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PREFACE.

v ii

•* everlasting fire of hell so visible, and represents the

tormenting passions of the damned in those dreadful

“ colours, that, if duly considered, would check and

“ controul the unbridled licentious appetites of the

“ most sensual wretches.”

Heavenly rest is a subject, in its own nature so universally important and interesting, and at the same

time so truly engaging and delightful, as sufficiently

accounts for the great acceptance which this book has

met with ; and partly also for the uncommon blessing

which has attended Mr. Baxter’s manner of treating the subject, both from the pulpit and the press.—

Por where are the operations -of divine grace more

reasonably to be expected, or where have they in fact

been more frequently discerned, than in concurrence

with the best adapted means ? ' And should it appear,

that persons of distinguishing judgment and piety;

have expressly ascribed their first religious impressions to the hearing or reading the important sentiments contained in this book; or, after a long series

of years, have found it both the counterpart and the

improvement of their own divine life, will not this be

thought a considerable recommendation of the book

itself?

Among the instances of persons that dated their

true conversion from hearing the sermons on the

Saint’s Rest, when Mr. Baxter first preached them,

was the Rev. Tho. Doolittle, M. A. who was a native

of Kidderminster, and at that time a scholar, about

seventeen years old; whom Mr. Baxter himself afterwards sent to Pembroke hall, in Cambridge, where

he took his degree. Before his going to the university, he was upon trial as an attorney’s clerk, and

under that character being ordered by his master to

write something on the Lord’s day, he obeyed with

great reluctance, and the next day returned home,

with an earnest desire that he might not apply himself to any thing as the employment of life, but serving Christ in the ministry of the gospel. His praise

is yet in the churches, for his pious and useful labours,

as a minister, a tutor, and a writer.