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Igo

The

.

L

IF

E

of

the

Part III.

ftri

&nefs

of

Univerfal

obedience, and

for

Thirty

years longing

to

be with

Christ;

In conftant daily

acquired infirmity

of

body

(

got

by avoiding all

Exercife,'

and long fecret prayer in

the

coldest Seafons, and fuch like

)

but of

a con

-

ititution

naturally

ftrong

:

afraid

of

recovering when ever

the was

ill

:

For

force days

before her death

the was fo

taken

with the Ninty

firft

Pfalm

that

i

the

would

get

thofe

that

came

near her

to

read

it

to her

over

aid

over

which

Pfalm

alfo was

a

great

means

of

Comfort

to

Old

Beza, even againft

his

Death.

§. 68. Soon

after

dyed

bane Matthews aged Seventy fix,

My

Haufe-keeper

fourteen

years

:

though

mean

of

quality, very eminent in

KiderminJler, and

the parts

about for

Wifdom, Piety,

and

a

holy,

Sober, Righteous, Exemplary

Life.

And

many

of

my

Old Hearers

and Flock

at

Kiderminfler

dyed

not

long efore.

Among

whom a mean

Freeholder

dames

Butcher

of

Wannerton,

hath:left

few equal

to

him

for

all

that

feemeth

to

approach

perfeftioa in

a

plain Man: O how many

holy

Souls

are

gone

to

Christ out

of that

one

Parini

of

kiderminjier

in

a

few years,

and

yet the

Number feemeth

to

increafe.

§. 69.

The

Book which

I

publilhed called

The

Poor

Man's Family

Book,

was

fo

well accepted,

that

I

found

it

,a

ufeful

work

of

Charity

to

give many

of

them

(

with

the

Call

to

the

Vnconverted) abroad

in

many

Countries, where

neither,

I,

nor

fuch

others

had leave

to

Preach

(

and many Hundreds

fine,

with

good

fuceefs.

)

§. 70.

The

thaws

were

fo

bad

for

felling Books,

that

I

was fain

to

be my

felf

at

the

charge

of Printing

my

Methodus Theologie,

fame

friends contributed about

Eighty

pounds,' towards it

;

It

cost me one way

or other about

Five

hundred

pounds: About

Two

hundred and

fifty

pounds

I

received from thofe

Noncon-

formists

that

bought them.

The

Contrary party fet

themfelves

to

hinder

the

.fate

of

it,

becaufe

it

was

mine,

tho'

elfe

the

Marine

of

it,

being

half

Philofo-

phical.,

and

halfConciliatory would

have pleafed

the

Learned

part of

them. But

-fnofi lay

it

by as

too hard for

them,

as

over

Scholaftical

and

exaa.

I

wrote

it

:and

my

Engle

Chriftian Direllory

to

make

up one Compleat Body

of

Theology,

The

Latin one

the Theory,

and

the

Englifh

one

the

Prafical part.

And

the

'Iatteris

commonly accepted becaufe

lefs difficult.

§.

71.

My

short

piece

againft

Popery

called The Certainty

of

Chtiflianity

without

Popery,

provedof

ufe

againft

Infidels

as well

as

PapiJEs

But

molt deceivedmen

will

not

be

at

the

labour

to

study any

thing

that

is

diftin& and

exaa,

but take up

with

the fish

appearances

of

things.

§,'

72.

The

Miferahle State

of

Youngmen

in

London,

was a

great trouble

to

my

mind;

Efpecially Rich men's Sons and Servants, Merchant;: and Lawyers

Appren-

tices and Clarks,

carried

away by

the

flelh,

to

drinking,

Gluttony,

Plays, Gaming,

Whoring,

Robbing their Matters/2'c.

I

wrote, therefore

a

fmalTraEate for

fuch,

called

Comp.ujfionate Counfel to Toung

men

e

Sir

Robert

Atkins

contributed towards

the

charge

of

Printing

it,

and I gave

of

them in City and Country

One thoufand

five

hundred,

betides

what

the

Bookfeller fold

:

But few will read

it that

moll

need.

§. 73. About

this time

dyed my

dear friend Mr.

Thomas

Gouge,

of

whore Life

you may

fee a

little

in

-Mr.

Clark's

left book

of,

Lives

:

A wonder

of

fincere

iú-

duftrie

in

works of Charity

; It

would

make a Volume

to

recite at large,theChari-

ty

he ufed

to

his

poor Parithioners

at

Sepulchres

(before

he was Ejefìed and Silen-

ced

for

Non-

conformity

; His

Conjunfiion with Alderman

AJhurjl and fome fuch

others, in

a weekly

Meeting, to

take account

of the

honeft poor

families

in

the

City that

were in

great want,

he being

the Treafurer

and

Vifiter;

his

voluntary

Catechizing

the Chritt's

Church boyes when he might

not

preach:

The

many

thouCand Bibles

Printed

in

Weill

that

he

difperfed in

Wales

; The

Prallice

of

Piety,

The Whale

Duty

of

Man,

My

Call,

and

many thoufands

of

his own

Wri-

ting,

given freely

all

over

Wales

; his Petting up

about

Three hundred or

Four hun-

dred

Schools

in

1-Vales

to

teach

Children

only

to

read,

arid

the

Catechife, his

in-

.

dultry

to

beg money

for

all

this,

betides

molt

of

his

own Estate laid

out on

it;

His

Travels over

Wales

once

or

twice

a

year

to

vifite his

Schools

and

fee

to

the

Execution

:

This

was

true

Epifcopacy

of

a

filenced

Miniher

(

whoyet went

con

-

Rantly

to the

Parish

Churches, and

was

authorized by an old Univerfitp

Licenfe

to