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P

A to

T

I.

Reverend

Mr.

Richard

Baxter:

27

Thefe

numerous Petitioners

alfo

were very

offenfive

to the

King, infomuch

that

once fome

of

his

Cavaliers came

out upon them

armed

as

they

paffed

by

Whitehall,

and

catcht

fume

of

them, and cut

off

their Ears

;

and

Sir

Richard

Woman leading

them,there

was fome

Fray

about

Weflminfter

-Abbey

between the Cavaliersand them,

and

Sir

Rkbard

Wifeman

was (lain

by

a llone from

offthe

Abbey

Walls.

And when

at

laft

the King

forfook

the City,

thefe

Tumults were the principal

Caufe alledged

by

him,

as

if

he himfelf had not been

fafe.

Thus

ralh Attempts

of

Head-

ftrong

People, do

work againR the good Ends which they

themfelves

intend

;

and

the

Zeal which bath

cenforious Strife

and Envy, doth tend

to Con£ulon,

and every

evil

Work

:

And

Overdoing

is

the ordinary way

of

Undoing.

§

4r.

2.

And

force Members

of

the Houfe did cherub thefe Diforders

;

and

becaufe

that the

Subje

&s

have liberty to Petition, therefore they made

de

of

this

their Liberty

in

a

diforderly way. When they

had difgraced

Ship

-

money, and the

Et

cetera

Oath,

andBowing towards Altars, and

filch

things

as

were againR Law,

they Ropt not there, but

fee

themfelves to

caft out the

Bifhops

and the

Liturgy

which

were

fettled by Law.

And though Parliaments may draw up

Bills

for repealing

Laws,

yet her:

the King

his

Negative Voice,

and without

his

Confent they can-

not do it

;

which though they acknowledged,

yet

did

they

too

eafily

admit

of

Pe-

titions againft the

Epifopácy

and Liturgy, and connived at

all

the

Clamours

and

Papers which were againR them.

Had they

only

endeavoured

the

Eje&ion

of

Lay Chancellors, and the reducing

of

the

Dioceffes

to

a

narrower Compafs, or the letting up

of

a

Subordinate Difci-

pline, and only the Corredting and Reforming

of the

Liturgy

,

perhaps

it might

have been borne more patiently ; but fume

particular Membersconcurred with

the

Delires

of the imprudent

Reformers,

who

were for no

left

than the utter Extirpa-

tion

of

Bifhops

and Liturgy

:

To

which purpofe the Lord

Brook

wrote

his

Book

againR Epifcopacy.

And inthe

Houfe

of

Commons

Sir Henry

Vane

endeavoured

to draw

all up

to the

bigbe$ Refolutions, and by

his

Parts and Converfe drew ma-

ny

(fo far)

to

his

mind.

And

alfo

the

fent of

the younger

left

experienced fort

of

theMinifters and private Chriftians

in

the

Country,

was

muchagainit

amending

the

Bifhops

and

Liturgy,

and thought this

was

but to

guild over

our Danger,

and

loft

our

Opportunity

;

but they were

for an utter Extirpation. Though none

of

all this was

the

Senfe

of

the Parliament, yet thofe Members which were

of

this

Opinion

did

much to encourage

the Petitioners, who in a

diforderly

manner

la-

boured to

effect it.

The

Bifhops themfelves

who were accounted molt moderate

(Ufher,

Williams

,

Morton)

and many other Epifcopal Divines

with them,

had before this

in

a

Com-

mittee at

Wefiminfler,

agreed

on

certain Points

of Reformation

,

which

I

will give

you afterward,

though out

of

the proper place,

when we

come to

our

Propofals

at

the King's

Return

x66o. But

when the

fame

Men

faw

that

greater Things,

were aimedat, and Epifcopacy

it

felt in danger, or their Grandeur and Riches

at

theleak, rook of

them turned

againk the

Parliament, and

were almoft

as

much

dif

leafed as

others.

142.

3.

And

the great

difhuft which the Parliament had

of

the King,

was

ano-

ther thing which

haftened the

War

:

For they were

confident

that

he was

un-

moveable

as

to his

Judgment

and Affedtions, and

that

whatever he granted

them,

was but

in

defign

to

get

his

advantage

utterly todeftroy them

;

and that he did

but

watch

for filch

an

Opportunity

:

They

fuppofed

that

he

utterly abhorred

the

Parliament,

and

their

Adtions againR hisShip-money, hisJudges, Bifhops, 8-v.

and

therefore whatever he promifed

them,

they believed him

not, nor durit

take

his

word

;

which they

were hardened

in

by thofe former Adtions

of

his,

which they

called,

The Breach

of

bee

former

Promifis.

§

43.

And

the Things on the other

fide,

which occafioned theirDiffidence,

and

caufed

the War, were

thefe

following efpecially above all the

reit

: x.

The

Ar-

mies

of

the

Scots

and

Englifh

did long continue in the

North

undisbanded, in

their

Quarters,

till the Parliament

should

provide

their

Pay.

Some fay

other

Bufinefs

cooled

the

delay, and force

fay

that the Parliament

was

not

willing

that

they fhould

be fo

loondisbanded

;

but

the Army

of

the

Englifh

wanting pay,

was

eafily

dilcon-

tented: And the Parliament

fay

that the Courtdrew them into

a

Plot

againft

the

Houfe, to

march

fudelenly

up towards

London,

and

to Maker

the Parliament

:

Di-

vers

of the Chief

Officers were

Examined,

(Sir

Jacob

AJEIey,

O

Neale,

Sir Falk

Hunch,

(my Mother

-in -Law's Brother) and many others

;

and they

almoft all

con

-

felfed force fuch

thing, that

force near the

King (but not hehimfelf) had treated

with them

about

bringing up the Army, but none

of

them talkt

of

deftroying

or

E

s

forcing