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x

4

Elifha's

C

R

Y

aauated

by

the

fame

hope of

the

fame bleffed State above,

as

our

Encouragement

to

perfift in

what

we

undertake and

all

this

by

the

Ç

a

e

Redeemer.

Chrilt yet

abides

the

fame, and will

take Care,

that

all his Faithful Minifters want not

that

Unaion,

nor that meafureof

it,

which

their

important

FaaEcion calls

for.

O Let

this therefore

fhame

and

Check

our immoderate Refentments of the

recefs

of

filch

as

this

Elijah

was, though Excellent and

ufeful

Prophets.

And

(rather than pour

out

our

Tears

abundantly upon

the

Hearfe, and Memory of

retired Prophets to

their Eternal home)

let as rejoyce

that

Chrilt

is

gone

to

Heaven

;

that our

remo

-'

ved Prophets are

now

with

him and

that

Chrift

himfeif

e're

longwill bring and

keep

us

altogether with hhnfeif,

o Cor.

iv. s4,

s .

i

`IhrJ:'iv.

siv,

t

---

3.

and,

Ver.28.

Wherein

we find

Chrift pleading

clofely, and

reproving

their

immoderate Griefs for his Departure, in thefe

words,

Ye

have beard

how

I

faid

toyou.,

I

go away

and

come

again

to

you.

Ifyc

loved me, ye

would

rejoyce becaufe

I

faid,

I

go

to

the

Father,

for

my Father

is

greater

than

I. Chrift

hereby

tries

the tem-

per of their

Love, and

minds them

of the regular

management

of

that

Central

Grace,

and tacitly upbraids

them with the

undifcerned coarfnefs

of their

love

to

him. They were

to

walk by

Faith;

and to

he

more folicitous about the future

than the prefent Este of things

; and about

their

accommodations

for their ap-

proaching

Work,

and

Tryals,

than for the

plcafures

that

refulted from

a

prefent

friend

on

Earth,

though

it

were

Chrilt

himfeif in flefh. And one would

think,

the

Apoftle

Paul

himfeif

was

more than toucht

with the

fenfe

and favour

of

this

pnllhge,

by

what

he

has

left

upon Record in ii

Cor.

v. 16.

Where

he

thus

Vents

himfeif;

Wherefore

(faith he)

henceforth

know we no

man after

the

Fl

fh

-

yea

though

we

have

known

Chrifl

after

the

Flefh,

yet

now

henceforth

know we

him

no

mare:

Th

n-

forcements

of

which Charge and Connfel you have

in

Per,

t

7

-

-

-t

y.

3.

As this

is

a Providential

Day

fpr

Funeral

Thoughts

and Sorroìvs,becaafe

of

God's

heavy hand upon

the

World

and

Church, my

Selfand

You,

by

the

Removal

of

Elijah's

lively Image,

The

Reverend and Excellent Mr.

Richard

Baxter

:

So

we

have

to

evescire

our prefent thoughts,

(1.

)

The

Prophet's Charaller and Exit.

(

a.)

God's

Voice

to

us

thereby.

( 3.)

Our

Great

Concern

to

have

God's

pre

-

fence

with you, and

the Prophet's Mantle with

me

(if

fuck

a

thing

can

be ExpeB-

ed by

me)

to

our belt benefit and advantage.

(i.

) As to the

Cbaral1er

of

that

Proph

et,

whole

Soul is gone

from

us

to

Heaven

:

Mr. Richard Baxter was

a

perfon defervedly

of great

Fame

and Cha-

rafter

in his Day.

He feem'd

to

be a

Tranfcript of

what

is

left

upon Record con-

cerning

St.

Pant,

Sylvanas

and

Timothy

in i

7

he]r.

ii.

t.

-

-

-s a.

'Tis

evident

he

was a

Man

of

God,

a

Gafpel-Prophet.

He

was

furaifhed for fervent

in,

painful about,

and faithful

to

his Minifterial

Trutt

and

Work

:

And extraordi-

nary in the evident

acceptance and

fuccelfes

of

his Minifterial

Labours.

A

Man

of

clear, deep, fixed thoughts ;

a

Man

of

copious and well-digefted Reading

;

a Man

of

ready, free, and very

proper Elocution;

and

aptly expref

,,ve

of

his own thoughts

and

fentiments. He

was

molt

intent

upon

the

weightieft and

miff

ufeful

parts of

Learning

;

yet

a

great

lover

of

all

kinds and degrees thereof. He

could, in

Preaching,

Writing,

Conference, accommodate himfeif

to

all

Capacities ; and

an-

fwer

his

Obligations

to

the Wife

and

Unwife: He

had a moving

waits

,

and

ufeful Acrimony in his

words.; neither did

his Exprefliions

want their

Emphatical

Accent,

as

the

Matter did require. And

when

he fpake

of

weighty

Soul-

Concerns,

you

might

find his

very Spirit Drench'd

therein,

He

was

pleafingly

converfible,

fave in

his

Studying

-

hours, wherein

he could

not

hear with

trivial

difturbances.

He was

fparingly

facetious

;

but never light or frothy.

His

heart

was

warm,

plain fixed ;

his

Life

was Blamelefs,

Exemplary,Uniform. He

was

immoveable,

where apprehenfive

of

his

Duty

;

yet

Affable and Condefcending where

likelihood

of

doing

good was in his propee&. His Perfonal Abítinence, Severities and La-

boars, were

exceeding

great:.

He kept his Body

at

an Ender

;

and always fear'd

pampering

his

fleih too

much

.

He

diligently, and with

great pleafure minded

his

Matter's

Work

within doors

and

without,

whilft

he was able.

His Charity

was

very great ;

greatly proportionable

to

his

Abilities:

hisPurfe

was

ever open

to

the Poor

;

and, where

the

Cafe

requir'd

it,

he

never thought great

Sums

too

much

:

he

rather

gave Cumulatim

than

Denariatim ; and

fated

what

he gave

to

the

Neceffities and

Characters

of thofe

he gave

to

:

Nor

was his

Charity

cort-

fin'd