as

forthe

hrength-

ping

of the Navy

;

which being done without Content of Parliament, made a

wonderful murmuring

all

over

the Land ,.efpecially among the Country

No-

bility and

Gentry;

for they took

it

as

the overthrow

of the Fundamental

Laws

or

Conftisution

of

the Kingdom

,

and

of

Parliaments, and

of

all

Propriety.

They

Paid

that

the

Subjella Propriety

in

hisEflate;

and the

Being

of

Parliaments,

and

that

no

Laws

be

made,

nor

Moneys taken from the

Subje&s,

but by

the

Par-

liaments Confenr, are

part

of

the

Conhitution of

the Republick

or Government.

And