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28

The

LIFE

of

the

L

Is.

I,

forcing the Parliament.

Thefe

Examinations and Depofitions were publilhed by

the

Parliament, which did very much to perfwade abundance of People that the

King did but watch white he quieted them with Promifes,to Matter them

by

Force,

and

ufe them

at

his

Pleafure.

And

this

A&ion

was one

of the

greatelt

Caufes

of

the

dangerous

diffidence

of

the King.

444

z.

Another

was this

:

When the Parliament

had

fit

a

Guard upon their

own

Houfe,

(which

they took to be their

Priviledge) the

King difcharged them,

and

fee

another Guard upon them

of

his

choofing

:

which made them

feem

as

much

afraid,

as

if

he had made

them Prifoners,

and would at fome time or

other

com-

mand that Guard to Execute

his

Wrath upon

them;

whereupon they

difmiffed

them,

and called for a

Guard

of

the City Regiments. This

alfo

did increafe

the

Diffidence.

445.33 Another

great Caufe

of

the

Diffidence and

War

was this

:

The

King

was advifèd

no longer to hand

by

,

and

fee

the Parliament affront hint

,

and do

what they lifted

;

but to take

a fuffrcient

Company with him, and to

go fhddenly.

in

Perfon

to the

Houfe, and

there to demand

fome

of

the Leading

Members

to

be

delivered

up to Juftice, and tried

as

Traitors:

Whereupon he goeth

to the

Houfe

of

Commons with

a

Company of

Cavaliers

with

Swords

and Pillola

,

to

have

charged

five

of the Members

of that

Houfe,

and one

of

the

Lords Houfe, with

High Treafon

; wiz.

Mr. Pim, Mr.

Hampden,

Mr.

Hollic,

Mr. Strowd, and Sir Ar-

thur

Hafelrigge

,

and the Lord

Kimbokvn

(after

Earl

of

Manchefter

and

Lord Cham-

berlain)

of

the

Lords

:

But

the King

was

not

fo

fecret or fpeedy in

this

Action,

but the Members

had

notice

of

it before

his

coming, and

abfented themfelves

(be-

ing

together at

an inner Houle in

Red

-Lyon Court

in

Warlingftreet

near

Bread/reef

in

London): And

fo

the King and

his

Company

laid

hands

on none, butwent their

ways.

Had the

five

Membersbeen

there, the

reh

fuppofed

they would

have

taken

them

away by violence.

When the King

was

gone, this Allarm did

call the Houle into fach Apprehen-

fiions,

as

if one

after

another,

their Liberties or

Lives

tnuft

be affaulted

by the

Sword

if

they

pleafed

not

the

Court

:

So

that they

prefently voted

it

a Breach

of

their

Priviledges, and

an

Effect

of the

King's

evil

Counfellors, and publitlted

their Votes

;

to awaken the People

to

refcue

them,

as

if

they werein apparent

Danger.

The

King

being difappointed, publilheth a Paper in which he chargeth the

Members with Treafon,

as

flirting up the

Apprenticesto tumultuous

Petitioning,

et7'e.

But confeffeth

his

Error in

violating

their

Priviledges.

4

46.

4.

And another thing which battened the War,

was,

that theLord

Dig

-

by

and fome other Cavaliers, attempted

at

Kingfton

upon

Thames,

to

have

fudden-

ly got together

a Body

of Horfe;

which the Parliament

took

as

the beginning

of

a War, or an Infurreetion and Rebellion

:

But

the Party

was

diflipatedbefore

they

could

grow

to

any great

Strength;

and

the Parliament

voted him

a

Delinquent,

and

fent to apprehend him and bring

him to

Juftice, with

his

Partakers:

But

he

fled

into

France; and when he wasthere,

the Parliament intercepted

force

of

his

Letters

to

the King, advifing him

to

get away from

London,

to

force place

of

Strength, where

his

Friends might come

to

him;

which they took

as

an

Advife

to him

tobegin

a

War.

Thus

one thing after another

blew

the

Coals.

S

47.

S.

But

of

all

the reE, there

was

nothing that with the People wrought

fo

much,

as

the

frith

Maffacree and Rebellion

:

The

frilly

Papills did

by

anunexpeQ_

ed Infurre&ion,

rife all

over

Ireland at

once, and

feized

upon almoh

all

the

Strengths

of

the

whole Land, and

Dublin

wonderfully efcaped (a Servant

of

Siryobn

Clotworrby's

difcovering

the Plot)

which

was

to

have been furprifed

with

the

reft,

Otlob. 23.

1641.

Two

hundred

thoufand Perlons they murdered, (asyou

may feein

the Earl

of

awry's Anfwer to

a

Petition,

and

in Dr.

Jones's

Narrative

of

the Examinations, and

Sir

Jobn

Temple's

Hiftory, who

was

one

of

the

refident

Juhices :) Men, Women and Children were molt

cruelly ufed; the

Women

rips

up, and filthily ufed when they killed

them, and the Infants

ufèd like

Toads

or

Vermin

:

Thoufands

of

thole that efcaped,

came

hript

and almoft famifhed

to

Dublin,

and afterwards

into

England

to beg their

Bread: Multitudes

of

them

were

driven together into Rivers, and

cah

over

Bridges and

drowned

:

Many Witnef-

fes

twore before the Lords

Juffices,

that

at

Portdown.bridge

a Vifion

every Day ap-

peared to the Paffengers

of

naked Perlons Banding

up

to the middle in

the River,

and

crying out,

Revenge, Revenge!

In

a

word, fcarceany Hiftory

mentioned' the

like barbarous Cruelty

as

this was

:

The

French

Maffacree murdered

but

Thirty,

or

Forty Thoufand;

but

Two Hundred Thoufand

was a

Number which ahonilhed thofe

that heard

it.

This