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26

The

LlFEof

the

I.,IB.Iö

rather than they that

provide

not

for

their Families° when

Infidels have

not

thought their

Lives

too good tofave the Commonwealth. And

as

for

a

War,

the

danger of

it

may

be avoided

:

It

is

a thing uncertain, and therefore

a

prefect

certain Ruine,

and

that

by

our

own hand,

is

not

to

be chofen to avoid

ir.

TheeKing

may

fee

thedanger

of

it

as

well

as

we, and avoid

it

on better

Terms

:

Or

if he

were willing, he may

not

be able

to do any great harm

:

Do you think that

the

People

of

England

are

fo

mad,

as

to

fight

agar&

chafe

whom

they have chofen

to

reprefent them

?

to

deltroy

themfelves,

and the

hopes

of

their Pofterity

?

Do

they

not know

that

if

Parliaments

be deftroyed,

their

Lives

and

Effaces

are meetly

at

the

Will

and Mercy

of

the

Conquerour

?

And do

not you

fee

that

the People are

every wherefor the

Parliament?

And for

Revenge;

what need

we fear

it

when

the

Parliament maycontinue

till

it content

to

its

Diffolution

?

And fure

they will

not

confect till they

fee themfelves

out

of

the danger

of

Revenge]. Such

as

theta'

were

the

Reafonings

of that Party

whichprevailed.

But otherstold them,

That

thofe

that adhered

to

the

Bithops

,

and were offend-

ed at the Parliaments Church Reformations,

would be

many

;

and the King will

never want Nobility

and

Gentry to

adhere to him

;

and the Common

People

will

follow their Landlords, and be

on

the Itronger fide: and the intelligent part,

who

underhand their own

Intereffs, are but

few :

And when you begin

a

War

,

on

know not

what you do]. Thus were Mens minds then in

a

Divifion: but fume

unhappy

means

fell

out

to

unite them

fo

as

to

caufe

them to proceed

to a

War.

4

39.

The

things

that heightned former

Difpleafures

to

a miferable

War were

fuch

as

follow, on both Parts: On the Parliamentspart were principally,

e.

The

Peoples indifcretion

that

adhered to

them;

2.

The

imprudence

and violence

of

fòme Members

of

the Houle, who went

too high

:

3.

The

great Diffidence

they

had of the King

when

they

had provoked him.

On

the other

fide

it

was

battened, r.

By

the Calling up

of

the

Northern Army.

2.

By the King's impofrng

a

Guard upon the

Houfe.

3.

By his

entring the Houfe

to

accufe

Come

Members. 4.

By

the mifcarriage

of

the Lord

Digby

and other

of

the King's

Adherents.

y.

But above

all

by

the

terrible

Maffacre

in

Ireland,

and

the

Threatnings

of

the Rebels to Invade

England. A

little

of

every one

of

thefe.

440 r.Thofe that

delred

the ParliamentsProfperity were

of

divers forts.Some

were

calm andtemperate, and waited

for

the Fruitsof their Endeavours

in their

feu.

fon

:

And

Tome

were lò glad

of

the

hopes

of

a

Reformation, and

afraid

left

their

Hearts

and

Hands lhould tall for want of Encouragement,

that

they too

much

boalted

of

them, and

applauded them

:

which mutt

needs offend

the King,

to

fee

the People

rejoyce in others

as

their

Deliverers, and

as

faving them

from him

;

and

fo to

fee

them preferred in Love and

Honour

before

him.

But force were

yet more

indifcreet

:

The

remnant

of

the

old Separatifts

and Anabaptifts in

London

was

then

very fmall, and fcarce confiderable

; but

they were enough to ftir up the younger

and unexperienced

fort

of

Religious

People, tofpeak too

vehemently and intempe-

rately againft the

Bithops

and

the Church

and Ceremonies, and to

jeer and

deride

at the Common Prayer, and

all

that

was

againft their

minds

:

(For

the young and

raw fort

of

Chriftians

are ufually

prone to

this kind

of

Sin;

to

be

fed

:conceited,

petulant,

wilful,- cenforious,

and

injudicious

in

all

their management of their Dif-

ferences

in Religion, and

in all

their Attempts

of

Reformation)

:

Earning and

clamouring at

that

which they think evil, they

ufually

judge

a

warrantable

Courte:

And it

is

hard

finding any fort

of

People in the World, where many

of

the more

unexperienced are

not

indifcreet, and proud

and paflionate.

Thefe

hired

up

the Apprentices

to

joyn with

them in Petitions

,

and to go

in

great numbers to

Wefimanfler

to prefent

them

:

And

as

they went

they met

with

Lome

of the

Bithops

in

their

Coaches going

to the Houle

;

and (as

is ufual

with

the

paflìonate and indifcreet

when they

are

in great Companies) they too much

forgot Civility, and

cried

out,

No

Bii)hspr

;

which either

put them

really

into

a

fear, or

at

leaft

fo difpleafed

them,

as

gave

them

occafion

to meet

together, and

draw

tip

a

Proteftation

againft any Law which in their Abfence

fhould be

palled

in

the

Parliament,

as

having themfelves

a place

there, and

being,

as

they

faid,

de.

terred fromcoming thither

by thofe

Clamours and Tumults.

This Proteftarion

was lb

ill

taken by

the Parliament,

as

that the

Subfcribers

of

it

were voted Delinquents, and

feet to Prifon,

as

going about to deftroy

the

pow-

er

of Parliaments

;

(and among them

even Bithop

Halt

himfelf).

There