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P

A

Et

T

I:

ReverèndMr.

Richard

Baxter.

This

filled all

England

with

a

Fear

both

of

theIrifh, and

of the Papiffs at home

;

for

they

fuppofed

that the

Prieffs

and the Intereft

of

their Religionwere the Caufe:

In

fo

much,

that

when the

Rumour

of

a

Plot

was occafioned

at

London,

the poor

People,

all

the Countries over, were ready either to run

to

Arms,

or

hide

them

-

felves,

thinking that the

Papiffs were ready

to

rife

and cut their

i

And

when they taw

the

Englifb

Papifts

join with the King againft the Parliament,

it

was

the

greateft

thing

that

ever

alienated them from the King.

Hereupon

,

the Parliament

was

folicitous

to

fend help

to

Dublin, left

that

alfa

flaccid be loft.

The

King

was fo

forward to that

Service,

that

he preft

the Parlia-

ment that he might

go over

himfelf

:

The

Parliament liked

that

word}

of

all,

as

if

they had been confident

that

ill

Counfellors

advifed

him

to

it,

that

he might

get at

the Head

of

two Armies, and unite them both againft

the

Parliament, and

by his

Abfence make

a

Breach, and hinder

the Proceedings

of

the

Houfès.

Thofe

that

came out

of

Ireland

reprefent the

woful

Cafe

of

it, and the direfd

Ufage

of

the Protellants,

fo

as

provoked the People to think

that it

was impolfcble

that

any

Danger to them could

be

greater than

their

Participation

of

the

like.

Thd

few

that

were

left

at

Dublin

got

into

Armes, but complained

of

their

NecefTties,

and

the multitude

of

their

Enemies!

So

that an Hundred

were

ufed

to

fight

againft

a Thoufand

:

And to increafe the Flame, fome

Irifh

Rebels told

them,

that they

had

the King's

Commifeon

for

what they

did ;

which though the

foberer

part

could

not

believe,

yet the

credulous timerous vulgar were many

of

them ready to

believe

it:

And the

Englifh

Souldiers

(

under

Sir

Charles Coster,

the Lord

Incbeguin,

&c.

)

fend over word

that

it

was

the

common Fealt

of

the

Irifh,

that whenthey

haddone

with

the handful

that

was left in

Ireland,

they would come over into

England,

and

deal with the

Parliament and Proteltants here. Thefe Threatnings with the Name

of

Two

hundred thoufand murdered, and the Recital

of

their monftrous Cruel-

ties, made

many

thoufands

in

England

think

that nothing

could

be

more neceffary

than

for

the Parliament to put the

Countrey into an armed Pofture

for

their own

Defence. And

that

fide

which the Papilla

of

England

took, they could hardly

think would

be

their

Security.

4

48.

Things being thus ripened

fora

War

in England,

the King

forfaketh

Lon-

don,

and goeth

into the North, in

Torkfhire

he calleth the Militia

ofthe

Country

which

would

join

with him,

andgoeth to

Hid,

and demandeth

entrance

; Sir

Jahn

Hotbam

is

put in troll with it

by

the Parliament, and denieth him entrance with

his

Forces.

The

Parliament nameth Lord Lieutenants

for

the Militia

of

the

feveral

Counties,

and the King nameth other Lord Lieutenants by

a

Commifiìon

of

Aray, and

each

of

them command the

faid

Lord Lieutenants

to

fettle

the

Militia.

The Parliament publifheth their Votes

to the

People,

That the

King,

milled by

An.16¢t

evil

Counfel, was raifing

a

War

againft

his

Parliament

:

The

Lord

Willoubby

of

Parham in

Lincolnf sire,

the Lord

Brook

in

Warwiekfhire,

and

others

in other Coun-

ties, call

in the

Country

to

appear

in

Arms for

the Parliament

:

The

King's Lords

call them

in

to appear for

the

King

:

both King and Parliament

publifhed

their De-

clarations ¡unifyingtheir

Caufe.

The

Parliament choofeth

theEarl of

Effex

for their General,

and

refolveth

the

rafting

of

an Army,

as

[For

the Defence

of

the King and Parliament, and the Li-

berties

of

the

Suble&s,

againft evil Counfellors

and Delinquents

]

:

They

pubiifh

a Remonftrance

of

the

State

of

the Kingdom

firE,

and

a

Declaration

of

the Cau-

fes

of

their taking up Arms

afterward:

which two contain

moE

of

the

Reafons

of

their

Caufe.

The

King anfwereth them, and goeth to

Nottingham,

and there fetteth up

his

Standard

to

Summon

his Subje

&s

to

his

Aid.

The

Lord

Brook

and the

Earl

of

Northampton

had fume skuffling

in

Warwickfhire

f

The

Earl

of

N.

with

fome Forces affaulted Warwick

Cattle,

kept

by

Major John

Bridge,,

and

Coventry

City,

kept

by Col.

John

Barker,

and was repulft from both.

A

Party

affaulted

Mr.

Yurefoyer

Houfe, and burnt

the

Barns, where

Mr.

George

Ab-

bot,

with

a few

of

his Servants,

repulft

them.

At

Nottingham

there were butabout

Two

thoufand came in to the King's Stan-

dard, whereas the

Londoners

quickly

fill'd

up a

gallant Army for the Earl

of

Efx;

and the

Citizens abundantly brought in

their

Money and

Plate

(

yea, the

Women

their Rings)

to

Guildhall

to pay

the Army.

Hereupon the King

fens

to

the Parliament from

Nottingham

the Offer

of

a

Trea-

ty,

with force General Propofals, which in my

Opinion

was

the

likelieft

Oppor,

tunity that

ever

the Parliament had for

a

full

and

fàfe

Agreement;

and

the King

tidied