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Ig

the

L

1

FE

of

the

Part

III

who

made

Works of

Charity

a

great

part of

the

bufinefs

of

his

Life,)

was

made

the

Treafurer

:

And

once a

Fortnight they

called a

great Number

of

the

needy

together,

to

receive

their

Alms.

I

went

once

with

Mr.

Alkali to

his

Meeting,

to

give them an

Exhortation

and Counfel,

as

he gave

themAlms, and

faw

more

can

e, than

I was fenfì-

ble

of before,

-to

be

thankful

to

God,

that

I

never

much needed

relief from

o

thers.

§ 36.

It

was

not the

leaft obfervable

thing

in

the

time

ofthe

Fire, and

after,

con-

fidering

the late Wars,

and

the

multitudes ofdisbanded

Soldiers?

and

the great grief

and difcontent of the

Londoners,

for the

Silencing and Banilhrng

of their

Paftors

that

yet there were heard in the time of

their

Calamity, no

pafGonate

Words of

difcontent or

dilhonour againít

their

Governours,

even when

their

Enemies had fo

oft

accufed

them

of

feditious Inclinations,

and whenExtremity might

poffibly have

made

them defperate.

§ 37.

But,

yet

alas!

the

Effeft

of

all

there dreadful Judgments

was

not

fuch as

might

have been hoped

forAbut

ftill one Party

caft all

the

Caufe

uponanother,

and

the two

Extreams didlook more

at

each

other's

Faults

than

at

their

own.

There

was

no

confefling

the

Sin

of

Perfecution,

or Electing ChriE's

Minifters by

the

one

fide,

but they

jultified

their

ways,

and hated thofe

that

differed

from them,

as

much

as

ever

:

There

was

no lamenting

the Corporation

PERJURY

by

the

Citizens

that

had

taken the Declaration and

Oath,

and had

fucceeded

them

that

were

put

out, be.

caufe

they

feared an Oath.

There

was no

lamenting former

Scandals,

Rebellions,

or

Divifions, by

the other

Extreme

;

but the

Dividers cryed

out its long

of

the Per

-

fecutors, and

the

perfecuters cryed

out,

its long

of the

Schifmaticks,

and

it

is

God's jolt

Judgment on

the City,

that

bath

been fo

much againft

the

King

and

the

Bithops ;

and

God

would

not pardon them tho the King

did:

So

that while

each fide called

the other

to

repentance

they didboth

fly from repentance more andmore

:

And

if

there were

not

between them

a

fober

party, that

lamented

fin

molt

but were

guilty

of

leaft.

We

fhould

fee

no

Prognofticks

of

any

thing

but utter

defolation.

§ 38.

The

great talk at this time

was,

Who

were

the

burners

of

the City

?

And

there

came

in

fo many

Teftimonies

to

prove that

it

was

the plotted

weapon

of the

Papifts, as miffed

the

Parliament themíelves

to

appoint a Committee

to

enquire

after

it,

andreceiveinformation

:

Whereupon

a Frenchman

(proved

a Papift

at lait, tho

the

prodigal

Son

of

a

French

Proteltant)

confeft

openly and conftantly

to the lait, that

he

began

the

fire,hired

to it

by

another

French

PapiJt(a debauch'd

fellow)that

was gone

:

The

Man was

fent through

all

the

ruines, and

(hewed

them truly

the

houle which he

fired(where

it

began),

which

then the Neighbours

themfelves

could

not

eafily have

done. For which he was

tryed at the

Sellions?

and

upon

his confiant

Confefon

was

condemned and hanged. Sir

Robert Brooks

being

Chairman

of

the

Committee, abun-

dance

of

Teftimonies were received

;

that

in

many

parts

of the

City

men

were

feen

to

call fire balls into

the

houles

;

and

forne

ftrangers taken with fiery materials

is

their

pockets;

and force

that

were taken firing

houfes

were brought

to

the Guard of

Soldi-

diem, and

to

the

Duke

of

Tork,

and never heard

of afterward

:

With

more

Inch

mat-

ter

out of the

Countrey where Divers

Papijts

foretoldthe

fire;

And

tile Teftimonies

were lhortly after Printed,

which

is

the

reafon why

I give

them

to

you no

more par

-

cularly. And

many

ftories

go

about

with

very credible and undenied Reports,

that

be not in the Printed papers:

As

that of

Sir

Francis Peter

(a

Jefüited Papift) who

had

Lodgings in

Holborn,

next

to

a houle

that

had flood empty

fine

the

plague

:

Where

a

finoak

breaking out,

caufed

the Lord

Cravan and

the Lord

AJtley

to

leek

to

quench

the

fire ;

but they

were

fain

to

break open Sir

Francis Peter's

Doors,

becaufe he

would

not let

them

in:

And afterward

he

defended hisftayers

with

his

fword,

and wounded

one

Man

before

they

could

apprehend him

And

they found between the two

houles

upon

the Glitters,

a fire

kindled with bed-mats and

Inch

like

things,

which they put

out

:

But the matter

was filenced and no

more

Paid

of it.

In

Shropflire a Papift came

to

Sir ThomasWolrich, and

took

his

Oath

that

one

of the

Pendrils

brethren that

had

hid

the

King after

Worcefter

flight,

had

told

him before,

that

London

would be thortly

burnt.

Many

other

filch

teftimonies were given in

;

but

it

came

to

nothing

; and Sir

Robert

Brooks

the Chairman of the

Committeee, went fhortly after into

France, and

as

he

was

ferryed over

a

River

was

drowned

(with

his

Rinfinan) and

the

bufinefs

medled

with

no more.

that

the'difcontented Citizens

feared

not to

accule

the Courtiers,

as

the factors of the

Pa:ifts in

the plot

;

the rather

becaufe

that

fume

cryed

out re-

joycingly, Now the Eebelllons City

is

ruined,

the

King

is

abfolate, and was never

King

indeed

till

now.

put of the

rest

I

refer

you

to the

Printed

papers.

§39.